Archive for March, 2017

Fun Wallpaper Pattern for a Not-Too-Serious Master Bath

March 17, 2017

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This fun and somewhat ethnic looking wallpaper pattern went into the master bathroom of a newly remodeled 1939 brick bungalow in Montrose (Houston).

The homeowner kept saying, “It changes it SO MUCH! Before, it was just all white. Boring white. This has personality, and the room feels larger, too.”

The wallpaper is by Hygge & West, an on-line company, and is called “Diamante.” ¬†Unlike most of their papers, which waffle, and curl at the seams (see yesterday’s post), this one was a positive delight to work with. I am guessing that that’s because there is not as much ink on this pattern.

“Otomi” Forest Frollic Wallpaper Pattern by Hygge & West

March 16, 2017

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Like animals? Like the forest? Like a little whimsy? Then this wallpaper pattern is for you!

I hung this in a children’s bathroom in a very nicely remodeled 1939 brick cottage in Montrose (inner Houston). The bottom 1/3 of the walls was shiny white subway tile, and the straight-lined vanity cabinets below were painted a strong, glossy yellow. The navy blue wallpaper pattern looked smart against the white tile, and the color perfectly complimented the yellow cabinetry.

This wallpaper pattern is called “Otomi,” and is in the Emily Isabella line by Hygge & West. This wallpaper can be bought on-line.

Wallpaper on the Azalea Trail Home Tour, 2017, pt II

March 15, 2017

I attended the Azalea Trail Home Tour yesterday, which took me to four homes in the rather exclusive neighborhood of River Oaks (Houston). As always, I was scrutinizing the wallpaper.

One traditional style home had a very classic design of wallpaper (sort of a damask) in the dining room. Ever since I attended a Wallcovering Installers Association convention seminar years ago on “balancing” wallpaper patterns, I have been obsessed with the concept. This means that you position a dominant feature of the pattern so that it is centered on the wall. (Do a Search here to see some of my previous posts.) Normally, you can do this once in a room. Thereafter, the pattern has to fall on subsequent walls as it comes off the roll.

But in this dining room, there were about three walls that had the pattern centered. It looked wonderful, because the design was centered on a main focal wall between two windows, and again on an adjacent wall behind the buffet, an then on another wall that was highly visible.

Now, how can this happen?

I really studied the room. And I realized that all the draperies in the room reached way above the windows to the ceiling. And the drapery fabric and hardware pretty much filled up the entire space over the windows. Meaning that, the drapes would hide anything that was above the windows.

Meaning that, if the paperhanger chose, he could place the pattern as he wanted on the walls, and then mis-match the wallpaper pattern over the windows, knowing that it would be hidden from view. Then he could move on to the next section of wall and place the pattern as he wanted.

This trick worked nicely in this room, because the wallpaper design and color, as well as the draperies and hardware were all amenable.

It also took collaboration from the very planning stages, between the interior designer and the wallpaper installer, and also including input from the drapery lady and the hardware installer.

Wallpaper on the Azalea Trail Home Tour, 2017, pt I

March 14, 2017

Yesterday, I went on the Azalea Trail Home Tour, which is in the “toney” River Oaks neighborhood of Houston. Not many of the homes had wallpaper, but I was intrigued by those that did.

One home had paper in its powder room. It was a tone-on-tone neutral colored floral in a vertical pattern and a not-too-serious feel. What’s cool is that the pattern continued up and onto the ceiling. But the ceiling was curved, which is not conducive to wallpaper. And furthermore, the floral pattern went up onto the ceiling, but it faded out as it crept up higher onto the surface.

I looked and looked and studied that room for a long time – and finally realized that the wallpaper stopped at the ceiling line. The floral pattern that continued up and onto the ceiling was not wallpaper, but very skillfully painted motifs.

The colors of both the background and the flowers were spot-on, the artist had shaped the petals and stems almost perfectly, and had even recreated the thickness of the paint and the brush strokes used to make the petals.

It was an immensely skillful and artistic job, and was a real pleasure to see.

Wallpaper, Vanity, Counter Top – All Beautifully Coordinated

March 12, 2017


“Softly homogeneous” is a perfect description.

This is in a powder room in a new home in Bellaire (Houston).

Wallpaper on Bookshelves Brightens a Dark Room

March 11, 2017

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This living room in a home in the Bunker Hill Village area has lots of windows, yet gets little natural light, and has skimpy interior lighting. In addition, the dark wood of the built-in bookcases seems to suck up what little light there is.

Interior designer Layne Ogden used this light tan faux grasscloth to both add textural interest to the back of the bookshelves, as well as lighten them up. Just this little touch brings a lot of lightness into the room.

The wallpaper is a vinyl product by Thibaut, with a textured surface that look like real woven grasscloth. Because it’s man-made, there is none of the visible seams or color variations between strips, nor the staining problems that are inherent to real grasscloth, plus it’s washable. It’s a little thick and tricky to trim or turn corners, but I like this product a whole lot and try to steer people toward it when they are considering grasscloth. It is called Bankun Raffia.

Flaw of the Day

March 10, 2017

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It’s been a while since I ranted about defects or damage to wallpaper. Well, today it reared its head again.

Here is a small dot of the wrong color on this wallpaper. Seems insignificant, but, really, it mars the look of what these homeowners have spent so much money on. I think they deserve better.

So (after carefully measuring to be sure we had enough paper), I ripped the offending strip off the wall, and replaced it with a new one. All is good.

Getting Very Femininidity In Here

March 9, 2017

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The homeowner calls this her “Lady’s Library.” It’s easy to see why – the room about the most frilly and feminine that I’ve ever done!

The bookshelves are backed with a light colored, finely-textured grasscloth in a lovely lavender shade. The walls are covered in a “swoopy” pattern, also in lavender, reminiscent of velvet curtains in theaters during the Victorian era.

The grasscloth is by Schumacher (#5004724), and the wallpaper is in the Ronald Redding line by Wallquest (#CB1209). The interior designer is Pamela O’Brien of Pamela Hope Designs, based right here in Houston.

Lavender Grasscloth Wallpaper on Bookshelves

March 8, 2017

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A simple but dramatic change … This softly-colored grasscloth has a fine texture, but it’s just enough to set off the books and decorative items that will be displayed on the bookshelves.

The shelves could not be removed, so I had to work in tight spaces, with each strip being less than 12″ high. The bottom shelf was at floor level!

In order to eliminate a visible seam down the center, I “railroaded” the grasscloth – ran it horizontally. I used a sewing / crafting self-healing cutting mat to pre-trim the right side of each strip, making sure it was perpendicular to the edge that would be the top of the strip.

This made for less trimming at the wall, less paste smeared on the woodwork, and reduced the chance of paste getting on the surface of the paper, which could stain it.

The manufacturer of the grasscloth is Schumacher, and the pattern number is #5004724.

The interior designer for this job is Pamela O’Brien of Pamela Hope Designs in Houston.

Run Away From Two Different Runs

March 7, 2017
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Look at the number right next to my pencil, and then look at the corresponding number below it. These two bolts of wallpaper have two different run / batch / dye lot numbers, meaning, they were printed at two different times, from two different batches of ink.

This means that they can be slightly, or even VERY slightly different in color. But even a slight difference in color can be eye-jarring on the wall, when you have two 9′ strips of wallpaper next to one another.