Posts Tagged ‘banged edges’

Nicely Packaged Wallpaper

April 3, 2017

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One of my big complaints about wallpaper is when it arrives with banged up edges – damage caused by poor packaging and mishandling during shipping. Depending on the extent of the damage and the type of paper, these banged edges can render wallpaper unusable.

This manufacturer (Graham & Brown) has got it figured out – the paper was nicely wrapped in plastic and came in a good enough cardboard shipping box. But the extra step was these cardboard end-caps that completely protect the edges of the rolls of wallpaper, and protect them from dings and wrinkles.

Beautifully Packaged Wallpaper

November 1, 2016

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One of my big rants is about wallpaper that has banged up edges, due to being bashed about during shipping. “All the manufacturer has to do is add a little bubble wrap,” I say. Some companies use thin cardboard “collars” around the ends of the bolts – but these end up being too tight and crimping the wallpaper, which creates dents and scars.

Well, this manufacturer went a mile beyond, and came up with a way to keep the bolts of paper free from any shipping damage.

Each roll of wallpaper is encased in a plastic sleeve. At either end of each roll is a “puck” made of corrugated cardboard (not visible in the photo), custom-cut to fit the diameter of the bolt, and with a tab in the center that pokes into the center of the bolt of rolled up wallpaper, ensuring that it stays in place. All inside that plastic sleeve.

Then each of those bundles is placed inside a custom-tailored-to-fit box made of cushioned corrugated cardboard; one double roll of wallpaper to a box.

Then all of those boxes were placed inside a large shipping box, also made of cushy corrugated cardboard.

This is by far the best thought-out and most-effective protective wrapping I have ever seen. Every single bolt of wallpaper arrived in perfect condition.

The product line is A-Street Prints, and the manufacturer is Brewster.

Reasons To Discard Paper / Reasons To Buy Extra

August 1, 2016
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In the top picture, you see a mark on the wallpaper, which is common with the first foot or so of paper as it comes off a new bolt. The second photo shows edges that got banged up during shipping. Sometimes these will flatten out as the paper dries, but other times I try to avoid using them.

The third picture shows a speck of black ink on the back of the wallpaper. I discarded this piece, because I feared the speck would show through the front side, especially once the paper was wet with paste. In the last photo, I am holding the paper up to the window, and you can definitely see the dot from the front side. Better to not risk using it.

These all reasons to purchase a little extra paper, so you can reject defective pieces, and still have enough to paper your room.

Edges Banged Up in Shipping

June 4, 2016
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I haven’t had this complaint in a while, but here you are – edges of wallpaper rolls that got banged up during shipping. Sometimes these bashed edges flatten out once the paste dries, but sometimes they still show.

This was packaged in a cardboard box. But – com’on, Thibaut – all it takes is a little bubble wrap in the bottom!

Nicely Packaged Wallpaper – For a Change

January 2, 2016

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There can be all kinds of flaws and defects with wallpaper, but mostly I complain about banged up edges, which happen during shipping. Most manufacturers put ship their merchandise in cardboard boxes with no padding. Some even send it in paper envelopes, with no cushioning whatsoever.

Today, I arrived at the job site and saw this. Wow!

Maybe someone in the Powers That Be got the message ? … These four double roll bolts came packaged in a custom-sized box, with just enough room for bubble wrap on top, on bottom, and on either end. That bubble wrap effectively did the job to cushion the ends of the wallpaper from dings during shipping.

Way to go, Schumacher! 🙂

Wallpaper That Looks Like Slabs of Agate Stone – Candice Olson

August 14, 2015
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Here’s a winning look, wallpaper that mimics the cut agate stone, complete with a pearly shimmer – so characteristic of designer Candice Olson!

I hung this in a powder room in a new “tall skinny house” in the Heights neighborhood of Houston. The home’s style has a Victorian feel, but the homeowner’s furnishings were what I would call “elegant contemporary.” This wallpaper pattern is a perfect blend of the two.

I did have a little trouble with banged edges, as you can see in the last photo. But I was able to work around the worst of them, and there was enough paper to finish the room.

The paper is by York, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Flaw of the Day – Embossed Ridge, Wrinkles, and Banged Edges

December 31, 2014

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Unrolling this wallpaper revealed some disappointments – In the first photo, you see a ridge that has been pressed into the paper. Also in that shot you can see the bane of my existence, the all-too-common-but-so-easy-to-prevent-if-they-would-just-use-a-little-bubble-wrap-before-shipping banged edges. In the second photo, most of this roll got caught somehow in the printing press, and got wrinkled.

Sometimes banged edges will flatten out when the wallpaper is dry (These are too noticeable and so the roll is unuseable), or sometimes you can plot so that that edge of the paper will be cut off, for instance, when you come to a door. But the wrinkles are inescapable, and caused an entire 9-yard bolt to be unusable.

The paper is by Thibaut Designs, usually one of my favorite brands for both pattern and workability. Luckily, I had the client order enough paper so we can still get the room finished, without having to use any of this defective stuff.

Nice Packing Job, for a Change!

December 16, 2014

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This wallpaper was made in England, and – wow! – look at how carefully it was packaged. A double-thick cardboard box, cushioned with bubble wrap AND foam inserts at the ends of the box, to protect the edges of the wallpaper. All this did a good job, too… No banged edges! 🙂

Funnily enough, though, the paper itself had some manufacturing faux-pas, with little ruffly areas along the left edge, for about 1/3 of each roll. I was able to cut around most of this (Note: Always buy extra paper, just in case!), and what did end up on the wall was not very noticeable.

This wallpaper is made by Bespoke, a British company.

Protecting the Ends of Wallpaper – With Another Brand Name

August 2, 2013

Digital ImageI frequently complain about edges of wallpaper that get banged up during shipping, and can look bad on the wall. On May 12, 2013, I blogged about how one company took measures to prevent this. https://wallpaperlady.wordpress.com/2013/05/12/finally-someone-did-something-to-prevent-banged-edges/

What’s odd is, these are exactly the same papers (slight color difference), and exactly the same cardboard end-protectors… but the brand names are completely different.

So here’s your proof that the “manufacturer” is getting his product from the same place as other manufacturers, and simply puts his own brand label on the material.

Flaw of the Day – Banged Edges, Dirty Edges, Spot, Blob

October 13, 2012

I hung this same paper a few weeks ago, and blogged about it. The first shipment of that order, the patern match was off, so we had to send the paper back and get a new run.

Today, this batch matches just fine. But there are a few issues … For starters, my never-ending rant about banged edges. This paper was shipped in a bag, not a box, and with no cushioning around the ends of the rolls. On a thinner paper, the banged edges usually pull flat to the wall and disappear, and with a busier pattern, they are not so noticeable

But with this very plain pattern, and the thick “non-woven” substrate, the banged edges are fairly visible. Still, these are relatively minor, and not noticeable when viewed from a distance – plus, the homeowner was very eager to finally get her bedroom finished and back together – so I went ahead and hung this paper.

The first pic shows not a banged edge, but a weird impression – probably done at the factory by something pressing into the material, or possibly during shipping. Whatever it was, the imprint is pretty visible, if you ask me. I was able to cut around a few of these imprints, but had to put a few on the wall, because there was precious little paper to play with.

In the second photo, there is a weird blob in the material. I think that something pressed against the paper during processing, and pooched that area out a little, as it seemed to have delaminated from the backing. It was farily low on the wall, and not real major, so I left this strip in place.

In the second photo, also, you can see that the seams on this thick, somewhat spongy non-woven paper are fairly visible, depending on the lighting. This was a little bothersome to the homeowner on my previous job.

A few weeks ago, I bid a job where the homeowner was looking at another thick, spongy, plain (no pattern) paper, and I told her that the seams would probably be equally visible. She listened, and decided against that sort of paper, looking instead for a thinner material printed on traditional substrate (as opposed to these new “green” non-woven materials).

People often remark that I’m too picky. But I DO see these things, even if the homeower does not. And I think that if you are spending a lot of money for the paper, and paying me good money to put it up, then you ought to get top-quality merchandise, not stained or bashed goods. Likewise, I have the responsibility to do my very best to be sure it’s put up properly and cleanly.

Moving on.

In the third photo, you see how even a small banged edge does show up when the strip is placed next to another on the wall. In addition, there is a teeny blue dot on strip on the left – lower right quadrant. This wasn’t too noticeable.

However, the first strip I put up had two brown smudges on the right edge, and they DID show up, when the next strip was placed next to it. I had to pull it down and replace it. We were very tight with paper on this job, but luckily there was enough to replace this one strip. And you can bet that I counted and measured and plotted, before going ahead and ripping that stained strip off!