Posts Tagged ‘bunker hill village’

Wallpaper on Bookshelves Brightens a Dark Room

March 11, 2017

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This living room in a home in the Bunker Hill Village area has lots of windows, yet gets little natural light, and has skimpy interior lighting. In addition, the dark wood of the built-in bookcases seems to suck up what little light there is.

Interior designer Layne Ogden used this light tan faux grasscloth to both add textural interest to the back of the bookshelves, as well as lighten them up. Just this little touch brings a lot of lightness into the room.

The wallpaper is a vinyl product by Thibaut, with a textured surface that look like real woven grasscloth. Because it’s man-made, there is none of the visible seams or color variations between strips, nor the staining problems that are inherent to real grasscloth, plus it’s washable. It’s a little thick and tricky to trim or turn corners, but I like this product a whole lot and try to steer people toward it when they are considering grasscloth. It is called Bankun Raffia.

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Ditzy Dots Do a Disappearing Act

November 28, 2015
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The new owners of this home in Bunker Hill Village (Houston) inherited this wallpaper in their home office. It’s what I call “ditzy repetitive,” and was popular in the ’90’s – although there are plenty of current wallpaper sample books displaying this type of pattern. I, myself, have never been a fan. Well, neither was the lady of the house.

In the attic, she found scraps of a grasscloth that had been used in an upstairs room. The soft green / grey / brown color and nubby texture coordinated perfectly with colors and themes in the first level of the home, and there was enough to paper the backs of the bookshelves in the home office.

First, I stripped off the patterned wallpaper (3rd photo). To do this, I wet the surface of the paper with a sponge, then used a putty knife and my hands to remove the top inked layer of wallpaper, then used the sponge again to wet the backing, which then came away from the wall easily (because the previous installer had used a primer, like you’re supposed to do). I used the sponge to remove paste residue, then hung the new grasscloth.

The grasscloth is a pleasing update in this home office, and also coordinates nicely with the colors used throughout the home. The last photo shows you the nubby texture and visible seams typical of grasscloth.

Corresponding String Cloth in Adjacent Room, on Bookshelves

March 19, 2015

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Wow, I have not hung string cloth in at least a decade! It is a paper-backed product with actual string fibers on the surface. That’s why there is a somewhat fuzzy aspect to the look.

Here you see the bookshelves primed and waiting for paper, and then the finished job. I took care to place the darkest stripe in the center.

There is an interesting story with this job, and a good lesson to me. I had just finished hanging the coordinating wallpaper in the adjoining exercise room. That paper was a paste-the-wall product on a non-woven backing. I started to work with the striped paper, and assumed it was the same material. I had the first bookshelf done, three strips, and noticed bubbles in the wallpaper and puckering at the seams. I could “chase” these out – but they kept coming back.

Puckering and bubbling are usually caused by the paper absorbing moisture from the paste, and does not happen with non-woven materials (not usually, anyway – I have had it happen). So I dug around and found the instructions. Turns out, this pattern, even though it was a companion to the one I had just finished hanging, and was the same color and printed on seemingly the same substrate, this one was specified to have the paper pasted (not paste the wall). And, they recommended a 10-minute booking (relaxing) time, to allow the paper to absorb the paste, expand, and relax.

Hmmm. Lesson to self: Even if you’ve hung 10,000 rolls of paper, including this same brand, ALWAYS read the instructions. 🙂

Because I had a good primer (Gardz) under the paper, I was able to pull off the strips without damage to the wall. And because it was printed on the non-woven substrate, and had not gotten completely dry, the paper came off in one piece, totally intact.

I didn’t have time to haul in and set up my table, so I laid down some drop clothes on the floor, spread the paper out on them, rolled on paste, booked, (no need for relaxing time, since the paper had already had time to absorb moisture and expand), and then hung the paper.

Whew! It as a bit of a mad dash, but it was the right answer. The newly pasted and hung strips went up perfectly, no bubbles, and the seams were nice and flat. The paper did stretch a little bit, though, horizontally, but not vertically, so I had to trim a little off one side, and it did throw off my placement of the center stripe in one of the bookcases, but, in the end, it looked great.

All this took a little time and more work, but I am glad that I noticed the bubbles and went through the steps to get rid of them. Sometimes, they disappear when the paper dries and shrinks. But you can’t plan on that. So I am glad I took the extra effort to make the job look perfect. The homeowners loved it. (They did not know any of the drama involved in getting a smooth, flat, bubble-free surface.)

This wallpaper design is by Carl Robinson, made by Wallquest which is made for Seabrook, and was hung in a family room in a house in Bunker Hill Village.

A Fancy-Dancy Exercise Room

March 18, 2015

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Isn’t this about the fanciest-schmanciest exercise room you’ve ever seen? What a delight to work out in this room! The wallpaper is a damask with a trellis/lattice pattern, by Carl Robinson, for Wallquest, for Seabrook, in blue and silver, with a little sparkle tossed in the mix. It is printed on a non-woven substrate, and was a paste-the-wall product (rather than paste the paper).

The first pic is after I smoothed the textured wall, and primed with a clear primer called Gardz. It’s not as pretty as when I use a white primer, but for floated walls, Gardz is the best primer. The original paper had a printing defect, so I could not hang it that same day, and they had to reorder a different run.

Two weeks later, the paper had arrived and I was able to finish the room. I plotted the layout so the “X” of the lattice design would line up with the center vertical mullion in the window.

The treadmill and the exercycle were heavy, too heavy to move, so it was a little tricky working around them. I could not get my ladder to straddle the treadmill, so had to dig a stool out of my van and set that on the treadmill, so I could reach the top of the wall.

This house is in Bunker Hill Village, and is home to an active family with teenage girls and a real, live cowboy husband!

Oh, and … the wife plans to yank all that exercise equipment out of the room and bring in a pretty desk, a crystal chandelier, and turn it into a nifty home office. Hubby doesn’t know that yet. Not many men read my wallpaper blog, so I’m sure the wife’s secret plot is safe. 🙂