Posts Tagged ‘ceiling’

Once Again, Wallpaper in Better Homes & Gardens Magazine

August 2, 2017

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Here are several rooms featuring wallpaper in the August 2017 issue of Better Homes & Gardens magazine. There are at least two other rooms with paper that I didn’t photograph, including a cool mural of some bright watercolory flowers clustered around the upper right corner and center top of the wall – a very effective look.

As usual, please forgive my crummy photos.

The navy blue sailing ships are by Walnut Wallpaper.

The second photo shows large stars on the ceiling of a baby’s nursery.

Photos 3 & 4 are actually fabric, but they look and function as backdrops like wallpaper.

Photos 5 & 6 are a classic and popular humming bird pattern by Cole & Son. I just hung this in the Houston Heights on April 9, 2017, and did it prior to that on March 24, 2016, among other times. You can look up my blog posts for those days. I have the same pattern and same color coming up in a bedroom in Riverside. Note the matching fabric on the chairs.

In the seventh photo the wallpaper is barely visible over the kitchen window.

Photo 8 is an overscaled dramatic white on black floral that is quite popular right now. I find it a little overwhelming on the ceiling, but if you want drama, that’s a good way to get it. And you’ll have good view of it while lying in bed.

Photos 9 & 10 are a fun and colorful pattern for a kids’ room.

The last photo is not wallpaper, but tile, but it still shows pattern on the wall, so I’m including it here to show how it enlivens the room. There is a hexagonal geometric pattern by Jonathan Adler that is quite similar, and very popular.

Wallpaper Chinoiserie in a Powder Room – China Seas

April 27, 2017

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The powder room in this 20-year old home in the Houston Heights was originally painted a deep avocado green. It was beautiful but claustrophobic, and the new homeowners wanted an updated change. This two-toned Chinoiserie in grey and white is lighter and brighter, has an uplifting feel, trends modern yet is timeless (Chinoiseries never go out of style), and visually expands the room.

This was a difficult room to wallpaper. Due to its location under the stairs, it has a sloping ceiling. There is a window smack in the middle of the focal wall, there was a wall-mounted mirror and a wall-mounted cabinet, there were four points of intricate molding to cut around, there were obtuse wall angles (more tricky than right angles), the width of the wallpaper strips didn’t correlate to the dimensions of the walls, door, or window, and there were numerous areas where the paper had to go from floor to ceiling, instead of the traditional ceiling to floor – all to name a few challenges in this room.

The wallpaper rolls had shards of shavings left on its edges, which I scrubbed off with a toothbrush, and then used a sanding block to really clean the edges of each strip. Still, there were rough edges so that not all the seams fit together quite as nicely as usual.

Instead of being set in the ceiling, the exhaust fan was set in the wall. This directed it straight outside which is nice, but it left the ugly vent cover smack in the middle of the wall. To disguise this, I covered the appliance with wallpaper. This took about an hour, and presented challenges in itself. See other post (do a Search) for more info.

This wallpaper pattern is called “China Seas,” by Thibaut Designs, and was bought at below retail price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. She is great at helping you find just the perfect paper! Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Geometric Wallpaper Patterns – Accommodating UnPlumb Walls and Windows, and UnLevel Ceilings and Floors

February 24, 2017
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When entering this 2-room bathroom suite, the first thing you see is the window on the far wall. Because the window is the focal point, I chose to center the wallpaper’s pattern on it. As you can see in the first two photos, the geometric pattern is perfectly balanced on either side of the window.

But since walls and windows and ceilings and floors and etc., are never perfectly plumb or level, you can plot the pattern to be nice and straight in one place, but then you can plan on it going crooked in other areas of the room.

So it becomes a game of priorities… Do I keep the pattern plumb/level, or do I keep the pattern match intact?

Look at the photo of the wallpaper against the ceiling line, and you will see the pattern dropping down as it moves to the left. That doesn’t look great – but it’s not really all that noticeable or offensive.

Now look at the photo of the corner. The pattern matches perfectly. To get the pattern to match, I had to hang the paper to the left of the corner off-plumb, and that’s what threw the pattern at the ceiling line off-level and caused it to drop down as it moved to the left (mentioned above).

Mis-matched wallpaper patterns are eye-jarring, even in corners. I think it’s better to have the design match in the corners, then to worry about how it is moving along the ceiling line, or how it’s meeting up against other walls in other corners.

This wallpaper is by Waverly, which is made by York, and is in the Sure Strip line, a product that I particularly like. It was bought at below retail price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. She is great at helping you find just the perfect paper! Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Jungle View With Vaulted Ceilings

February 11, 2017
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The ceiling of this home office on the third floor of a newish home in the Rice University / Museum District of Houston has some interesting angles and spaces. But there is no window in the room. The homeowner thought the space was stark and claustrophobic. So she came up with the idea to open up the space with a verdant foliage pattern.

The palm leaf paper went on the two large angled spaces over where the desk / computer will sit. Then a companion paper was chosen for the two smaller angled areas flanking the desk area.

I love using two coordinating papers in one space. And the green leaves really do open up the space, and bring a bit of the outdoors in.

Angled spaces like this eat up a lot of paper, so plan for a lot of waste.

Both these wallpaper patterns are by Designer Wallpapers, and were bought at below retail price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. She is great at helping you find just the perfect paper! Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Silvery Pearlized Faux Bois in a Very Complicated Powder Room

February 10, 2017
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This under-the-stairs powder room has a LOT of challenges: angles, nooks, turns, and a pedestal sink, not to mention those odd “columns” running through the ceiling. The homeowner wanted all surfaces covered, so I suggested a non-directional pattern. This faux bois fills the bill, because it looks virtually the same right side up or upside down. She also likes the “faux bois” (fake wood) look, and really loves the shimmery, silvery, pearly sheen of the silver-on-white colors.

So the pattern suits the room, and the homeowner loves the color; unfortunately, the paper itself was a true test.

This wallpaper is one of the newer non-woven materials, and it is intended that the installer paste the wall, rather than paste the wallpaper. However, this paper is thick, stiff, unmalleable, and creases easily. All this works fine on a flat accent wall. But problems arise when you try to paste a thick, stiff, unmalleable, easily-creased paper onto the walls of a very complicated room.

What makes a room complicated? Corners, angles, steep angles, ceilings, light fixtures that cannot be removed, and weird “beams” that appear to serve no purpose other than to madden the paperhanger. Oh, and let’s not forget that pedestal sink. This 12 single roll powder room (6 bolts) took me 12 hours to hang.

This was a paste-the-wall material, but I found that pasting the paper instead made it more pliable and workable. Most strips required multiple relief cuts, so I could work the paper against fixtures and into corners without creasing it.

The first strip I attempted to hang was around the pedestal sink, and then moving into the corner to the right. The paper simply would not allow me to manipulate it into position, and the ensuing struggle resulted in creases, cuts, blemishes, gaps at the seams, and all sorts of unacceptable results.

So I ripped that strip off and started over.

To get around the sink with minimal relief cuts or stress on the paper, I trimmed the strips vertically, to cut them into two narrower, more manageable sections. All other handling was done slowly and carefully, to put as little stress on the paper as possible, and to minimize the potential of creasing. It was still difficult to fold the paper into corners and trim.

Matching the pattern was difficult, because the silvery sheen of the ink combined with sun coming in through the windows and harsh lighting in the powder room made it virtually impossible to see any part of the pattern, much less match one jagged bit of tree bark on the wall to it’s counterpart going onto the ceiling.

The “beams” built into the ceiling, and the recessed areas behind them, were very difficult, too. The stiff paper didn’t want to bend around or stick to the slightly un-straight edges. Wrapping certain areas with wallpaper meant that other adjoining areas could not be covered with the same strip, so they had to be patched in – difficult to explain, but trust me, it was tedious, time-consuming, and took a lot of plotting and planning before any approach could be begun. Oh, and wrestling with cantankerous bull-nosed edges around the door.

In the end, the room looks great. The few mismatched areas and other imperfections just blend in with the wild pattern and shiny ink, so you don’t even notice them.

Next time, though, I will encourage the homeowner to get not only non-directional pattern, but a paper that is thin and pliable.

I hung this in the powder room of a newish home in the Museum District / Rice University area of Houston. This wallpaper pattern is by Thibaut Designs, in the Anna French line, is called “Surrey Woods,” and was bought at below retail price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. She is great at helping you find just the perfect paper! Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

From Staid to Wild and Adventurous

December 15, 2016
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This powder room is in one of the traditional Georgian style homes that were popular with builders in the West University Place area in the 1990’s. The original tufted-wall wallpaper went perfectly with that era and style home. But the new owners are a young couple with school age children, and the mom wanted some “Wow!” factor. She fell in love with this bold stripe. What makes it unique are the child-like swaths of color in between the black stripes.

The original dark red paper was on all walls, the sloped ceiling under the stairs, and even the ceiling itself. To me, it seemed dark and crowded. The homeowner agreed with me to not repaper the small flat ceiling area. But there was a lot of debate over whether or not to paper the sloped section. Once all the walls were papered, I tacked some strips to the ceiling, so she could get a feel for how the room would look and feel with paper overhead. The decision was to go ahead!

I don’t usually like wallpaper on overhead areas, but this time I have to say that I think she made the right choice.

This McKenzie Childs wallpaper pattern is a bold choice for this small room, and will take some accessorizing to really make it work. There is a huge rectangular mirror that almost totally covers the wall behind the sink. The medium-brown vanity will be painted a soft smoky blue, to coordinate with the blue in the paper. And the wall that faces you when you walk into the room will get a large piece of abstract art, with reds, yellows, greens, blues, and, of course, black, which will really stand out against the paper.

And that’s just what the homeowner wanted … opening the door to the powder room and stepping into a wild and unexpected experience.

Making A Statement Coming Up The Stairs

October 7, 2016
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The lady of the house (a “tall skinny house” in the Houston Heights neighborhood), has a super eye for decorating, and the first floor looks like it was decorated by a highly-trained professional interior designer – but it is all the work of the homeowner.

But she thought that coming up the stairs to the second floor, the upstairs just looked boring. This short hallway is what you see as you walk up the stairs. With the beautiful woodwork and paint, it’s attractive, but it is boring. The homeowner found this fun palm-frond pattern via Anthropologie, and knew it would be perfect for this space.

She mentioned putting it on the ceiling, too, and I tried to talk her out of it, because I think that wallpaper on the ceiling crunches the ceiling down and makes the space claustrophobic. I also had not included the ceiling when I measured the room, so I didn’t think we would have enough paper to cover that additional surface.

But I could tell that she really wanted the paper on the ceiling, so I did some plotting and measuring and engineering, and managed to cover the ceiling and the walls with the paper that we had.

Once it was up, and when I stood on the stairs and looked forward, I have to admit – the gal’s decorating sense was spot-on – papering the ceiling was the perfect treatment!

One reason the pattern works so well here is because of the white crown molding breaking up the pattern on the walls from the pattern on the ceiling. If there were no crown molding, and the palm fronds on the walls connected to the fronds on the ceiling, I think it would have been too busy. (We also would not have had enough paper, due to having to match the pattern on the wall so it lines up with the pattern on the ceiling, which would have eaten up a lot more paper.)

This wallpaper is pre-pasted, and is in the Sure-Strip line (which I really like) by York Wallcoverings, and was purchased through Anthropologie.

Small Print, Shimmery Finish Brightens a Powder Room

September 2, 2016
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This ’90’s home in West University Place (Houston) is being remodeled, and the homeowners wanted the wallpaper put up before the plumbing fixtures went into the room. I was happy, because it is sooo much easier to hang paper when you don’t have to work around the toilet and sink. The vanity is particularly tricky, because it stands on four tall legs and is open underneath, so you have to cut around the legs and pipes.

This small pattern and two-tone color scheme does not overwhelm the room, but adds sparkle and personality. The homeowner and I decided it would look better on that sloped part of the ceiling, even though there is no crown molding at the top.

This pattern is by G P & J Baker, a British manufacturer, called “Flora,” pattern # PW 4507. It is a thick, somewhat stiff, and somewhat spongy non-woven material, and is a paste-the- wall product.

This Is How I Paper A Ceiling

August 16, 2016
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I don’t wallpaper many ceilings, and when I do, I try to stick to small powder rooms and the like. Larger and higher ceilings are much easier when you have scaffolding and / or a helper – and I have neither.

However, I did this ceiling recently, and used this method … Using two ladders facing one another, I can work on a section and then walk across to the next ladder and reach another section of ceiling. When I’ve done all I can reach, I use push pins to hold the folded paper to the ceiling, get down and move the ladders so I can reach the next 6′ or so.

Normally, pasted paper is “booked” in two folds, one being 1/3 the strip of paper and the other being 2/3 of the strip. In the second photo you can see the more numerous and shorter accordion folds that I use when papering a ceiling. This enables me to unbook only as much paper as I can position onto a section of ceiling. Then I get down and move the ladder, and then unbook another short section of paper. This is much easier than trying to wrestle with a 9′ long strip of pasted paper.

Wallpapering Ceilings With a Fan

August 16, 2016

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Note to Self: The next time a homeowner wants you to put wallpaper on her ceiling, you must insist that they have the ceiling fan removed. Or, at very minimum, have someone remove the blades.

Working two strips of wallpaper around this ceiling fan must have taken nearly two full hours.

The good news is, all went well, with no tears or going off-plumb.