Posts Tagged ‘cole & son’

What Are Those Wrinkles in the Wallpaper?!

January 24, 2023

Un-Plumb, Un-Level

January 24, 2023
Shot of the finished breakfast room , for pattern reference.
Close-up view. The vertical lines are not wrinkles , but shadows cast by the macrame light fixture in this breakfast room .
The problem is, when walls aren’t plumb , and ceiling and floor and chair rail are not level , the pattern motifs won’t march across the wall at the same height on every strip . I’ve learned that, in most cases, it’s more important to match the pattern in the corner , and then allow the pattern to go off-track at ceiling or floor if necessary.
In this photo, note that the humming bird is sitting completely above the chair rail.
Here he’s dropped down to where his tail is swallowed up by the chair rail .
By the time we get to the left corner , half of the bird has dropped down and disappeared .
Here’s another bird motif doing the same disappearing act .
Feet and belly gone.
This house in the Eastwood neighborhood of Houston is nearly 85 years, so you can expect some settling and shifting on its foundation . But even brand new homes can have walls that are out of whack .
This beautiful pattern is by Cole & Son and is called Hummingbirds – it’s very popular and has been around more than 100 years … that’s older than the house!

Pretty , Airy Humming Birds on Breakfast Nook Walls

January 22, 2023
Before. Note that those vertical lines on the wall are cast by the macrame light fixture. You also see bench seating with storage underneath . There will be a wall-mounted table in the center . The wainscoting / chair rail is high enough to keep any food splashes or sticky fingers from staining the wallpaper .
Finished .

Whale of a Good Time in Little Boy’s Bedroom

September 30, 2022
Before shot of accent wall in little boy’s room in a nicely renovated 1920’s home in the Houston Heights .
Done. This is a good background wallpaper pattern , because the colors are muted and the design is overall and relatively calm.
Bunk beds will be coming soon.
The little tyke is in to all things nautical , so whales and a little whimsey are just the ticket.
Waves , whales , turtles , fish , turbulent seas … this looks like an artist’s ink or pencil drawing .
The design is ” Melville ” and it’s by Cole & Son , a British manufacturer known for good quality and affordable non-woven paste-the-wall wallpapers . Their designs run the gamut from traditional to fun to even a bit kooky .

Inexplicable Pattern Match

July 17, 2022
This happens not infrequently, and it’s puzzling to me. At the top of the wall, the pattern match drops down to the right.
Yet at the center of the wall it matches perfectly.
But get to the bottom of the wall and it drops again, but this time to the left.

Yes, some papers do stretch / expand when they get wet with paste. But that’s not the situation here, because this is A.) a non-woven material, which generally do not expand, and B.) every strip was treated the same way. In other words, if every strip is pasted, booked, and left to sit for the same length of time, ALL the strips should expand the same amount, right? And the pattern should match at the top, middle, and bottom. Right?

But even that argument doesn’t apply, because this, again, is a NW / non-expansion material, and, besides, I didn’t paste the wallpaper but pasted the wall instead. So the material had no chance to get wet or swollen with paste.

I believe this is a factory trimming issue. Somewhere along the line, the trimmers got off-track, or started trimming on the bias, just enough to throw off the pattern match.

In cases like this, the rule of thumb industry standard is to match the pattern as best as possible at eye level (middle of the wall) and let nature take its course, as they say, on the upper and lower sections.

Luckily this particular pattern only had one motif area that matched across the seams, and there were only three of those per the height of each strip. So the two slight mis-matches were both way above and below eye level, so not very noticeable.

This pattern is called Palm Leaves and is by Cole & Son . Other than this printing snafu, it’s a good quality wallpaper. See previous post

Palm Leaf Accent Wall

July 16, 2022
Finished living room accent wall. This was a looong wall – 24′ wide. It took 14 strips of wallpaper!
Before. I’m getting ready to skim-float the textured wall to smooth it, then apply a wallpaper primer .
Ready to hang, with my “A” and “B” strips lined up in the order they will be hung.
This is a paste-the-wall product, and I like to roll them backwards so the surface doesn’t bop into the paste as I position the strips on the wall. I secure with elastic head bands from the dollar store.
First strip starts in the center of the wall, both to balance the pattern. But also because the ceiling line is way not level and the pattern will go off-track at the ceiling, this will minimize the tracking by spreading it outward 12′ each way from the center. If I start at one corner, the tracking would be a lot more noticeable by the time it crossed the whole 24′ of wall.
Close up.
This is simply called Palm Leaves and is by Cole & Son , a good brand. It’s a non-woven material and is designed to strip off the wall easily and with minimal damage when you redecorate. It’s also a little more durable and stain-resistant than paper wallpapers. It was very nice to work with.
The home is in the Westbury area of Houston.
The couple has mid-century modern furnishings, and this wall looks fantastic as a backdrop !

Wallpaper in Southern Living Magazine

April 12, 2022
I love the way this syncs with the verdure outside the window.
Cole & Son is a British company, with good quality, medium-priced wallpaper.
Brunschwig and Fils is a long-standing French company making higher-end goods – which can be a bit tricky to work with.

This was the April 2022 issue of Southern Living.

Monkeying Around With Forbidden Fruit

October 27, 2021
Powder room before.
Whoah … this is really COOL! I love the colors against the blue woodwork. The homeowner is debating what color to paint the vanity base.
This wallpaper is in the Fornasetti collection by Cole & Son. It’s called ” Frutto Proibito “

Like most papers by this manufacturer, this was a non-woven material. The instructions say to paste the wall, but this brand is known to expand when wet with paste, so it’s better to paste the material.

The home is in the Heights area of Houston, and is a nicely updated older bungalow.

‘Iconic’ Woods Pattern by Cole & Son on Heights Entryway Accent Wall

October 20, 2021
Before. Getting ready to prime. Note that I have protected both the floor and the baseboards with dropcloths.
Done! Dramatic!
Detail.
This bolt had been damaged in shipping, and the right edge had dings / dents. With this thick, puffy non-woven material, these could show at the seams when butted against the next strip. So I plotted the placement of my strips so this one would be on the far right end. That last strip was not the full width wide, so 8″ of the right side got cut off where it met the adjoining wall. That eliminated the worry of those dented edges showing.
I used the paste-the-wall method to hang this non-woven wallpaper. With the wall wet with paste, it would be easy to get paste all over the wallpaper if you used the traditional installation booking technique. So I’ve learned to roll the material up with the print side in, and then secure with a hairband (from the dollar store). Then you can easily carry the rolled-up strip up your ladder, remove the elastic tie, and then let the paper fall into place. Only the back side comes into contact with the paste on the wall. Once you get good at this technique, you will never have to wipe paste off a seam, nor off the woodwork or adjoining walls.
Cole & Son says that this “Woods” pattern has roots dating back to 1959. I guess that makes it truly iconic. I can say that it is quite popular – I’ve hung it a bunch of times.

Cole & Son Florencecourt in Meyerland (Houston) Powder Room

September 3, 2021
Before, primed and ready for wallpaper.
After.
I love the muted charcoal-and-cream colors with the marble vanity top. In addition, there are small brown flecks here and there, which help tie it to the floor tiles and the burnished gold mirror.
The pattern has a slight “raised ink” texture – hard to see here, but lovely in person.

This is a non-woven material. It can be hung with the paste-the-wall method, but I wanted the flexibility created by pasting the paper.

Cole and Son is a British company. Most everything they make is very nice.