Posts Tagged ‘craft paint’

Preventing White From Showing At The Seams

July 8, 2021
Chalk pastels for coloring the edges of the wallpaper. (Do NOT use oil pastels – they stain wallpaper.)
Craft paint from the hobby store used to stripe the wall where the wallpaper seams will fall. Note the red vertical line from my laser level, which serves as a guide. I use a small square of dampened sponge to wipe on the paint. Be sure to let it dry before hanging the paper.

Manufacturers have a bad habit of printing dark wallpapers on white substrates. Since wallpaper expands when it gets wet with paste, and then shrinks as it dries, you have the potential for the white edges of the paper showing at the seams. There is also the possibility that the white wall behind the paper will be exposed, too.

To minimize these chances, I use chalk pastels to color the edges of the wallpaper, and diluted craft paint to stripe under where the seams will fall.

Wallpaper Seams Split – White Showing At Seams

March 31, 2020


I hung this Bradbury & Bradbury digitally-printed wallpaper from their new ’20’s Vintage collection yesterday. When I left, the seams were perfect, and the job looked super.

Yet overnight, the paper dried and shrank, and that left some gaps at the seams. In the top photo, you can see the white primer peeking out from underneath. (Note: I have not had any opened seams when I hung their more traditionally-printed papers, including a dark brown paper in my own master bathroom.)

If the paper is allowing of it, it is possible to use craft paint or chalk pastels to color in the open space between the edges of the two strips of paper.

You have to test before moving forward, because some papers have a porous surface that might absorb the colorant and leave a mar or smudge on the surface. Usually, chalk is the safest way to go.

The Corner’s Crooked, The Pattern’s Gone Wonky – But There Is A Fix

November 21, 2017

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Walls aren’t always plumb, horizontal surfaces (ceilings, floors, countertops) aren’t always level, and wet wallpaper can twist out of shape. Look down the center of the top photo, and you’ll see how poorly the pattern matches in a corner that is off-plumb by more than half an inch from top to bottom. Notice the double-images in the upper part of the picture.

When hanging the strip to the right of the corner, I could have manipulated the paper so that the pattern matched perfectly. But that would have meant hanging the strip off-plumb – and that would have meant that every subsequent strip would be off-plumb. And that would have meant that the design motifs would begin tracking down the wall.

Meaning that, the red leaves I plotted to sit at the top of the wall would begin walking their way down, further and further from the ceiling line. The whole wall would have a lopsided and off-kilter look.

I chose to keep the red leaves in their assigned position at the top of the wall. The trade-off was the mis-matched pattern you see in the corner in the top photo.

But I have a few tricks up my sleeve. Let’s just say that some craft paint, a tiny artist’s brush, a sharp scissors and a few appliqu├ęs, time, patience, and a good pair of strong reading glasses did their magic.

Hiding a White Line

November 1, 2015

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The walls of this bedroom were textured, so, to smooth them, I troweled on white joint compound. To get a smooth and snug “nest” for the wallpaper to lie in, I like to wrap the mud just a little onto the ceiling, and smooth it down with my finger. This creates a good grip for the wallpaper – but it also leaves just a little white compound on the tan ceiling.

I didn’t want that line to show all along the top of the new wallpaper, so I got some craft paints, mixed up a color that matched the wall, thinned it a little, and used a small brush to swipe it on. White line – GONE!

Disguising a Bowed Wall

October 4, 2015

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When hanging wallpaper, you (generally) never wrap a full-width strip of paper around an inside corner. Instead, you cut the piece into two strips, measuring and trimming carefully so the first strip will wrap about 1/16″ around the corner, and then you butt the second strip into the corner, overlapping that little bit that is wrapped around the corner.

One thing that can throw the pattern match off is if the wall is bowed. Then a differing amount of the pattern could wrap the corner at the top of the wall, compared to what appears at the bottom of the wall. That is what happened here. The pattern matches perfectly in the corner for the first 7.5 feet (not shown), but begins to gap as you get close to the floor.

Twisting the paper to conform is not an option, because it causes wrinkles, creates torque, and distorts the opposite edge, making it difficult for the next strip of wallpaper to butt up correctly.

Thus, we ended up with this slightly mis-matched pattern in the corner near the bottom of the wall. (Photo I) To keep this mis-match from jarring the eye, I dug into my trusty stash of craft paint, found my tiniest paint brush, and filled in the gaps. (Photo III)