Posts Tagged ‘degloss’

Paint Must Be De-Glossed Before Adding A New Coat On Top

September 29, 2020


The original paint in both these photos was a gloss or semi-gloss. When it came time to update, someone applied a coat of new paint right on top. Then the floor guys came and stained the floor. To protect the new paint, they applied painter’s tape. Unfortunately, when the tape was removed, it took some of the new paint along with it.

Believe it or not, even something as relatively gentle as wiping wallpaper paste off the woodwork is enough to cause poorly-adhered paint to delaminate.

This happens because the new coat of paint was not given a sound surface to grab ahold of and adhere to.

To have properly prepared the original gloss paint to accept the new coat of white paint, the painter should have done one or more of the below:

1.) Sanded the paint to knock off the gloss. This leaves dust residue, so that dust will need to be wiped off with a damp rag or sponge (rinsed clean frequently) or a Tack Cloth.

2.) Wiped down with liquid chemical deglosser, such as Liquid Sandpaper.

3.) Primed with a bonding primer, formulated to stick to glossy surfaces, and also formulated to serve as an appropriate base for the new paint.

A primer is also not a bad idea to follow up in the case of 1.) and 2.) above.

Yes, all of this is a whole lot of work, and it creates dust and/or odors, takes more time, and adds cost.

But it’s a step well worth the investment, because properly prepped and painted surfaces will hold up and look professional for decades to come.

Why Is This Paint Peeling Off The Woodwork?!

August 12, 2014

Digital ImageSee the paint peeling off the woodwork? This happened when the hose from my Shop Vac brushed against the molding, and also when I removed blue painter’s tape that was holding plastic sheeting across the doorway.

A couple of things are going on. First of all, this is latex paint put over old oil based paint, which is not a good combination.

Second, and most important, the painter failed to properly prep the woodwork before painting. This woodwork in this 1950’s home was originally painted with oil-based enamel (wonderful stuff, IMO). But it is glossy and hard, and new paint will not stick to it. So it is essential that the old paint be either sanded (and then wiped clean of dust), or wiped with a chemical deglosser, to remove the sheen, so the new paint has something to grab and hold on to.

Latex paint is also not a good choice, IMO, because it’s not sticky enough, and because it is too rubbery and plasticy. An acrylic paint is preferable, and brushes can still be washed up with soap and water. Of course, I’m something of an old-school gal, and I think that when painting woodwork, oil-based the best way to go. Even then, you still MUST properly prep the surface, meaning sanding and deglossing and wiping off the dust.