Posts Tagged ‘door’

Shells / Fans in Master Bedroom Closet

June 21, 2022
Left side of entry wall primed and ready for wallpaper.
Starting the right side of the wall.
Instead of laying a 9.5′ length of wallpaper down along the door frame and wrestling it around the tops and bottoms of several fixed-in-place shelves, I used a razor blade and my straightedge to slice the strip horizontally into sections, measured carefully to coincide with the position of the shelf brackets.
This way I was working with much smaller and more manageable chunks of paper.
Entry wall finished.
Entry and side walls finished.
Opposite, window wall finished.
This closet, with 20 single rolls (10 double roll bolts) of wallpaper, several fixed shelves to wrangle paper around, support brackets to trim around, and two windows to wrap wallpaper inside, took me two 10-hour days to prime and paper.
Here’s a close-up, with a light switch for perspective, to show the lightly textured surface of the wallpaper.
BN European brand of wallpaper.
This is a non-woven material and could be hung via the paste the wall method or the paste the paper installation process.
Pasting the material made it much easier to work around all the obstacles and tight areas.
The paper was very soft and pliable. It is an embossed ( textured ) vinyl and will be more resistant to stains and dings than most traditional wallpapers.
This home is in the Heights neighborhood of Houston.

Using a Scrap to Save a Full-Length Strip

April 3, 2022
It was going to use up a whole 21″ wide x 9′ long strip of wallpaper to cover this narrow section between the door molding and the wall. I didn’t want to use just a little and then throw away most of that strip. I also didn’t want to wrestle a 21″ wide strip into that narrow space.
So I cut the piece over the door and left just a bit hanging below the door. I trimmed this bottom edge along a part of the design.
But I had some scrap paper from another area in the room, so used that. I found the pattern that matched the area above the door and trimmed the right edge along the corresponding design. Then I cut a 1 5/8″ wide strip long enough to snake down between the door and the wall. I trimmed the top to match the bottom of the piece over the door.
A little bit of this narrow strip overlaps the bottom of the wallpaper that was already on the wall.
Here’s how it looks going down the side of the door.
This dachshund dog pattern is called Tillsammans and is in the Studio Lisa Bengtsson collection. Made in Sweden, a non-woven product and a paste-the-wall installation method.

Kill Point Over Door, Ridge, More

February 25, 2022
After you’ve hung wallpaper on all the walls in a room, the point where your last strip meets up with the first strip is called the kill point . This virtually always ends up in a pattern mis-match. That’s why you engineer to place it in an inconspicuous place, such as behind a door.
This powder room, though, had no hidden corner or handy door. That meant that I would have a pattern mis-match a full 5′ high, to the left of the toilet you see here. I prefer to have the pattern match in a corner like this. As you can see – it does. I will explain how I accomplished that.
I decided to place the kill point over the door. Even though this space is 2′ high and a mis-match might be noticeable, not many people are looking up over the door, so it’s a better choice than in a 5′ or 9′ long corner.
The dark smudges on the wall in the photo are where I’ve spread paint, to prevent white walls from peeking out, should the dark wallpaper shrink as the paste dries.
Here I’ve positioned the strip on the left. This leaves a gap of about 3″. Once I match the new strip up to the piece on the right, its pattern will not match perfectly with the strip on the left.
Now I’ve positioned both strips, and the one on the right is overlapping the one on the left.
Here’s an idea of what the pattern mis-match will look like. To be honest, it’s not all that bad, with this busy pattern and being up over the door. Still, I thought I could make it look better.
I’m going to do a double cut , which is our installers’ fancy term for a splice. I’m going to cut through the two strips, splicing them together, cutting along the vertical foliage elements, to minimize cut-off motifs and to disguise the splice.
When double cutting on the wall, it’s really important that you slice through the two layers of wallpaper only , and not cut into the primer or wall surface beneath. This is because, if the wall surface becomes scored or compromised, when the wallpaper paste dries and the paper shrinks and pulls taught, it can put tension on the wall surface. If the surface is not intact, it can give way and actually come apart ( delaminate ), resulting in wallpaper that comes away from the wall – and there’s nothing beneath it to paste it back to.
I’ve blogged about this before, so do a Search here to learn more. It’s important!
Anyway, to protect the wall beneath where I will make my splice cut, I’ve placed three layers of scrap wallpaper, to pad the wall. I figure I can cut through the two top layers, but not all five.
Note that three layers of non-woven material have some thickness, and can “throw off” the splice cut and prevent the top two strips from fitting together perfectly. In this case, the paper is flexible enough that I’m not worried about that particular scenario.
The strips are in place, and I’m ready to make my cut. I prefer to use a single-edged razor blade held in my fingers, rather than a blade-holder. What’s most important is that the blade be brand new and spankin’ sharp!
Here I’ve made my cut and am removing excess paper from the right side of the top strip. Look carefully and you can see how my razor blade followed the contours of the vertical foliage design elements.
Here I’ve removed the excess paper from the left edge of the bottom strip. You can see they are poised to fit together nicely.
Before fitting the two strips back together, though, I’m examining the wall surface. Check the photo carefully, and you’ll see that I did, after all, score into the primer. 😦 The surface below is skim-coat that was used to smooth a textured wall – and another potential layer that may come apart when exposed to tension from the drying wallpaper.
Shoulda used a Boggess Strip. https://www.steveboggesspaperhanging.com/lexanpage.htm
One way to prevent the wall from delaminating is to put something over the compromised area, to distribute the tension of the drying paper and take it away from the cut wall. Here I’ve taken a scrap of wallpaper, which is a tough non-woven material, and carefully peeled the printed surface from the white substrate (no pic of that process). Now I have a thin material that I can use to pad the wall.
I’m using the black printed side facing out, in case the spliced strips shrink a little – anything peeping out will be black and not noticeable.
Here is the bit of paper in place, spanning across the cut on the wall.
Now I’ve smoothed the two top strips back into place. Since my double cut followed along the vertical foliage elements as much as possible, and because I cut around the gold flowers to keep them full and round, the pattern looks like it matches up just about perfectly.
But wait! … What’s that lump / ridge under the wallpaper, the full height of the seam? That’s my seam padding! Doesn’t look great.
I’m really surprised at this. The non-woven wallpaper material is thick. But that’s why I pulled the top and bottom layers apart, to make my patch piece thinner. I guess not thin enough. Once dried, this ridge is going to be obvious.
But, to be honest, this is up over a door where no one’s going to be spending much time looking. In addition, once I get my 100 watt light bulb out of there and replace the homeowners’ original, small light fixture, this bump under the wallpaper will be pretty much indiscernable.
Still, that lump was buggin’ me. Another invention from my colleague Steve Bogges to the rescue! Pictured is his seam tape , which was made specifically for this type situation. This is very thin – yet strong – paper tape that is used to bridge cut areas like this, and prevent tension from drying wallpaper from tugging at unstable walls.
The tape has a pre-pasted side (the gloss you see), and feathered edges, to make it less noticeable under wallpaper.
Hard to see, but here I’ve placed the seam tape over the cut wall areas
Now the two top strips have been smoothed back into place. Amazingly, no bump from the seam tape beneath shows. And the pattern mis-match is barely visible, too.
Win-win!
All that’s left to do is to wipe paste off the surface of the wallpaper. This overlapping and splicing does mean that wallpaper paste will get on the surface of the strip underneath. Actually, there is a way to prevent that, and it also involves products from Steve Boggess
But … that’s a blog post for another day …
This pattern is called Peonies and is by Rifle Paper.

Graffiti Garage Doors – Boys’ Room

January 19, 2022
Boys’ accent wall smoothed, primed, and read for wallpaper.
Just – WOW!
Close-up. This really looks like a painted metal industrial door!
Each boy has a bed shaped like a race car. Temporarily tumped on its side while the mural goes up.
Standing on end, until the Wallpaper Lady finishes.

The mural was purchased on-line from one of those middle-man sites that I recommend against. There was scant information, and no installation instructions. But it turned out to be a very nice product and I enjoyed working with it.

Fun Kill Point With Schumacher Versailles

December 3, 2021
The kill point is your last corner in a room, where your last strip of wallpaper meets up with the first strip you hung hours ago. This virtually always results in a pattern mis-match, In the photo above, if I were to add the next strip of wallpaper to the right of the striped section, in the order it’s supposed to be hung, a mis-match would result when that design lands in the corner and bumps against the leaves and flowers to the right.
I thought I could make it look better. Instead of matching the pattern in proper sequence coming from the left, I decided to cut a fresh strip and match it with the strip on the right.
This gave me a perfect pattern match. But left me with a 1″ gap between the strips.
I could fill that gap in with a strip of plain blue paper, cut from scrap wallpaper in the trash pile. But this particular pattern didn’t have any areas with 1″ width of unprinted paper. So I used my straightedge and a razor blade and cut two 1/2″ wide strips of paper the height of this area over the door.
Here I have placed the first of these next to the strip on the right.
Here I have butted the second 1/2″ strip up against the first one, and am tucking it underneath the striped strip to its left. The vertical lines in the design will disguise any ridges caused by the overlap. Besides – who’s gonna notice this 9′ up, anyway?
Here it is, finished and smoothed into place. Note that these strips are still wet, and will be homogeneous in color once they all dry.
Here’s the finished corner. Remember – it still needs to dry. You can’t notice that there’s an inch of extra blue space in there.
From a distance.

The Four Hour Fireplace Wall

December 1, 2021

Why? Getting the pattern centered, working out the logistics of the width of the wallpaper and the width of the wall (left me with 2″ strips on either side), the narrow strips between the firebox and the door molding, and the decorative moldings to trim around, some with as little as 1/2″ clearance.

Tropical Foliage Re-Do – Peel & Stick Debacle UnDone

November 26, 2021
Re my previous post about an under-the-stairs powder room that the homeowners attempted to install an argumentative peel & stick material … here is the finished room after I stripped off the P&S, smoothed the walls, and hung the new wallpaper choice. I engineered to place the sole philodendron leaf down the center of the ceiling.
Where the under-the-stairs ceiling met the area over the door, the two surfaces came together in a very sharp angle. It was difficult to get in there and work, and to get the paper tight into the joint. Fingers can be too fat, so this is where tools can squeeze in there and save the day. This is also my kill point . Do a search here on that term for more info. A long story and maybe an hour or more of work, but you will note that there are no pattern mis-matches here. The homeowners were out of town, so I felt unpressured and could take as long as I needed to make these three areas look seamless.
I love the hand-painted, water colory look of this pattern.
This photo shows the joint where the walls meet the sloped under-the-stairs ceiling. A wallpaper pattern will never match perfectly in these situations. At first, I tried a few tricks to ” fool the eye .” But I decided it looked crisper and less distracting to just trim the two papers where they met. Here, we had the advantage that the tropical foliage pattern was busy enough that, I mean, really, when you step three feet back, who’s gonna notice a minor pattern mis-match, anyway? The pattern does match in the corners on either side behind the toilet, though (see photo). Even though this only 4.5″ high, it does lend subtle continuity to the room.
When I see Candice Olson, I fast forward to glitz and glam and glitter and shimmer. Here her tropical foliage design is a bit more main stream. York is the mother company, and I love their products.

This home is in the Heights neighborhood of central Houston.

“Shrinking” a Strip of Wallpaper, to Avoid a Bad Seam Placement

August 1, 2021
The strip on the left over the door was going to extend to the right, about 2″ beyond the door frame and wall corner. This was going to result in an awkward seam placement, and make for a difficult install of the next two strips. I could avoid this by moving that next seam to over the right corner of the door. To do this, I had to “shrink” the strip over the door. I cut along the pattern, and pulled out the right half of the strip. Then I hung the full-length strip to the right, making sure to position the motifs so they would line up with the motifs on the left.
Here I am placing that right portion of the strip next to the full-height strip on the right. I am lapping it under the strip to the left. (The blue plastic tape you see at the top is to keep paste off the ceiling paint.)
Trimmed at ceiling and molding, and smoothed into place. Because I sliced the paper vertically along the design of the tree trunk, once the pieces are smoothed back into place, you don’t notice at all that about 1″ of material and pattern are missing.

Door Hidden by Wallpaper

July 4, 2021
You can just barely see the outline where the door is.

Here is a swinging door that leads from the dining room to the kitchen. The homeowners wanted it to “disappear,” and covering it with wallpaper was the perfect way to have it blend in with the other walls.

I won’t get into logistics, but the four strips of wallpaper needed to cover this space were complicated and tricky. I’d say I spent three hours on just this corner of the room.

Even though this was a non-woven “paste-the-wall” material, it worked much better to paste the paper, because then it became more pliable and cooperative.

The homeowners have sworn that they will place a small clear acrylic push-plate to keep people’s hands off the paper as they pass through.

The pattern is called “Pine” and the manufacturer is Sanderson. The home is in the Tanglewood / Galleria area of Houston.

Disguising Kill Point Over the Door

June 13, 2021

As you hang wallpaper around a room, your last corner, where your last strip meets up with the first strip (the “kill point”), virtually always results in a pattern mis-match. That’s why we try to place this in an obscure corner, or where it will be hidden by a door.

In this room, I could have put the kill point in the corner. But that would have left us with a pattern mis-match a full 9′ long, from ceiling to floor. Yeah, when the door was open against that wall, it would have obscured it. But I thought I could give this family a better look.

I moved the kill point to over the door.

I forgot to take a picture of how the final strip of paper would fall, so can’t show how the pattern would have mis-matched. That last strip was placed moving from left to right, as it butted against the strip to the left, and then landed on top of the strip on the right.

The design on the final strip didn’t match up with the strip on the right, so we ended up with a mis-match. This pattern is wild enough, and the 20″ high section up over the door is not really very obvious to anyone standing in the small room. But I just knew that I could make it look better.

I cut along the right edge of that final strip, tracing along the outline of the design. Once that was overlapped onto the existing strip, you could not detect a pattern mis-match. I did take to my scissors again to cut out a few additional tiny appliqués that I pasted on, to obscure one or two abrupt mis-match lines.

If you look closely, you’ll see that the design squares along that last seam are a bit closer together than they should be. But – who’s going to notice that? This is far better than a 9′ long pattern mis-match running the full height of the corner.