Posts Tagged ‘faucet’

Ogee Petals Wallpaper Pattern in a Powder Room

February 7, 2017
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“Ogee” means double continuous “S” pattern. This wallpaper pattern sure has them! It is also reminiscent of flower petals, and so has been called “Petals” in some of its incarnations. I hung the glass bead version a few months ago. https://wallpaperlady.wordpress.com/2016/10/30/swoopy-trellis-of-glass-beads-brightens-a-powder-room/ This no-bead paper was not as difficult, but it still was a tedious install.

My before shot disappeared, and so did my prep shot, so please just enjoy the pics of the finished project. Note the careful centering of the pattern on both the sink faucet. This was very time consuming, because I had to start with the strip to the left of the one over the sink, and carefully plot the width of the pattern and the rate of expansion of the wet paper; I won’t go into explaining it here, but I think it was well worth the 45 minutes it took to accomplish. The pattern is also centered nicely over the toilet.

The strip to the right of the mirror also took about 45 minutes, thanks to un-plumb walls, bowed walls, stiff unyielding paper, and more, in order to get the pattern to match at points both above and below the mirror, all the while keeping the right edge plumb, and straight enough for the next trip to be able to butt up against.

In the close-up shot, you see a slight pattern mis-match at the seams. The manufacturer had a mis-print issue, which was more noticeable in some rolls than others. I followed paperhanger protocol, and matched the pattern where it would be seen at eye-level, and I let points above and below fall out of match as they happened. Once the job was finished, I took some brown craft paint and a VERY tiny paint brush, and colored some of the mis-matched areas, to make them less noticeable to the human eye. It looked great.

I also ran a bead of clear caulk around the top of the backsplash, to prevent splashed water from being wicked up under the paper (which could cause curling).

This wallpaper pattern is by A-Street Prints, which is made by Brewster. I hung it in the powder room of a new home in the Meyerland neighborhood of Houston. It is a non-woven material, and it is meant that you paste the wall, rather than pasting the wallpaper.

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Wall-Mounted Faucets & Wallpaper

January 11, 2017
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Trimming wallpaper around plumbing fixtures can be tricky, and with fancy-dancy wall-mounted faucets and handles, it can be a real trial. The builder of this new home understand that. Plus he wanted the wallpaper to be as seamless as possible, without a lot of relief cuts (cuts made in the paper to allow the installer to work it into difficult positions).

So he let me put up the paper before the faucet and handles were installed. It was much easier for me, and it gave him an intact wallpaper surface, so no worries about visible cuts or about water finding its way into seams and causing curling.

Sorry the 2nd photo is so dark. There are some visible relief cuts in the paper, but they are small and close to the pipes, and will be covered by the plumbing fixtures.

Pretty Tub – Pretty Difficult Tub

May 10, 2016

Perry Bathtub

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This slightly-scooped, free-standing bathtub is aesthetically pleasing. But if you’re a paperhanger tasked with wallpapering the 9′ high walls with tricky-to-paper windows behind that tub, it is a bugger bear!

Normally, I protect the tub with padded moving blankets, and then lay a piece of plywood over the tub, and put my ladder on top of that. But with the curved edge of this tub, that would not work. Luckily, my ladder fit into the tub, and was tall enough that I could reach the top of both walls.

So much for the top of the walls.

I still needed to affix the wallpaper to the bottom half of the walls.

Squeezing my body down behind the tub, and squirming behind the floor-mounted faucet, and trying to move my arms and hands so I could smooth and trim wallpaper between the tub and the wall, well, that was an adventure in itself.

I’m glad I’m small. That’s all I can say.

But – We got ‘er done! 🙂

Look Maw – No Faucets!

April 23, 2016

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This wall with wall-mounted faucets over a vessel sink was much easier to paper, because the homeowner removed the faucet handles and spout for me.

If the fixtures had been in place, I would have had to make long relief cuts in the paper, to allow me to manipulate the paper around them. And the paper would have been trimmed to butt up against the faucet and spout. The long cuts and the edges against the metal are all places where there is the possibility of water getting behind the paper and causing curling or peeling.

Instead, with the fixtures removed, I was able to make small cuts so the paper fit neatly right up to the plumbing. And, once the faucets and spout are screwed back on, any cut edges of paper will be tucked safely behind them. No rough edges to look bad, no cut edges to curl up.

Because this wallpaper is a textured vinyl product of a commercial grade, there is no need to worry about the plumbing fixtures damaging the paper as they are screwed snugly back into place.

This faux woven grasscloth is water and stain resistant, and very durable. It is by Thibaut Designs, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Tricky Bathroom Faucets

November 21, 2015

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Needless to say, these plumbing fixtures should have been installed AFTER the wallpaper went up. It would have been much easier for me, and the paper would have gone right up to the pipes, eliminating relief cuts as well as the potential for paper to peel due to wicking of water into the substrate along those cut edges.

It would have been easiest for me to make three vertical cuts from the backsplash up to each handle / faucet, and then carefully trim around them. But that would leave three seams that were right where water will be splashed on them, opening the potential for them to absorb water and delaminate and curl, plus the possibility that the seams would be visible, and who wants three vertical seams 3″ apart?!

So what I did was, I made a horizontal cut from the right edge of the wallpaper to the center of the right handle, and then carefully trimmed around each fixture, while first making sure that, as the wallpaper came around the left side and then around the bottom of the faucets, that its horizontally cute edge met up with the horizontal cut I had made on the right. Meaning, that it met up with itself with no gaps of pattern mis-match.

Some of the fixtures were not tight against the wall, and I was able to slide the wallpaper behind them. In other areas, I had to trim right up against the metal. This always opens the potential for water to get behind and cause curling, so I used clear caulk to seal these areas.

This is a heavy vinyl wallpaper, which will be more durable than paper, because it is more resistant to water, which makes it a better choice for this particular application. Of course, if you want your faucets to come out of the wall, instead of the countertop, it would be best to put tile on the wall, rather than wallpaper. IMO

I was guestimating it would take about an hour to hang this one strip, but I think I finished a little quicker – say, 45 minutes. 🙂

Centering the Pattern

May 24, 2015
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In many cases, I like to center a main element of a wallpaper’s design on the wall. But it becomes complicated when, as in this powder room, the sink and faucet are a little off-center, the light fixture is not centered on the wall nor above the sink, and the main motif in the wallpaper is off-kilter, too…. The two Chinese men are not standing exactly in the middle of the pavilion.

So what to do? Do I place the pavilion in the middle of the wall, or do I center it over the sink, or do I center it under the light fixture? Do I center the pavilion on the wall, or the two men?

I decided to place the pavilion so its center lined up with the faucet. (Which, BTW, is on the left – the gizmo on the right is the handle.) But when I had the first strip up on the wall, it didn’t look right. It turned out that the two men were not centered under the pavilion. And since they are boldly colored and dominant, the whole thing looked off-balance.

So I pulled that strip off the wall, repasted it to keep it workable, and repositioned it on the wall so that the cloaks of the two men flanked the mid-point above the faucet.

It’s one of those things you can’t put your finger on. But you know that something is pleasing about how it looks when you face the sink and mirror.