Posts Tagged ‘gaps’

Water Color-y Mural In a Baby Girl’s Nursery – Accent Wall

February 17, 2017
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Here’s a delightful, softly colorful wall treatment for a soon-to-be-born baby girl. I love the way the flowers look fluid, as if they were brush strokes of water color. It is a mural, made up of six panels, rather than a typical wallpaper with a repeating design motif.

I hung this on one accent wall for behind the crib in a nursery of a newish home in Pearland. The wallpaper was bought on-line, and it came with no label, no instructions, no nothing. The homeowner told me name of the website, but – dang it! – I forgot the site and the brand name. 😦 I suspect that this may be a knock-off of a very similar pattern. Read on.

I have hung this pattern before, with pleasing results:

https://wallpaperlady.wordpress.com/2016/03/20/water-color-ful-wall-for-a-baby-girl/

and with slightly lesser-than-happy results:

https://wallpaperlady.wordpress.com/2016/08/25/water-color-flowers-for-a-little-girls-room/

Anyway, back to hanging the mural. First I smoothed the new suburban home typically heavyish textured wall, and primed with Gardz. (No photos, but similar to the previous two posts.)

In the 4th photo, I have laid out each strip, to be sure of which way is up, of the sequence to be placed on the wall, and to get exact measurements so I can compare them to the wall.

As for getting the paper onto the wall, I followed the protocol for pre-pasted papers, which is to run each strip through a water tray. I added a light coat of supplemental paste to the wall and at the edges (ceiling, baseboard, corners).

Similar to my last experience with this paper, I had what we call “overlaps and gaps” at the seams. See photos 5 and 6. In the 7th picture, you can clearly see that the paper has not been cut straight. Look closely just below the pink flower petal, and you will see that the seam butts perfectly, then jogs to the left in an overlap, then comes back to the right in a perfect butt.

When the manufacturer provides crooked seams, it’s impossible to make them butt together perfectly.

In addition, every seam had pattern mis-matches. In fact, none of the pattern matched perfectly across the 9′ height of the mural. The photo with the dark green leaf shows an example of this. You might think, “Just pull one strip up a little.” But then other elements of the design at other points along the seam would not match up. (Not pictured.)

The paper is simply poorly trimmed and poorly printed.

From a distance, you don’t notice any of this at all, and even close up, most homeowners don’t see it. But this mother-to-be was envisioning a perfect room for her first baby, and she paid a lot of money for the mural and installation – and she spotted the irregularities immediately.

With some of the overlapped seams, I was able to carefully trim off the lower layer, so they butted together better. And as the paper dried, I was able to push some of the seams together, as well as pull apart some of the overlaps. And I used my trusty No. 2 graphite pencil to fill in some of the mis-matched design at the seams.

In the end, the homeowner was happy with the room.

The crib and other baby’s furniture are white, and will look sweet and peaceful against this accent wall.

Why do I have no photos of the finished room? All this furniture is in the garage, still in boxes, waiting to be assembled.

Hmmm… Guess how this young couple is going to spend the weekend? 🙂

Brilliant Colors on a Dark Background

June 14, 2016
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This beautiful botanical and bird print is enhanced by rich colors in a matt finish on a deep chocolate background. I hung this in a remodeled powder room in the Galleria area (Houston), and it is just gorgeous.

I usually love Thibaut brand papers, but this one was thick and stiff, the edges had debris left from the machine trimming process, the seams didn’t butt up well, and it should have been printed on dark stock instead of the white backing.

What I did to minimize these things was to use a toothbrush to scrub the ends of the rolls to remove the flakes of paper. I striped dark paint the wall along where the seams would fall, to prevent the white wall from peeking through. I also used artist’s pastel to color the edges of the paper (see photo), to try to cover up the white paper backing. This was somewhat successful.

The seams had what we call “gaps and overlaps,” which means they butted well in some sections, gapped in others (see photo), and overlapped slightly in others. I wasn’t thrilled with the seams, but not every paper cooperates well, and most people don’t see what I see, anyway.

The overall effect is beautiful, and once the new vanity and the light sconces go in place, the room will be stunning. The homeowner is very happy.

This wallpaper pattern is by Thibaut Designs, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Avoiding White Seams With Dark Paper

June 7, 2016
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A dark wallpaper + white primer sometimes = teeny strips of white peeping out from between the seems. This is because the edges may not be cut perfectly straight by the manufacturer, or the natural variations in a textured product like grasscloth can result in uneven seams, or because wallpaper expands when it absorbs moisture from the paste, then shrinks just a tad as it dries.

One way to avoid that white gap is to stripe the wall with a similar color of paint.

You only have to do this where the seams will fall. In the top photo, I have measured the paper and plotted where the seams will lie, and am using my laser level to shoot a red line that I can follow while I swipe on a stripe of dark brown paint along the seam line.

In the second photo, you see the edge of the paper as it falls along the painted wall. The next photo shows a seam – but you don’t see any white. Mission accomplished!

This glittery grasscloth by Phillip Jeffries is pretty cool, so I’ve included a close up shot of it in the last photo.