Posts Tagged ‘gravity’

Tips On Hanging Wallpaper On A Ceiling

May 2, 2020
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image


After wallpaper is pasted, it is “booked,” which means folding pasted-side-to-pasted-side, usually sectioned off with the top 1/3 and then the bottom 2/3. Then the strip is taken to the wall and unfolded and then positioned and smoothed against the wall.

But when hanging a ceiling, which can be a much longer strip and with gravity working not with you but against you, I’ve found that accordion folds (see photo) make the strip much more manageable. Once the first section is in position on the ceiling, I use push pins to hold it temporarily in place, while I move along the ceiling, working the remainder of the strip into position, unfolding one section at a time.

Since I don’t have scaffolding, I set two ladders next to one another, so that I can step from one to the other (see photo), when enables me to smooth longer portions of the strip of wallpaper into position before having to get down on the floor and move the ladders further down the way.

Sorry – no pics of me unbooking those according folds or smoothing the paper against the ceiling … If I had taken my hands off the paper to pick up my camera, the whole strip would have peeled itself away from the wall!

Tall Walls and Awkward Spaces

March 28, 2020


This home office in a new, contemporary home in the Sunset Terrace / West University neighborhood of Houston has walls that were nearly 11′ high. In addition, there were bookcases and desks that I had to lean over in order to reach much of the wallspace.

My solution was to bring my 6′ ladder in addition to my usual 5′ ladder. By placing the shorter ladder on top of the desk counter, I was able get close enough and high enough to do the wall behind the desk.

I’m not quite 100lbs, so my weight and its distribution on the counter was not a worry.

To reach the area over the bookcases to the left, I had to do a combination of balancing on the 5′ ladder, and stepping onto the very top of the 6′ ladder, then leaning precariously, and placing a foot onto the shelves – without putting too much weight, because they were not securely attached.

You can be sure that I had to keep mindful of my center of gravity, how close the ladder was to the edge of that counter, how far I had to reach, how much backward torque that placed on the ladder, how stable the ladder was on its surface, and a whole lot more – all while also concentrating on getting the paper straight, trimmed, and smooth on the wall.