Posts Tagged ‘greymark construction’

How Many Birds In The Forest?

August 21, 2016
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It takes guts to put a dark paper in a small room. In this small hall bathroom, this pattern looks super! What helps this black wallpaper work is the white tile floor and shower surround, and a black vanity with a soft grey marble top. There are enough light colored surfaces to balance all the dark.

What’s extra cool is that this home is set on about an acre, and all the land is planted with foliage and large trees and looks quite wooded. The homeowner also owns an aviary with several types birds. So this woodland scene is perfect!

This paper is by Witch & Watchman, and is a non-woven material and uses a paste-the-wall process of installation. I ran black chalk along the edges, to hide the white backing, and that made the seams disappear.

I hung this in a home in Hedwig Village (Houston). The remodel work is being done by a company I work for from time to time, Greymark Construction, who does mighty fine work.

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Zebras Charging Through the Bath

November 16, 2014

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This zebra-and-arrow pattern is very old, and very loved. Scalamandre has been making it for a long time, in many colorways. Most of those colors are VERY difficult to work with. You see, the inks, combined with the paper substrate they are printed on, cause the seams to curl backwards (because the paper absorbs moisture and expands more than the ink does). My paperhanger buddies across the country who have hung the red and the gold and the green colorways have had real struggles to get the seams to lie down and to look good.

To be honest, after listening to the horror stories from them, I would not have touched it, if it were a printed paper. Except my client had chosen a silver grasscloth overprinted with the zebras. Grasscloth presents its own challenges, but at least you don’t have to worry about curling seams. So I took it on!

Still, it took a LONG time, probably 11 hours to hang (prep was already done) 8 rolls in a hall bath. Like many high-end goods, this paper came with a selvedge edge, which had to be precisely measured and trimmed off by hand. And it takes a LOT more effort to cut through grasscloth than paper.

Flat walls went OK. But the material was stiff and difficult to work with when it came to trimming around decorative moldings. AND… the beautifully remodeled bathroom included a console sink with chrome legs with non-removable support brackets, plus the plumber caulked the escutcheons to the wall so they had to be trimmed around neatly. (Usually you rough-cut around pipes, and the escutcheons cover it up.) It’s a good thing I’m short, because I must have spent an hour cross-legged under that sink, trimming around the brackets and pipes. 🙂

In the distant shot, you see two strips side-by-side. Note that the color difference between them is normal, and considered part of the “inherent natural beauty” of the product. All of the bolts were from the same run (printed at the same time), and still a color difference is to be expected. In fact, this paper was pretty much made to order, and the client had to wait a good couple of months for it to be printed and shipped.

The homeowner said to me, “I know you don’t like grasscloth’s visible seams, and the color difference between panels. But I don’t mind at all. I love LOVE it!”

The manufacturer is Scalamandre, and I hung this in a bathroom in a darling, nicely-remodeled-but-sensitive-to-its-roots bungalow in the Museum District. The work was done by Greymark Construction, whose work I really like, and whom I have worked with for more than a decade. In fact, I did a job last week in River Oaks where they had totally overhauled the entire housee. Leslie King is the owner. Yes, a woman! 😉 http://www.greymarkconstruction.com/

Beautiful Vintage Wallpaper

May 19, 2014

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Digital ImageThese two vintage wallpapers, plus a third, a multicolored small floral, were under the Sheetrock in the kitchen of a 1935 home in the Museum District that is being remodeled, where I’ll be hanging new paper in a few months.

In those days, before drywall, a type of cheesecloth was tacked over the shiplapped wooden walls, and the wallpaper was pasted and attached to that. That way, the outlines of the boards would not show. When they wanted to redecorate, they simply pasted new paper and put it right on top of the previous. That’s pretty much a no-no these days, and a pretty certain guarantee of bubbling, but it worked fine back then.

To me, it’s amazing how the colors stay vibrant and distinct, even in sunlight, over all these years. The designer was as delighted with these old papers as I am, and she let me snatch a few samples for my collection.

Interestingly, I have papered in the house next door, and in the house directly across the street – coincidences come in threes!

The interior designer is Jennifer Howard, and the remodeling contractor, whom I have worked with before and highly recommend, is Lesley at Greymark Construction.