Posts Tagged ‘kill point’

Over the Door Kill Point with a Stripe

July 11, 2017

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The “kill point” is where you land your last strip of wallpaper. When it meets up against your first strip – which is usually in a corner – it almost always results in a mis-match of the pattern. And pattern mis-matches catch and jar the eye. So that’s why you try to hide the kill point in a corner or behind a door, or somewhere where it won’t be prominently displayed.

But this bathroom didn’t have a “hidden” corner where the mis-match would not be noticed. I was going to end up with two 8′ lengths of the wide white stripes closer to each other than they should have been.

So I decided to match the pattern correctly in the corner, and then move the kill point up and away from eye-level – to over the door.

On the right side of the photo, you see the stripes at their normal width. As you move to the left, though, there is one stripe that is not the same width. This is my kill point.

The thing is, even though that stripe is narrower than the others, it doesn’t scream at you; your eye passes right over it.

Clever Kill Point

January 1, 2017
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The “kill point” in a room is the last corner, where your last strip of wallpaper comes to meet up with the first strip. It almost always results in a pattern mis-match, so you try to hide it in an inconspicuous place.

All of the corners in this bedroom went floor-to-ceiling, and the eye would really notice a 10′ mis-match. So I put the kill point at the top of this corner, about 2′ of mismatch. Then I wrapped the rest of the paper around the corner as I normally do, ending up at the right edge of the door molding. This way, I was able to keep the pattern matching perfectly for the lower 8′ of the corner. Where the lower paper meets the strip above the bar of the rolling door, the thick bar hides the 3″ overlap and mis-matched design .

The pattern motif below the bar does not line up vertically with the motif over the bar, but who the heck is going to notice that? And even the 2′ of mis-matched design at the top of the corner is hardly noticeable, due to the busy pattern.

Crafty Kill Point

September 15, 2016
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The “kill point” is the place in a room where the last strip of wallpaper meets up with the first strip. The pattern in this last corner virtually never matches. Usually, as in this photo, it’s place over a door where it will be inconspicuous.

I didn’t want there to be an abrupt stoppage of the design, even if it was only 6″ high, up and above the furtherest corner over the door. So I took trimmers and scissors and cut along elements of the design motif, engineering so they would meet up and, from the floor, look as if they were uninterrupted lines. Unless you look really closely, you would never know that the pattern does not match in this corner.

This wallpaper pattern is called “Downing Gate” and is by Thibaut Designs.

From Country Child’s Room to Cozy Guest Room

September 12, 2016
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With it’s bold brown color, contrasting horizontal band, and stenciled pattern, the original treatment of this room had taken a lot of planning and careful execution. To me, it had a country look, but I am told that the room sported a “cars & trucks” theme, and was used by a little boy. See first photo.

The new homeowners plan to use the room as a guest bedroom, though, and wanted something more grown up and more soothing. This neutral-toned Chinoiserie (Oriental-themed) toile (two-color pen-and-ink type drawing of daily life scenics) perfectly transformed the room.

The walls had a fairly heavy texture, which I skim-floated the first day, then sanded smooth and primed the second day. I love the second photo, with the new paper juxtaposed against the freshly-prepped walls.

The second-to-last photo shows my kill point, where the last strip meets up to the first strip, which virtually always ends in a mis-match. I pulled a few tricks out of my hat, and I think I disguised this mis-matched corner nicely.

This wallpaper is on a non-woven substrate, and is by Brewster. It was more pliable than many non-wovens, and was pretty nice to work with. The seams were practically invisible, and even going around corners and windows, the paper performed well. It was bought below retail price from Sherwin-Williams, at the Durham & Washington store, in Houston.

Fabulous Jolt of Color in a Little Girl’s Bedroom

August 24, 2016
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The homeowner was originally looking at doing one accent wall behind the bed, and was loving a contemporary design with sort of concentric wavy-edged circles in a rhythmic pattern, by a high-end manufacturer that is known for printing defects, and that was crazy expensive and had a 65″ pattern repeat (lots of waste).

Over time, she looked at the room differently, and did an about-face, ending up having block paneling installed on the lower 1/3 of the walls, and then papering all four walls with a classic trellis pattern in a bold and contemporary color.

Unlike the original choice with the wavy circles, this trellis design has been around for hundreds of years and will not go out of style. The strong turquoise color stands out brilliantly against the white paneled wainscoting, so the room looks crisp and fresh for its young inhabitant, a six year old girl. The décor will be pumped up even more with the addition of a few jolts of bright coral – a vase, a throw pillow, and – most daringly – the chandelier.

Although this room presented challenges (unplumb walls coupled with an unforgiving geometric design, plus two windows with crooked edges and dimensions out of sync with those of the wallpaper), it was a fun install. A lot of plotting and brainwork was required to get that geometric pattern to look straight against those unplumb walls.

The 4th photo shows the kill point – the point where the last strip of wallpaper comes back around to meet the first strip. This almost always ends up in a mis-match. This corner did mis-match, but I had a lot of fun fiddling around to make it look like it matched.

Most men don’t care too much about decorating, but this father was really excited about the transformation of his daughter’s room.

This wallpaper pattern is called Downing Gate, and is by Thibaut Designs, and was bought below retail price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. Dorota was also able to get the paper shipped here super fast, so the homeowner could keep her original installation date. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. She is great at helping you find just the perfect paper! Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Trellis Pattern End Point Over A Door

November 8, 2015

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When hanging wallpaper in a room with four corners, that last corner virtually always ends in a mis-match. That’s because the width of the paper is not perfectly proportional to the width of the walls. With a wild pattern, you might not notice. But with a design like this trellis, your eye might be jarred by this mis-match.

So we try to hide this last corner, behind a door, hopefully, if it sits close to a the adjoining wall. But this powder room didn’t have any “hidden” corners, so the mis-match was going to be pretty noticeable. But I found a good place to hide it.

This room sits under the stairs, and has a sloping ceiling. Over the door, the wall was 20″ high, but where the ceiling sloped down near one corner of the door, it came to more like 10.” You’ll notice 10″ worth of mis-match much less than 20,” so I decided to put it right there. Normally, I wouldn’t put the kill point, as it’s called, in an open wall space right over a door, but in this room, and with this pattern, it was the best option.

I plotted which lines from the strip of wallpaper over the door would look best placed against the lines on the strip to the right of the door. I carefully cut along the design, making sure that the white lines met up with each other without any abrupt stops or angles.

Once finished, if you were just casually looking around the room, you would never notice that the pattern doesn’t match perfectly over that corner.

This trellis pattern is by Ronald Redding, for York Wallcoverings, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Kill Point – It May Not Match, But It Sure LOOKS Like It Does!

May 1, 2015

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The kill point is the last corner in a room, where the last strip of wallpaper meet up with the first strip. And here the pattern virtually never matches – it’s just the laws of geometry. I usually hide this in an inconspicuous place, like behind a door. But in this room, there was no out-of-the-way corner, so the pattern mis-match would have to be in a fairly prominent location, 10′ long, in the corner to the left of the toilet.

But, unless you study this carefully, you really don’t realize that this pattern does not match as it should. I wish I could take credit for how perfectly this last corner worked out, but, again, it is just the laws of geometry and physics that brought the half-ovals on the right to meet perfectly with the half-ovals on the left.

What I can take credit for, though, is for having kept the diamonds and other elements at the same level all the way around the room. With un-plumb walls and crooked ceilings, and etc., wallpaper patterns can start moving up or down the wall. Maintaining this horizontal line can be tricky, but it helps immensely to keep the room feeling balanced.

Coordinating the Last Two Corners And the Kill Point

April 16, 2015

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When wallpapering a room, the pattern in the last corner virtually never matches. It’s just physiology and geometry. We call that last corner the “kill point,” and try to put it in an inconspicuous place, like behind a door, or in a short strip over a door. But in this room, the kill point was very obvious – a 5′ high strip next to the toilet. To make matters worse, the walls were crooked, when throws the pattern off-plumb and exacerbates the mis-match.

In the middle of a wall, a mis-match on this geometric pattern would be very obvious. But in a corner, not so much, because it’s fairly busy and the corner disguises the break. However, the strong horizontal line looks much better if it’s maintained from wall to wall.

But what to do if the wall is crooked and causes your wallpaper design to start running uphill? That’s the problem I faced after turning the corner on the right. So what I did was, instead of smoothing that next piece into place and trimming it at the ceiling and floor, I positioned it temporarily, and then placed the second strip, which met the corner on the left, also leaving it loose. Then I was able to play with both strips, to line up the horizontal lines, (which were off by about 1/4″ – 3/8″).

To twist the wallpaper into line, I wrapped the lower section of the right hand strip a littler further onto the wall on the right than it was at the top. This caused a slight pattern mis-match, but it was minor and low to the floor, so not a biggie. Same thing in the left corner.

But wait – there’s more! Look at the photo with the toilet. If you look closely, you will see that one of the diagonal lines in the wallpaper is narrower than the others. What I did was, I cut along the white stripe and then twisted the paper to line up as I wanted it to to match the pattern, overlapping the white stripe over the wallpaper below it. Because no vertical lines are dissected, you don’t notice the slight pattern mis-match.

I tossed in the final photo so you could see how the finished room looks. This was hung in a powder room in the Heights neighborhood of Houston. This wallpaper pattern is by Thibaut Designs, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Last Corner – “Kill Point” – On a Trellis

April 5, 2015

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I apologize for the dark photo, but this is actually pretty cool. The kill point is the last corner in a room, and the wallpaper pattern virtually always ends here in a mis-match. But today, the last corner matched absolutely perfectly. That is VERY rare! It is just a chance of fate that the pattern on the right got cut off at exactly the same point as the pattern on the left, so when they met in the corner, the match was perfect.

But, well, it didn’t exactly happen all that easily.

If you look closely at the wall on the right, you will see that the pattern is a little lower than the pattern on the left. That is because the corners of the room were not plumb, causing the wallpaper to hang crooked, and when that happens, the pattern will travel up or down hill at the ceiling line. I think it’s more important to match the pattern in the corners as precisely as possible, even if it means that the pattern is not straight along the ceiling line. Because this is so common, we try to make the pattern match best at eye level, and hope that people don’t spend too much time looking at the ceiling line.

Anyway, as you move around the room hanging paper, the other walls may be out of plumb, too, causing the subsequent strips of wallpaper to go off-plumb, and then their pattern will also travel up or down hill. That means that, by the time your last strip butts up against your first strip, your horizontal lines may not line up.

And that’s what happened here. But you hardly notice. Why? The wall on the right has a seam about 2″ from the corner – right were the two motifs meet. When I had the pattern perfectly matched across this seam, the silver “ring” at the join point matched perfectly with the one on the previous strip, but the black lines from the trellis on the right did not line up with the black lines on the left.

So what I did was, I carefully removed the narrow 2″ strip of paper and slid it a little higher on the wall, matching it to the black lines on the pattern on the left side of the corner. This threw off the match of the silver rings on the wall on the right. But, hey, it is only slightly off, and it’s 7′ high and over the door, so who’s gonna notice? But if those black lines on the trellis motif mis-matched, people would notice.

This was a small adjustment, but it made a world of difference in how the finished room looks.

I realize that this is the kind of post that only a paperhanger could follow and appreciate. But I was just so excited today, to be able to have a perfectly matched kill point!

Kill Point – Disguising the Mis-Match

May 6, 2014

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Digital ImageAs you go around the room hanging wallpaper, the final corner virtually always is a pattern mis-match, so part of the “engineering” before you start is to find the least obvious place to put this “kill point.” Because of all the angles and turns in this large kitchen, there were a number of them on this job, and with a definite pattern like this trellis, they are usually very noticeable.

Re the first photo, the previous installer, who had hung a similar lattice pattern, put the kill point in an 18″ high corner on the back wall of the built-in desk. Yes, papers and stuff might obscure it, but I wanted to make it less noticeable. So I matched the pattern in that corner, continued hanging paper along the back wall behind the desk moving to the right and then going up, a narrow strip between the hanging cabinets and the door, to meet the paper I had already hung over the cabinets and door. You see all this in the first photo.

This enabled me to put the mis-match way above eye-level, and only about 3″ wide. I trimmed carefully along certain lines of the design, to make the mis-match as little noticeable as possible. Seriously, you’d have to hunt pretty hard to see this. 🙂

In the other photo, the design on the strip on the left “almost” matched up with the previously hung strip on the right, and the horizontal elements are all at the same level, which minimizes the mis-match. But there was enough of a break in the design to jar the eye.

So I cut a few elements of the design from some scraps of paper, and pasted them on top in a way that makes it look like the design continues unbroken. Just sweeping your eye around the room, you would never notice this. 🙂

This pretty trellis design is by York Wallcoverings, the Sure Strip line.