Posts Tagged ‘mis-match’

Over the Door Kill Point with a Stripe

July 11, 2017

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The “kill point” is where you land your last strip of wallpaper. When it meets up against your first strip – which is usually in a corner – it almost always results in a mis-match of the pattern. And pattern mis-matches catch and jar the eye. So that’s why you try to hide the kill point in a corner or behind a door, or somewhere where it won’t be prominently displayed.

But this bathroom didn’t have a “hidden” corner where the mis-match would not be noticed. I was going to end up with two 8′ lengths of the wide white stripes closer to each other than they should have been.

So I decided to match the pattern correctly in the corner, and then move the kill point up and away from eye-level – to over the door.

On the right side of the photo, you see the stripes at their normal width. As you move to the left, though, there is one stripe that is not the same width. This is my kill point.

The thing is, even though that stripe is narrower than the others, it doesn’t scream at you; your eye passes right over it.

Water Color-y Pink Floral for Little Girl’s Room

June 29, 2017

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Here is a sweet pattern that really charmed up a little girl’s room in the Briar Meadows neighborhood of Houston. I hung it on one accent wall behind the bed’s headboard. In the first three photos (before, during, & after), the vertical shadows on the wall are from the dangling crystals on the chandelier. There is also a little splotchiness because the paper is still wet – the spots will disappear when it dries.

This pre-pasted wallpaper is by Jolie, and was bought on-line. It is a mural, meaning that the paper comes in panels, instead of rolls, and the pattern does not repeat itself nearly as frequently as a regular wallpaper pattern does. It is popular with moms who have little girls, and I have hung it several times. (Do a Search here.)

Just like the other times, I was disappointed in the quality of this paper. (Do a Search here.) Actually, the quality of the paper itself is fine. It is the manufacturer’s inattention to detail that is the stumbling block.

Photo #4 shows a mis-match in the pattern. These were relatively few and relatively minor, though, and really weren’t a big deal.

Other issues, however, were more noticeable and less satisfactory. Photos #5 & #6 show where the trimming blades at the factory got off-kilter, and created curved cuts. This is the exact same shape of bad cuts I have had with my other installs of this product. (Do a Search here.)

When the edges of wallpaper are not cut straight, it’s impossible to butt them together perfectly. So with this material, you are left with “gaps and overlaps,” which you can see see in Photo #7…I know the photo is crummy, but if you enlarge it and look closely, you see three distinct and rather wide gaps, all within about a 6″ length of seam.

Besides gaps, badly cut seams will result in overlaps. Photo #8 shows an overlap of about 1/8″. I hate overlaps more than gaps. I’ll take a gap over an overlap any day. But I’d rather not have either, because both look bad, in my opinion – and a conscientious manufacturer will ensure that his product is not cut like this.

Most people would not have even noticed the gaps or overlaps. But they were bugging me, and I thought I could give these homeowners a little better.

So, on some of the worst overlaps, I took a straightedge and a brand new, very sharp razor blade, and trimmed off the excess, which amounted to 1/8″ of an inch in some areas, and down to about 1/32″ in others. When dealing with these minuscule widths, this procedure is tedious and exacting, and it doesn’t always result in perfect results. Before cutting, you have to pad the wall to protect it, and then work carefully so your razor blade cuts only the two layers of paper, but not into the wall. (Scoring the wall can cause delaminating (the wall coming apart and the wallpaper seams curling) down the road.) There are a lot more factors that complicate the trimming process. But the end result, although imperfect, looked much better and was worth the time and effort.

And, from a distance, and with the furniture back in place and the shade down and my 100 watt light bulb out of the room, the wall looks fantastically feminine is perfectly suited to this young daughter.

Ogee Petals Wallpaper Pattern in a Powder Room

February 7, 2017
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“Ogee” means double continuous “S” pattern. This wallpaper pattern sure has them! It is also reminiscent of flower petals, and so has been called “Petals” in some of its incarnations. I hung the glass bead version a few months ago. https://wallpaperlady.wordpress.com/2016/10/30/swoopy-trellis-of-glass-beads-brightens-a-powder-room/ This no-bead paper was not as difficult, but it still was a tedious install.

My before shot disappeared, and so did my prep shot, so please just enjoy the pics of the finished project. Note the careful centering of the pattern on both the sink faucet. This was very time consuming, because I had to start with the strip to the left of the one over the sink, and carefully plot the width of the pattern and the rate of expansion of the wet paper; I won’t go into explaining it here, but I think it was well worth the 45 minutes it took to accomplish. The pattern is also centered nicely over the toilet.

The strip to the right of the mirror also took about 45 minutes, thanks to un-plumb walls, bowed walls, stiff unyielding paper, and more, in order to get the pattern to match at points both above and below the mirror, all the while keeping the right edge plumb, and straight enough for the next trip to be able to butt up against.

In the close-up shot, you see a slight pattern mis-match at the seams. The manufacturer had a mis-print issue, which was more noticeable in some rolls than others. I followed paperhanger protocol, and matched the pattern where it would be seen at eye-level, and I let points above and below fall out of match as they happened. Once the job was finished, I took some brown craft paint and a VERY tiny paint brush, and colored some of the mis-matched areas, to make them less noticeable to the human eye. It looked great.

I also ran a bead of clear caulk around the top of the backsplash, to prevent splashed water from being wicked up under the paper (which could cause curling).

This wallpaper pattern is by A-Street Prints, which is made by Brewster. I hung it in the powder room of a new home in the Meyerland neighborhood of Houston. It is a non-woven material, and it is meant that you paste the wall, rather than pasting the wallpaper.

Crafty Kill Point

September 15, 2016
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The “kill point” is the place in a room where the last strip of wallpaper meets up with the first strip. The pattern in this last corner virtually never matches. Usually, as in this photo, it’s place over a door where it will be inconspicuous.

I didn’t want there to be an abrupt stoppage of the design, even if it was only 6″ high, up and above the furtherest corner over the door. So I took trimmers and scissors and cut along elements of the design motif, engineering so they would meet up and, from the floor, look as if they were uninterrupted lines. Unless you look really closely, you would never know that the pattern does not match in this corner.

This wallpaper pattern is called “Downing Gate” and is by Thibaut Designs.

Fabulous Jolt of Color in a Little Girl’s Bedroom

August 24, 2016
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The homeowner was originally looking at doing one accent wall behind the bed, and was loving a contemporary design with sort of concentric wavy-edged circles in a rhythmic pattern, by a high-end manufacturer that is known for printing defects, and that was crazy expensive and had a 65″ pattern repeat (lots of waste).

Over time, she looked at the room differently, and did an about-face, ending up having block paneling installed on the lower 1/3 of the walls, and then papering all four walls with a classic trellis pattern in a bold and contemporary color.

Unlike the original choice with the wavy circles, this trellis design has been around for hundreds of years and will not go out of style. The strong turquoise color stands out brilliantly against the white paneled wainscoting, so the room looks crisp and fresh for its young inhabitant, a six year old girl. The décor will be pumped up even more with the addition of a few jolts of bright coral – a vase, a throw pillow, and – most daringly – the chandelier.

Although this room presented challenges (unplumb walls coupled with an unforgiving geometric design, plus two windows with crooked edges and dimensions out of sync with those of the wallpaper), it was a fun install. A lot of plotting and brainwork was required to get that geometric pattern to look straight against those unplumb walls.

The 4th photo shows the kill point – the point where the last strip of wallpaper comes back around to meet the first strip. This almost always ends up in a mis-match. This corner did mis-match, but I had a lot of fun fiddling around to make it look like it matched.

Most men don’t care too much about decorating, but this father was really excited about the transformation of his daughter’s room.

This wallpaper pattern is called Downing Gate, and is by Thibaut Designs, and was bought below retail price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. Dorota was also able to get the paper shipped here super fast, so the homeowner could keep her original installation date. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. She is great at helping you find just the perfect paper! Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Trellis Pattern End Point Over A Door

November 8, 2015

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When hanging wallpaper in a room with four corners, that last corner virtually always ends in a mis-match. That’s because the width of the paper is not perfectly proportional to the width of the walls. With a wild pattern, you might not notice. But with a design like this trellis, your eye might be jarred by this mis-match.

So we try to hide this last corner, behind a door, hopefully, if it sits close to a the adjoining wall. But this powder room didn’t have any “hidden” corners, so the mis-match was going to be pretty noticeable. But I found a good place to hide it.

This room sits under the stairs, and has a sloping ceiling. Over the door, the wall was 20″ high, but where the ceiling sloped down near one corner of the door, it came to more like 10.” You’ll notice 10″ worth of mis-match much less than 20,” so I decided to put it right there. Normally, I wouldn’t put the kill point, as it’s called, in an open wall space right over a door, but in this room, and with this pattern, it was the best option.

I plotted which lines from the strip of wallpaper over the door would look best placed against the lines on the strip to the right of the door. I carefully cut along the design, making sure that the white lines met up with each other without any abrupt stops or angles.

Once finished, if you were just casually looking around the room, you would never notice that the pattern doesn’t match perfectly over that corner.

This trellis pattern is by Ronald Redding, for York Wallcoverings, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Re-Matching a Mis-Matched Corner

September 7, 2015
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As you hang wallpaper around a room, once you arrive back at the corner where you started out, virtually always, this last corner will have a pattern mis-match, and so you place it in the least conspicuous place.

In this powder room in Montrose, I put the mis-match in the corner over a door. It was a mere 11″ high, and was only off by a half an inch or so. (Photo I) But I knew I could make it look better.

To get the pattern to match, I would have to slide the strip on the left about a half an inch to the right. But doing that would leave a gap on the left side, with the wall showing through.

Since there was no pattern to match across the seam, I didn’t have to worry about a pattern mis-match there. So I decided to “grow the paper,” by splicing in some narrow strips of background colored paper.

I cut the 13.5″ wide strip of wallpaper in half vertically. That allowed me to disperse the spliced area across more space, making it less eye-jarring. I dug some scraps of left over paper out of the trash and trimmed them to 1/4″ wide. These were used a spacers in between the 6.75″ wide strips of wallpaper. Two of them, plus a teeny bit of overlap, were just enough to space out the wallpaper pattern, so that the pattern matched perfectly in the corner on the left, and still maintained the proper pattern in the strips over the door.

From below, you sure cannot tell that some of the white areas are wider than others. And you can’t notice the slight ridge from the overlapped areas, either.

Coordinating the Last Two Corners And the Kill Point

April 16, 2015

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When wallpapering a room, the pattern in the last corner virtually never matches. It’s just physiology and geometry. We call that last corner the “kill point,” and try to put it in an inconspicuous place, like behind a door, or in a short strip over a door. But in this room, the kill point was very obvious – a 5′ high strip next to the toilet. To make matters worse, the walls were crooked, when throws the pattern off-plumb and exacerbates the mis-match.

In the middle of a wall, a mis-match on this geometric pattern would be very obvious. But in a corner, not so much, because it’s fairly busy and the corner disguises the break. However, the strong horizontal line looks much better if it’s maintained from wall to wall.

But what to do if the wall is crooked and causes your wallpaper design to start running uphill? That’s the problem I faced after turning the corner on the right. So what I did was, instead of smoothing that next piece into place and trimming it at the ceiling and floor, I positioned it temporarily, and then placed the second strip, which met the corner on the left, also leaving it loose. Then I was able to play with both strips, to line up the horizontal lines, (which were off by about 1/4″ – 3/8″).

To twist the wallpaper into line, I wrapped the lower section of the right hand strip a littler further onto the wall on the right than it was at the top. This caused a slight pattern mis-match, but it was minor and low to the floor, so not a biggie. Same thing in the left corner.

But wait – there’s more! Look at the photo with the toilet. If you look closely, you will see that one of the diagonal lines in the wallpaper is narrower than the others. What I did was, I cut along the white stripe and then twisted the paper to line up as I wanted it to to match the pattern, overlapping the white stripe over the wallpaper below it. Because no vertical lines are dissected, you don’t notice the slight pattern mis-match.

I tossed in the final photo so you could see how the finished room looks. This was hung in a powder room in the Heights neighborhood of Houston. This wallpaper pattern is by Thibaut Designs, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Last Corner – “Kill Point” – On a Trellis

April 5, 2015

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I apologize for the dark photo, but this is actually pretty cool. The kill point is the last corner in a room, and the wallpaper pattern virtually always ends here in a mis-match. But today, the last corner matched absolutely perfectly. That is VERY rare! It is just a chance of fate that the pattern on the right got cut off at exactly the same point as the pattern on the left, so when they met in the corner, the match was perfect.

But, well, it didn’t exactly happen all that easily.

If you look closely at the wall on the right, you will see that the pattern is a little lower than the pattern on the left. That is because the corners of the room were not plumb, causing the wallpaper to hang crooked, and when that happens, the pattern will travel up or down hill at the ceiling line. I think it’s more important to match the pattern in the corners as precisely as possible, even if it means that the pattern is not straight along the ceiling line. Because this is so common, we try to make the pattern match best at eye level, and hope that people don’t spend too much time looking at the ceiling line.

Anyway, as you move around the room hanging paper, the other walls may be out of plumb, too, causing the subsequent strips of wallpaper to go off-plumb, and then their pattern will also travel up or down hill. That means that, by the time your last strip butts up against your first strip, your horizontal lines may not line up.

And that’s what happened here. But you hardly notice. Why? The wall on the right has a seam about 2″ from the corner – right were the two motifs meet. When I had the pattern perfectly matched across this seam, the silver “ring” at the join point matched perfectly with the one on the previous strip, but the black lines from the trellis on the right did not line up with the black lines on the left.

So what I did was, I carefully removed the narrow 2″ strip of paper and slid it a little higher on the wall, matching it to the black lines on the pattern on the left side of the corner. This threw off the match of the silver rings on the wall on the right. But, hey, it is only slightly off, and it’s 7′ high and over the door, so who’s gonna notice? But if those black lines on the trellis motif mis-matched, people would notice.

This was a small adjustment, but it made a world of difference in how the finished room looks.

I realize that this is the kind of post that only a paperhanger could follow and appreciate. But I was just so excited today, to be able to have a perfectly matched kill point!

“Growing Paper” – Can You Spot the Mis-Match?

August 22, 2014

Digital ImageHere is a very pretty (and historic) wallpaper pattern that I am hanging in a master bedroom in the Museum District. This wall has two large side-by-side windows, which can get tricky, especially in a 90-year-old house with un-straight and un-plumb walls and ceilings.

I hung the strips to the left of the windows, then the three short strips over the tops of the windows, then three more short strips below the windows. The next strip was a full-length pieces to the right of the windows.

The trick is to get the top of the strip to line up with the bottom of the strip. In this case, for various reasons, mostly having to do with crooked walls, there was a 3/4″ gap between the new strip to the right of the windows and the strip beneath the windows.

Using paper that matched the pattern, I could splice in a 3/4″ piece. But that would mean that elements of the design would be duplicated, and the eye would catch that. But if I used a part of the design that did not duplicate the pattern, the resulting mis-match would be even more obvious.

I gauged that the right side of the design had fewer elements that HAD to remain intact, an the left side had a leaf that would look bad if it got repeated. So what I did was to take a 3/4″ wide strip that matched the left side of the full-length strip, and splice it in.

But to minimize the mis-match, I cut along some of the design and let it overlap the strip to the left. So now I had a double-image, but parts of it were cut out of the spliced piece, so you only see a little repeating.

Then I took some scraps of wallpaper and cut out “appliqués” of leaves and a butterfly, to paste over the repeated elements, to break them up. I even used pencil to draw in a few leaves and stems, again to break up the double image.

In the photo, to the left of the outlet cover, and to the left of the butterfly, can you see the two twigs that point off to the upper left corner? These are the duplicated images. But they’re not offensively noticeable, because a stem has been cut out, a leaf has been added, and a butterfly is added to break up the straight lines.

This wallpaper pattern, a recreation of a historic 1800’s design, is by Cole & Son, a British company, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.