Posts Tagged ‘narrow’

A Narrow Strip and a Teeny Strip

May 28, 2022
I wanted to center this wallpaper pattern so the palm tree / banana leaves would fall nicely over the sink and in between the light sconces. That took a lot of measuring, plotting, planning, and time, But it gives the wall – and the whole room – a nicely balanced feel.
Unfortunately, due to the dimensions of the room and the width of the wallpaper, it also led to some difficult, time consuming, and downright PITA logistics. Oh, and ate up a lot of wallpaper, too.
For starters, note the narrow gap on the left that needs to be filled with wallpaper. That 1″ wide strip along the linen cabinet requires a full 7′ length of wallpaper. That’s about 12 sq ft of wallpaper needed to cover the 1/4 sq ft of gap.
Moral: Always buy a little extra paper!
Note: I did other sections of the room before going back to fill in this gap, so was able to use a scrap from another area, rather than cut up a new 7′ long piece.
Here it is with that 1″ wide strip pieced in.

Arrrgh! Here’s another one. A gap between a strip of wallpaper and the door molding, that tapers (thanks to un-plumb walls) from 1/4″ down to nothing.
Thankfully, here again, I avoided cutting up a 7′ long strip of wallpaper by using scraps.
No pic of the finished placement.

Fitting a Wide Strip into a Narrow Wall Space in a Corner

February 18, 2022
I have to cover 15″ width of wall with a strip of wallpaper that is 27″ wide. Working with that 27″ wide strip and pushing it into the corner, and getting paste all over the woodwork, and trying to not get creases in the paper … all very difficult.
My solution is to trim the wallpaper to fit the corner. Here the strip has already been cut, pasted, and booked (folded pasted-side-to-pasted-side). I’ve determined that I want the new strip to be 15″ wide. This will allow enough to cover the wall space, plus the 1/2″ inside the little space between the wall and the door trim.
Because wallpaper expands when it gets wet with paste, to get an accurate measurement, I’m trimming after the strip has been cut, pasted, and booked for a few minutes, and has expanded to its maximum.
This is called wet trimming. Alternately, dry trimming is when you measure and trim an unpasted and unfolded strip.
My straightedge is set at 15″ from the left edge of the wallpaper. I’ve used a single edge razor blade to make the cut.
Here is the strip in position on the wall. I’m using a plastic trapezoid squeegee wallpaper smoother to push the right edge into the small space between the wall and the door molding.
You can see how nicely the wallpaper wraps around the corner and tucks into that narrow space.
The pattern is called Garden Party and is by Rifle Paper, which is made by York, one of my favorite companies.

Dad-Blast! Tiny 1/4″ Wide Strip

April 27, 2021

Hard to see in the photo, but there is a tiny, 1/4″ wide gap between the edge of the wallpaper and the window frame. It tapers down to about 1/8″ toward the bottom.

Little things like this eat up a lot of time. I could cut, paste, and hang a whole full-length strip of wallpaper in the time it took me to fill in this teeny narrow area.

And they eat up a lot of paper. Ideally, I would have something on my scrap pile that would work here. But most likely, I would need to use a whole new 8′ strip of paper, to get the 1/4″ wide piece needed.

Narrow-ing a Strip Over a Door

April 25, 2021
Strip is gonna extend 1″ to the left of the door molding. Meaning, I’ll have to add a strip of wallpaper to the left of the door, plus a pesky 1″ strip next to it.
Slicing the short strip vertically along the foliage design.
Moved the strip 1/2″ to the right, overlapping at the cut area. It’s impossible to tell that the spacing is a tad narrower. I did the same thing to the next strip (on the left). 1/2″ + 1/2″ = 1″ … so I have effectively “shrunk” the paper by 1″ in width.

I

Butting up my next strip along the door frame. No need to add a puny 1″ strip.
Untrimmed piece (with the blue tape at the top) overlaps by 1/2″ onto the strip to the right of it.

Hanging wallpaper strips over the door, moving to the left … the strip was going to hang over the space by 1.” This would mean that I would have to hang a wide strip of wallpaper, and then fit in a narrow 1″ strip between it and the door frame.

By “narrowing” two short strips over the door, I was able eliminate that skimpy 1″ strip, eliminate a seam, and bring the wider strip to where it butted up right against the door frame.