Posts Tagged ‘nature’

Wallpaper in American Farmhouse Style Magazine

May 18, 2021
Nature / woodland pattern that invites you to venture down a cool forest path. The dark color is a welcome respite from the all-white theme in most farm house d├ęcor. Putting it just above the wainscoting / chair rail keeps the color and pattern from being overwhelming.
A sweet background for kitchen shelves. This is actually wrapping paper – if you DIY, perhaps it’s an economical alternative to real wallpaper.
Adorable and appropriate for a kitchen wall.
Brick patterned wallpaper as a textured alternative to the expected ship-lap wood in many farmhouse settings.

This is from the June / July 2021 issue of American Farmhouse Style magazine.

It’s so great to see how wallpaper can add a boost to this popular style of decorating.

Another Pretty, Garden-y Wallpaper In A Bathroom

February 12, 2021

A second pretty, nature-themed bathroom this week! This room was a long time coming, because, back in November when I first started this job, the original selection had printing defects, so, long story short, the homeowner had to choose a whole new pattern.

To be honest, both she and I think we like this new option even better! There are more birds, the motifs are more realistic, and the white background just brightens the entire space. In addition, the raised ink printing process creates a textured look with subtle beauty.

This wallpaper is by Thibaut, one of my favorite brands. This particular paper comes pre-pasted, and is a perfect joy to work with. It is thin and adheres tightly to the wall, and will last for many, many years.

This was purchased from Sarah at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby.

Arts & Crafts Authenticity in a 1908 Heights Home

July 16, 2020


This home in the Woodland Heights neighborhood of Houston dates back to the very early 20th Century, back when the Arts & Crafts movement was in full force. The style emphasized nature, earthy colors, blocky features, and stylized designs.

I like this look a lot, so it was really fun to work with the wallpaper and help bring their living room to their vision. They have the period furniture to go with it.

The wallpaper is by Bradbury & Bradbury, a California company that makes wallpaper in vintage and antique designs – Victorian, William Morris, Art Nouveau, Arts & Crafts, Oriental, Atomic Age, ’20’s, and more.

Their paper is a little tricky to work with. First, there is an unprinted selvedge edge that has to be trimmed off with a 6′ straightedge and razor blade (search here for other posts showing that process).

The manufacturer calls for clay-based paste, which I hate, for various reasons. But to comply with their specs, I bought a $50, 50lb, 5-gallon bucket of it – and used only about 1/2 gallon. Clay is a low-moisture paste, which helps with this material.

When wet with paste, the heavy inks on this paper absorb moisture differently from the paper backing, and the result is “waffling” or “quilting” – which is when you get wrinkles inside the unprinted areas (do a search here for more posts on this issue). To prevent this, it helps to lightly dampen the surface of the paper with a sponge and clean water. This helps even out the moisture ratio. I found that this pattern also fared better with a little water sponged lightly onto the back, as well.

To handle the 20′ long horizontal strips, after pasting, I folded the strips accordion-style. I also added blue plastic tape to the bottom edge, to prevent paste from getting onto the painted woodwork, which would eliminate the need to wipe it off during installation. Then all went into a plastic trash bag to “book” for a few minutes.

I set up two ladders, so I could step between them as I unfolded the accordion pleats, and I also used push pins to hold the booked strip up while I got down and moved the ladders.

The paper adhered nicely to the wall without curling at the edges. There were a few wrinkles in the inked areas, but these disappeared as the paper dried.

A wide decorative border like this, especially dating to this era, is called a “frieze.”

What’s really cool is that the homeowner (a former contractor), added the block wood molding because he wanted to unite the heights of the door molding with that of the windows (both just barely visible in the photos). That was way before they thought of adding a wallpaper border. Once they discovered Bradbury and started hunting for a wallpaper, turns out that the height of the space between the two moldings was exactly the height of the wallpaper frieze.

Even more amazing is that the paint colors were chosen before they went searching for wallpaper – but are magically perfectly harmonious with the colors in the frieze.

This wallpaper pattern is called “Birchwood Frieze,” by Bradbury & Bradbury. They have lots more gorgeous stuff on their website.

More Pics of the Shaded Faux Grasscloth

September 28, 2018


Addendum to my post yesterday … here are clearer pictures of the shading / paneling with this faux grasscloth product.

In the top photo, you can see the color difference between the right side of one strip and the left side of the other.

The second photo is shot from an angle, and it unjustly exaggerates the issue. Seen straight-on, these two strips are pleasing and look pretty much the same color. But from an angle, there is a very distinct difference between the two strips. At first, I thought it was due to some variance with the strings, which are superimposed onto the surface of the wallpaper. But the strings have nothing to do with it. The effect is weird because the strips were both taken sequentially from the same bolt, and are hung running in the same direction.

The look is similar to what you would expect from real grasscloth – the beauty inherent to natural fibers and materials taken from nature.

It’s weird, and it’s unexplainable. And it’s disappointing because I recommend this product over real grasscloth, because of its uniformity (read yesterday’s post). Yet these photos prove that this product is not uniform. For the record, I have had this shading problem with this darker brown color, but not with the lighter tan color. Warts and all, it’s still a more pleasing product than real grasscloth. IMO.

My best advice: Look at your wallpaper straight-on, not from an angle.