Posts Tagged ‘norhill’

Animal Blocks in a Baby’s Room

December 25, 2018


A new baby will soon be welcomed into the home of this young couple in the Houston Heights neighborhood called Norhill (or Woodland Heights). Mom wanted something gender-neutral, and found this colorful and adorable shapes-and-animals-in-blocks print on line at Lulie Wallace.

This went on just one accent wall of the room, but it is tame enough that it would work OK if put on all four walls.

I skim-floated the walls first, to smooth out the light texture on them, then followed with a primer coat of Gardz.

This wallpaper is a bit atypical, because it is pre-pasted, which means it comes with a thin layer of paste on the back that you activate with water (instead of having to roll paste on the back of every strip). I do like the pre-pasted papers. I do roll a light coat of paste on the wall, to augment the manufacturer’s pre-paste.

Another dissimilarity is that the paper comes packaged in individual strips, rather than traditional rolls with several strips rolled up together.

Even more unusual is that the strips were meant to be overlapped, instead of butted together. Overlapping the seams creates a vertical ridge under the paper which is somewhat visible. You also have to have an adhesive that will stick to the acrylic coating on top of the paper.

There are some good aspects to overlapping seams. For one, this makes for a very strong bond. For another, it takes stress of drying and shrinking paper off the seam and distributes it across that 3/4″ of overlapped area. In this 80-year-old house, with it’s many layers of paint with a history of not sticking to each other, this is important, because it greatly reduces the chances of the tension on the seams causing the paint layers to come apart, which would cause gapping at the seams. See previous post.

Another positive feature about overlapping the seams, and how that worked with this particular pattern, is that, in this 1930 home, with its unlevel ceiling and floor and its greatly-out-of-plumb walls, I was able to manipulate the strips of wallpaper so that they looked straight and plumb – even though they were actually hung quite off-plumb.

This wallpaper pattern is by Lulie Wallace, and was bought on line.

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Birds! Pen-and-Ink and Watercolor

November 18, 2016
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Here is wallpaper pattern that is subtle, whimsical, and colorful all at the same time. It looks like a pen-and-ink drawing of trees, with birds filled in in watercolor. Positively beautiful!

I hung this on an accent wall in the dining room of a very nicely updated 1930 brick bungalow in the Norhill district of the Heights neighborhood of Houston. The paper was a non-woven material, and was a paste-the-wall installation process, and was nice to work with. The manufacturer is Holden.

Norhill Home Tour Today – Cool Use of Vintage Wallpaper

October 15, 2012

I love home tours and go on as many as I can. (Eastwood is coming up next weekend – LOVE that neighborhood!)

Today was the Norhill tour, a pocket of the Heights just north of (and similar to) the Woodland Heights. I was surprised that NONE of the homes had wallpaper. Most of the homes were styled fairly true to their 1920’s roots (with updates for modern living, of course), and back then, EVERY room in EVERY house was papered. But all these homeowners opted to paint their spaces, instead.

However, there was one really clever use of old wallpaper that was uncovered during renovation of one of the homes. These vintage patterns are so pretty, and the colors hold up so well, they are just gorgeous. (I have a collection of all I can get my hands on.) Often, homeowners will frame thes scraps of paper and hang them in a room or hallway in the house.

But one homeowner took this idea a step further – She cut the old wallpaper scraps into the shape of butterflies, making sure to get as much of the pattern and color as possible. Then she took some of the old cheesecloth that was originally used to line the old ship-lapped wood walls to provide a base for the wallpaper, in the days before Sheetrock. She affixed the butterflies in an airy arrangement on the cheesecloth, and placed all of it between two sheets of glass, and finished with a simple wooden frame.

Just fabulous! I loved this idea, and so pretty hanging on the wall.