Posts Tagged ‘pamela hope designs’

Glass Bead Wallpaper in a Powder Room

May 21, 2017

Digital Image

Digital Image


So, O.K., it’s a hard room to photograph. All I can show you is the papered wall behind the beautiful light fixture and the really cool mirror.

This wallpaper is embedded with tiny glass beads, which give it dimension, texture and sparkle. In the 2nd photo, you can see how the beads shimmer when the light hits them.

This wallpaper is by Antonia Vella, for York Wallcoverings. It is a non-woven material and is a paste-the-wall product. It is very thick and stiff, and difficult to manipulate, and very hard to cut through, especially the beads. Used lots of razor blades today.

I hung it in a powder room in the Rice Military neighborhood of Houston. The interior designer is Pamela O’Brien of Pamela Hope designs.

Wallpapering an Art Niche

May 18, 2017

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

I went to this home to measure a powder room. But as I walked out of the powder room, I saw this art niche. Art niches are just made for wallpaper. So I suggested the idea to the homeowner – and she loved it.

She chose the same paper for the art niche as was used in the powder room, which helps give the home a cohesive look.

This is a textured, glass bead wallpaper in a muted color scheme. It serves as a backdrop, not a focal point, so the statue really stands out. Note that there is a tall base for the statue, that will raise it up so it fills the art niche more effectively.

The wallpaper is by Antonia Vella for York Wallcoverings. The home is a townhome in the Rice Military area of Houston. The interior designer for the job is Pamela O’Brien of Pamela Hope designs.

Tone-On-Tone and Movement Open Up A Guest Bathroom

May 12, 2017

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image


Digital Image


This guest bathroom is large, but with nothing but grey paint on the walls, it felt claustrophobic and bland. This pen-and-ink look foliage pattern with watercolor birds has just enough movement to bring life to the room, but the scale and the monochromatic color scheme keep it from overpowering.

This wallpaper is by Prestigious Textiles, a British company, and is a non-woven material and is meant to be hung by pasting the wall (not the paper). It is amazingly similar to another paper I hung a few months ago. (last photo) https://wallpaperlady.wordpress.com/2016/11/18/birds-pen-and-ink-and-watercolor/ I guess when someone has a good concept, there is always someone quick to knock it off.

The interior designer for this room is Pamela O’Brien of Pamela Hope Designs. http://www.pamelahopedesigns.com/ PHD does a lot of work on new builds, helping to get everything organized and coordinated from the ground up. This home is brand new, and is in the Crestwood neighborhood, across from Memorial Park in Houston.

Lavender Grasscloth Wallpaper on Bookshelves

March 8, 2017

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image


A simple but dramatic change … This softly-colored grasscloth has a fine texture, but it’s just enough to set off the books and decorative items that will be displayed on the bookshelves.

The shelves could not be removed, so I had to work in tight spaces, with each strip being less than 12″ high. The bottom shelf was at floor level!

In order to eliminate a visible seam down the center, I “railroaded” the grasscloth – ran it horizontally. I used a sewing / crafting self-healing cutting mat to pre-trim the right side of each strip, making sure it was perpendicular to the edge that would be the top of the strip.

This made for less trimming at the wall, less paste smeared on the woodwork, and reduced the chance of paste getting on the surface of the paper, which could stain it.

The manufacturer of the grasscloth is Schumacher, and the pattern number is #5004724.

The interior designer for this job is Pamela O’Brien of Pamela Hope Designs in Houston.

Great Houston Chronicle Story About Wallpaper

January 20, 2017

Click the link to read about modern trends in wallpaper. Click the link, and you can scroll through photos of wallpaper in room settings. I hung the diamond, stone, brick, and circle wallpapers. Pamela O’Brien of Pamela Hope Designs, is the interior designer quoted in the article, and I am privileged to work with her several times a year on wallpaper installations.

I’m a little disappointed that wallpaper is described as a “luxury item,” because, while this article mentions some really “far out there” materials (LED lights), in real life, room-transforming patterns and textures are available at reasonable costs for “average” people in “everyday” homes.

If you’re getting the itch for how wallpaper can personalize and transform your home, send me an e-mail to wallpaperlady@att.net

Big Pattern and Wide Movement Work Nicely in a Large Powder Room

December 2, 2016
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image


This powder room in the West University area of Houston had its large size and a very attractive marble-topped sink console going for it, but not much else, because the boring tan walls were simply – blah. The homeowner loved this classic one-color chintz floral pattern, and, even though she worried that it might “make the room looks smaller,” she took the leap to have it hung in the powder room.

When she saw the finished room, one of the first things she said was, “It makes the room look bigger!” And she is right. Any kind of pattern, but particularly something with movement (swirls) in it like this one, will make the walls appear to recede, and so the room looks larger.

This wallpaper is by Anderson Prints, and is in the EcoChic line. The interior designer is Pamela O’Brien, of Pamela Hope Designs, a Houston based company that has won acclaim for its design style, which is crisp, clean, uncluttered, warm, and livable for modern families. Pamela and her assistant Danna are a joy to work with, too.

Faux Brick Wallpaper Revisited

October 23, 2016

Digital Image

Digital Image


I hung this faux brick wallpaper about a year ago, and was back to do another job, so was able to grab a shot of the finished room.

This is a boy’s bedroom and the home is in the Cypress suburb of Houston, and the interior designer is Pamela Hope Designs.

Difficult Grasscloth Install Today

October 23, 2016
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image


Boy, oh boy, today’s installation was a bear! To begin with, I had a 12′ high accent wall that required using my 8′ ladder, which is unwieldy and can push you away from where you want to work. The wall had a thick texture (typical in new homes in the Houston suburbs – this was near Cypress), that took hours to smooth, dry, sand, and prime.

When it was time to hang the paper, I pasted and booked (folded pasted side to pasted side) and prepared to trim a bit off each edge, which is pretty standard procedure for grass, plus I had planned to trim all the strips to 34.5″, which would make all the strips the same width, which is nice with grass since all the seams are quite visible. I got one seam that looked great. But there was some warping in the material, but I was able to smooth it out.

But when I tried to trim the next strip, the folded edges did not line up, no matter how many times I rebooked it. If the edges don’t line up perfectly, you will not get a straight cut. I dicked around with it for a while, but eventually had to get the strip on the wall, or it would become unusable – and we did not have even one extra strip.

I decided to use the factory edge and leave the strip it’s full width, which was going to screw up my balanced widths of 34.5″. I soon learned that unequal widths of strips was one of the least of my woes that day…

The paper backing had absorbed moisture from the paste, and the whole strip had warped out of shape. No way would the edge butt up perfectly against the previous strip. In the end, I got most of the strip butted and smoothed, but the bottom 1′ or so insisted on overlapping onto the previous strip, so I took a straightedge and very sharp razor blade and cut away the overlap.

This turned out to set the mood for the rest of the job. All the subsequent strips warped significantly, not matter how long or short I booked them. No way would the seams butt up. So I ended up overlapping all the seams and double cutting – the industry term for splicing.

This is not as simple as it sounds, though. For one thing, the newly smoothed wall was soft, and you don’t want to cut into it, or when the paper dries and shrinks a little, the torque it creates can actually pull the wall surface apart, resulting in a curled seam that cannot be pasted back.

So I ran out to my truck and got some special polystyrene strips that are 2″ wide and are placed behind the seam, to protect the wall from the cut. I also grabbed a really nice straightedge that is made just for this purpose, with a handle and a non-slip surface. And some blue plastic tape, because I had to protect the bottom layer of grasscloth from the paste on the strip that was to be overlapped on top of it during the double cut. This is important, because any paste that gets on the surface will stain grasscloth – you have to work absolutely clean.

All three of these special items, by the way, were invented by fellow paperhangers, and fellow members of the Wallpaper Installers Association.

Positioning all these materials took a lot of time. Making the cut itself was intricate, because I could get a good position on it for only a foot or so, then would have to climb down and move the ladder over a little, so I could get right in front of the next couple of feet as I worked my way down the 12′ high strip. Also, two layers of grasscloth are quite thick, and it takes a lot of pressure to do so – while trying not to push myself away from the wall and onto the floor. And you only get one chance to cut, because multiple swipes result in a jagged and ugly seam.

Once the cut was finished, I had to go back and remove the two excess pieces, and the polystyrene strip, and the blue plastic tape, all the while making sure that no paste got onto the surface of the paper. Finally I could take my tool and smooth the two edges together. Double cutting does make a beautiful and perfectly butted seam. But, boy, it sure does take a lot of time, effort, and you need the right equipment.

Including prep and installation, this one accent wall with just six single rolls of grasscloth took me a full 12 hours.

So the seams were nicely butted. But, as you see in the photo, the grasscloth displayed the typical color variations that I find so displeasing. We call it shading and paneling. In the top photo, you can clearly see a difference in color between the two strips, even though they are from the same batch. The second photo shows a little more of this. The third photo is dark, but if you look closely, you can see three strips (two seams), and the slightly darker area along one edge, which is quite noticeable because it butts up against the next strip which is lighter in color.

All reasons why I dislike real grasscloth. The faux products are much more uniform, and seams can be invisible.

In addition, this is a pretty finely textured grass, and on a large, tall wall like this in a large room, I really don’t think the texture shows up very much, unless you are standing right at the wall.

The grasscloth product is by Brewster, and the interior designer on this job is Pamela O’Brien of Pamela Hope Designs.

Faux Stone Wallpaper

February 16, 2016
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image


This is a textured vinyl wallpaper with the look and feel of real stone. It is from the Modern Rustic line by York Wallcoverings.

In the second photo, I am using my laser level to ensure that the wallpaper is hung true to plumb.

I hung it on one accent wall in the bedroom of a pre-teen boy, in Cypress (NW Houston). The interior designer for this job is Pamela O’Brien, of Pamela Hope Designs.

Wallet-Friendly Rivets

February 2, 2016
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image


These homeowners loved the look of the “Rivets” by Phillip Jeffries. (Google it) But that product is way pricy. The interior designer found this similar pattern in a good quality paper, at a much more pocket-friendly price.

I hung this on an accent wall in the bedroom of a pre-teen boy, in a new home in Cypress (NW Houston). The furniture in the room is what you’d call “industrial contemporary” – all brushed / distressed metal, clean lines, with an urban edge. The wallpaper is the perfect backdrop!

The interior designer is Pamela O’Brien of Pamela Hope Designs, and the wallpaper manufacturer is Thibaut, one of my favorite brands.