Posts Tagged ‘pearland’

Water Color-y Mural In a Baby Girl’s Nursery – Accent Wall

February 17, 2017
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Here’s a delightful, softly colorful wall treatment for a soon-to-be-born baby girl. I love the way the flowers look fluid, as if they were brush strokes of water color. It is a mural, made up of six panels, rather than a typical wallpaper with a repeating design motif.

I hung this on one accent wall for behind the crib in a nursery of a newish home in Pearland. The wallpaper was bought on-line, and it came with no label, no instructions, no nothing. The homeowner told me name of the website, but – dang it! – I forgot the site and the brand name. 😦 I suspect that this may be a knock-off of a very similar pattern. Read on.

I have hung this pattern before, with pleasing results:

https://wallpaperlady.wordpress.com/2016/03/20/water-color-ful-wall-for-a-baby-girl/

and with slightly lesser-than-happy results:

https://wallpaperlady.wordpress.com/2016/08/25/water-color-flowers-for-a-little-girls-room/

Anyway, back to hanging the mural. First I smoothed the new suburban home typically heavyish textured wall, and primed with Gardz. (No photos, but similar to the previous two posts.)

In the 4th photo, I have laid out each strip, to be sure of which way is up, of the sequence to be placed on the wall, and to get exact measurements so I can compare them to the wall.

As for getting the paper onto the wall, I followed the protocol for pre-pasted papers, which is to run each strip through a water tray. I added a light coat of supplemental paste to the wall and at the edges (ceiling, baseboard, corners).

Similar to my last experience with this paper, I had what we call “overlaps and gaps” at the seams. See photos 5 and 6. In the 7th picture, you can clearly see that the paper has not been cut straight. Look closely just below the pink flower petal, and you will see that the seam butts perfectly, then jogs to the left in an overlap, then comes back to the right in a perfect butt.

When the manufacturer provides crooked seams, it’s impossible to make them butt together perfectly.

In addition, every seam had pattern mis-matches. In fact, none of the pattern matched perfectly across the 9′ height of the mural. The photo with the dark green leaf shows an example of this. You might think, “Just pull one strip up a little.” But then other elements of the design at other points along the seam would not match up. (Not pictured.)

The paper is simply poorly trimmed and poorly printed.

From a distance, you don’t notice any of this at all, and even close up, most homeowners don’t see it. But this mother-to-be was envisioning a perfect room for her first baby, and she paid a lot of money for the mural and installation – and she spotted the irregularities immediately.

With some of the overlapped seams, I was able to carefully trim off the lower layer, so they butted together better. And as the paper dried, I was able to push some of the seams together, as well as pull apart some of the overlaps. And I used my trusty No. 2 graphite pencil to fill in some of the mis-matched design at the seams.

In the end, the homeowner was happy with the room.

The crib and other baby’s furniture are white, and will look sweet and peaceful against this accent wall.

Why do I have no photos of the finished room? All this furniture is in the garage, still in boxes, waiting to be assembled.

Hmmm… Guess how this young couple is going to spend the weekend? 🙂

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Corduroy Looking Wallpaper Has a Masculine Look

December 24, 2016
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This brown & black, textured vinyl wallpaper went in the guest bath of a single guy in a newish home in Pearland (Houston). It was way too dark (and my camera way too cheapie) to get good photos of it, but in the picture by the light switch you can get an idea of the vertical texture – almost like corduroy. With a light colored shower and light tile floor and a dark brown vanity base with a light top, the overall look was stunning.

The paper was thick and the edges were irregular due to the random texture, plus some of the edges of the rolls had been banged up during shipping, all of which meant that some white backing wanted to show at the seams. So I used artist’s chalk pastels to color the edges before pasting the strips of paper, and this helped a lot to hide the seams.

This product is by York.

Bamboo-Look Grasscloth Warms a Master Bedroom

June 11, 2015
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It does not take a dramatic change to make a dramatic change … In the first photo, the bedroom was painted a darkish tan, and it looked good. But, as you can see, once the one accent wall of grasscloth went up, the room had personality and warmth and character.

This grasscloth pattern is different from most, because it incorporates wide reeds, which look much like bamboo. Real bamboo is hard to cut, and hard to get to fit into corners and to cut around detailed areas like decorative moldings. So this thinner look-alike version was a good option.

In the top photo, the white area is where I have applied smoothing compound, to smooth the textured wall.  I also included photos of the seams, so viewers understand that grasscloth is a natural product, and is not expected to match across the seams.  This particular product, in fact, was very homogeneous in color (many are not), and I was very happy with the way it turned out.

I hung this on an accent / feature wall in a master bedroom in Pearland, outside Houston, Texas.

Soft-Toned Damask on a Tall Bedroom Accent Wall

March 22, 2015

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I don’t get many opportunities to pull out my 16′ extension ladder, but this week I did … the ceilings in this master bedroom were 12′ high! – just a few inches further than I could reach using my 6′ ladder. The first two photos were taken yesterday, as I was “floating” or “skim coating” the wall, to smooth it so the texture would not show through the wallpaper. The whiter areas you see have the plaster-like substance applied, as I work my way from top to bottom, from left to right.

Because of the dark paint on the other walls, I stopped the white “mud” just a hair away from the corner. In the second photo, that is my floating trowel hanging from the brace of the ladder. I floated the wall yesterday, and let it dry overnight. Today I sanded, vacuumed, wiped dust off the wall with a damp sponge, primed, and then finally hung the wallpaper.

I started in the middle (third photo), so I could center the damask motif on the wall, which will look nice once the homeowners get their bed and headboard back in place. The plastic is on my ladder to keep wallpaper paste from slopping all over it. I don’t have to do this with a normal step ladder, but extension ladders require a different angle of approach, and I couldn’t avoid having the pasted paper unbook and flop against my ladder. Yuck.

Fourth photo just shows some of the mechanics of how all this happens. The next pics are shots of the pattern; really pretty, soft, and nicely suited for a bedroom. They wanted a light color on the wallpaper, as it would contrast nicely with their brand new, very dark hardwood floors.

This wallpaper pattern is by Etten (by Seabrook), and is printed on the newish non-woven substrate, which is designed to peel off the wall easily and in one piece, when it’s time to redecorate. Note that, since these papers are generally thick and somewhat puffy, you often see the seams just a little (last two photos).

The room was a master bedroom in a fairly new home, and the location was Pearland, a suburb of Houston, Texas.

Wrapping Window Returns with Stiff Grasscloth

February 5, 2015

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Here is a continuation of yesterday’s job. This wall has five windows, each with two edges (returns) that need to have the wallpaper wrapped inside them. The wallpaper is grasscloth, which is thick and stiff, and not inclined to turn corners without a fight. I used my new “Uni-tool” (invented by a fellow WIA / NGPP member) to persuade the material to wrap around the edge.

The metal tool was used to kind of break the fibers at the edge, so they would make the turn, and then also to smooth out air bubbles, and then press the paper against the wall.

Also, you’re usually supposed to use separate strips of wallpaper in corners, including the 180* corners in between each window, so the paper can fuse itself to the minute changes in angles and plumb-ness of each surface. With thin wallpaper, this works great. But with thick grasscloth, you would be left with a visible difference in thickness the full length of each corner.

So I opted to use full strips instead. This lends its own set of concerns, mainly that if the angle is not 100% perfectly plumb and straight, the wallpaper will want to pull away from the wall, leaving an air bubble behind. To help prevent this, I used extra paste on the points of tension on the wall, in addition to the paste on the paper, and also worked hard with my smoother (but not so hard as to damage the grasscloth!) to get the material to stick nice and tight in all spots.

This wall has five windows, each with two “returns,” meaning 10 surfaces to be wrapped with grasscloth, plus 10 surfaces between each window – not counting the strips of paper above and below the windows. All this took me seven hours. Tomorrow I will finish the area under the tops of the windows, plus one 2-strip wall (not shown).

This is a patterned grasscloth by Thibaut, and I hung it in the dining room / breakfast room of a newish home in Sienna Plantation between Pearland and Sugarland, south of Houston.

Patterned, Textured Grasscloth in a Dining Area

February 4, 2015

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A couple of shots of the two walls I hung today, a grasscloth with a damask-like pattern applied to it. This is somewhat unique, as most grasscloths are simply color and texture, but no pattern.

I love how this wallpaper is adding warmth and character to this room. The damask makes it elegant, yet the woven texture of the grasscloth adds a warmth and even a rustic feel – which go nicely with the rough-hewn dining table. Note how the chair upholstery coordinates with the grasscloth, too.

This wallpaper is by Thibaut Designs, and was hung in the eating area of a home in Sienna Plantation, near Sugarland and Pearland, near Houston.

Tricky Grasscloth Job

February 1, 2015

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OK, to you, it’s a beautiful entry cloaked in the warm color and texture of grasscloth. But there is a LOT of work that went into this – 2 1/2 days, in fact, not counting the day and a half to prep the space. Just the wall with the windows took FIVE HOURS.

There are several complicating factors. The bull nosed edges are always tough to trim around, and to get stiff grasscloth to bend and conform to. Bullnosed corners are tricky, too, because paper does not cut squarely like it does with squared corners and turns. The windows that need to have the paper wrapped into the recessed area can be time consuming. (there is a distant photo and a close up photo, but they are not next to one another, sorry). The curved wall presents challenges in keeping the paper straight and free of wrinkles. There was another very tricky strip that is not pictured, details too complicated to explain. Toss in some decorative molding to cut around. And the math and extra cutting required to balance the strips on each wall – centering the strips and trimming them to all be the same width. I included a few pictures of plain walls, so you can see the beautiful color and texture.

This particular grasscloth is uncharacteristically thin and malleable, and, to be honest, I don’t think this job would have turned out nearly as well as it did, if the homeowner had chosed a typical stiff grasscloth. The homeowners love it. And, I admit, I am proud of how it turned out.

This grasscloth was purchased through a decorator, and was hung in the entry way of a new home in Sienna Plantation, between Sugarland and Pearland, near Houston.