Posts Tagged ‘pro 977’

Stripping Off Old Wallpaper

February 14, 2018


This hall bathroom in a 1955 ranch-style home in the Briargrove / Tanglewood neighborhood of Houston was damaged by a roof leak during Hurricane Harvey. The contractor’s guys did a good job replacing drywall and painting the woodwork, but they fell short when it came to wallpaper. See first photo.

But this just gave the homeowner a chance to choose something that coordinated better with the decades-old tile that she loves (and that I love, too), and to pick a paper with more color and flair, that is more suited to her taste. See tomorrow’s post for that.

My first task was to remove the existing wallpaper. It turned out that there were two layers of paper, and, in some places, THREE layers.

In the second photo, I have removed most of the top (new) paper, which is the aqua trellis by Thibaut. I took it off by simply tearing it off the wall. Below it, you see the green savoy (small, tight, squiggly) by Waverly. Interestingly enough, I have hung this a bunch of times – in the ’90’s. 🙂

This paper was attached more tightly to the wall. To remove it, I had to first separate the top inked layer from it’s paper backing. You can see this in the second photo. Once the top layer, with it’s water-resistant acrylic surface was removed, it left behind a white paper backing. I used a sponge and bucket of hot water to soak the backing. It didn’t take long before the underlying paste reactivated, and then it was ready to let go of the wallpaper. You can see clean wall revealed in the photo, where the layers of wallpaper have come away.

In one area of the room, I got a surprise. There was a third layer of paper under the others. The top vinyl layer had been stripped of eons ago, but the tan, gritty paper backing was left on the wall. You can see this in the third photo dry (light tan) and soaked with water (dark tan). Once that tan paper backing got soaked enough with several spongings with hot water, the paste reactivated and the paper was happy to come away from the wall.

I was uncommonly lucky today, because whoever hung the original wallpaper had taken the time to prep the walls correctly. First, he skim-coated the textured walls to yield a smooth surface for the paper to adhere to. Second, he applied good quality penetrating sealer. This sealer might have been Gardz, a product that I use now, or another similar sealer, perhaps even a solvent-based (as opposed to water-based) sealer. His sealer provided a hard surface for the new paper to stick to, and also gave a surface that was resistant to all the water I was using to strip off the old wallpaper.

Check out the fourth picture to see the huge pile of wallpaper I pulled off this one small hall bathroom.

Once all the paper was off, the walls were in very good condition. There were no delaminated areas, no lifted areas, nothing that needed patching – just an amazingly intact surface.

I did a few little touch-ups to a few little areas (I wanted to clean up 60 years of grime collected along the top of the tile), and then rolled on my favorite wallpaper primer, by Roman’s, their Pro 977 / Ultra Prime. It’s a white pigmented primer, and is a wonderful surface to hang wallpaper on.

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Peeling Paper Caused by No Primer Underneath

September 22, 2017

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These wallpaper jobs are failing, mostly due to the fact that the previous installer did not prime the walls before hanging the paper.  With no primer, the walls are porous and will suck paste off the paper, leaving little to hold the paper on the wall.   Bathroom humidity has exacerbated the problem.

The top photo shows a paper-backed solid-vinyl paper, which are usually pre-pasted and lower-priced.  These are particularly bad for humid areas, because the paper backing tends to absorb humidity, expand, and push away from the wall.

The striped paper is a paper, which usually perform well and hold tightly to the wall even under humid conditions.  But with no primer to seal off the thirsty wall underneath, the paper has nothing to grab ahold of and is curling away from the wall.

In fact, when I went to strip the paper, it came off in whole sheets with just a gentle tug.  I had the entire bathroom stripped in, literally, about two minutes.

Before hanging the new paper, I will be sure to prime the walls.  The last photo (bottom row) shows two of the primers I will use.  The Pro 977 works on walls that are clean and have been previously sealed.  The Gardz is a penetrating sealer that is good for porous walls like flat paint, new drywall, or newly skim-floated walls.  It will also work on walls that have a bit of residual wallpaper paste because it seals it and makes it inert.

 

Spring Time in a Powder Room

July 7, 2017

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I forgot my camera yesterday, the day I stripped off the old paper and prepped the walls, so I cannot show you the 15 year-old wallpaper with its curling seams, due to 1.) being an inexpensive paper-backed solid vinyl wallpaper (my least favorite kind – do a Search here), and 2.) the previous installer did not prime the walls but instead hung the wallpaper directly on the new home’s bare Sheetrock, and 3.) age, heat, and humidity. The pattern, however, was not too dissimilar to this one, being a sort of “impressionistic painting” design in the same blue, pink, yellow, and green color scheme.

Anyway, the new powder room looks fantastic. The colors are similar to what the homeowner had before, but this wallpaper should hold up much better. The material is paper (not vinyl), and will hug the wall tightly. I removed every scrap of old paper and sealed the walls with a penetrating sealer named Gardz, and then primed with a wallpaper-specific primer called Roman’s Ultra Prime Pro 977.

On top of this good foundation, the new wallpaper is a pre-pasted, raised-ink paper by Thibaut, and is one of my favorite products to work with, and I also love it’s dependable performance down the road. The pattern is #6936, and is very similar to their “Augustine” hummingbird design (Do a Search here). I love the barely-discernible texture of these raised-ink papers. A unique printing process results in this effect.

This wallpaper pattern is by Thibaut Designs, and was bought at below retail price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. She is great at helping you find just the perfect paper! Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Wallpaper Primers

April 20, 2017

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There are lots of “wallpaper hangers” out there who slap paper up on the wall without a thought to prep. To do the job right, and to help ensure that the paper will stay on the wall for years to come, one of the basic steps is to apply a good primer.

There are different primers that will work under wallpaper. Here are a few that I use, depending on what the situation is in the room.

Roman’s Ultra Prime Pro 977 is a white-pigmented wallpaper-specific product, and it is my primer of choice.

But when I have skim-floated walls to smooth them, the new surface needs to be sealed, and Gardz is a wonderful product for that. It also seals and binds torn drywall. And it is also a good primer for wallpaper.

KILZ Original (oil-based) is called in when there are stains (water, rust, smoke, grease, etc.) or other problems that might bleed through the new wallpaper. For decades, KILZ was my go-to primer for wallpaper, too. But in recent years, to keep up with regulations from the EPA, the formula has changed. This primer may be more compatible with the environment, but the chemical make-up has changed, and wallpaper paste no longer wants to stick to it. So it’s used to seal stains, and then another wallpaper primer is applied on top of it.

Grrrrr!!! Defective Paper!

November 19, 2014

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Look closely, and you will see smudges, mis-prints, white specs, and other disappointing defects in this expensive, hand-screened wallpaper by Schumacher.

At first, I thought it wasn’t too noticeable. But the more strips that went up, and the more pieces I cut and prepped, and the more I looked at the very nice house and furnishings of these homeowners, the more I acknowledged that these people should not have wallpaper in their powder room with little defects here and there.

And these homeowners will be hosting a charity fund-raiser soon, and wanted their bathroom to be finished by then. I had an unexpected opening in my schedule and could get their room done in time for the event, and they paid a lot to have the wallpaer express-shipped. Now the room is stripped of its original paper, but the new paper cannot go up. Can you say “ugly”?

This is a real pain, to argue with the company that the paper is defective and should be replaced. Some companies really buck this (Did you know it’s always the paperhanger’s fault??!), even when you show them proof. Replacement wallpaper from the same run won’t do, because it likely contains the same defects. So we will have to wait until a new batch is printed and shipped, and when I have another opening when I can come back to finish this job.

We had ordered extra paper. But there was not enough to cut around the defects, and still accommodate the pattern repeat, and still have enough to paper all the walls. Luckily, I had only hung two strips, and had only pasted and booked the third. The industry standard is that, if you hang three strips, you (supposedly, according to the manufacturers) have accepted the product, and cannot complain about any defects, nor ask for compensation. Also, luckily, although we had four double rolls of wallpaper, I had only cut and trimmed one double roll. Manufacturers usually won’t replace any goods that have been cut, so we are good there.

On the other, unlucky side, when I stripped off the two pieces I had already hung, because they were half-dry, instead of stripping off in a 2-step process, they both tore some of my primer away from the wall, and even tore the Sheetrock in some places. This leaves something of a mess to be dealt with before the new paper can be hung.

Although the wall needs a little more work before it is smooth and sound enough for wallpaper, I went ahead and primed it again with Roman’s Ultra Prime, Pro 977, simply so that the homeowners would have a white wall, instead of a torn up wall, in case they have to have their party before the new paper arrives and can be hung.

The interior designer on this job is Meg Caldwell, and she says she has a good relationship with Schumacher, so she is dealing with trying to get the paper replaced, or a refund of money so the homeowners, can select something different.