Posts Tagged ‘remodeled’

Geometric Trellis in a Garden Oaks Attic Conversion Master Suite

May 1, 2018


I attended the Garden Oaks Home Tour yesterday, and walked up the stairs to the master suite, all the while thinking, “Something about this feels familiar.” When I got into the master bathroom, I got it – I had hung the wallpaper about two years ago!

What’s cool is, the wife had had the bathroom remodeled as a surprise gift for her hubby while he was overseas. Well, yesterday he was there, so I got to meet him. He said he positively loved the new bathroom.

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Faux Grasscloth With Hospitable Pineapples in a Powder Room – Compliments Yesterday’s Paper

December 16, 2016

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Pineapples are the universal sign of hospitality, and what gracious Southerner wouldn’t want that in her home? For this small powder room in the rear of a beautifully remodeled Meyerland (Houston) home, this homeowner was originally looking at a pattern that had pineapples plopped rhythmically across a strongly contrasting background color. I gave my honest opinion and told her I thought it looked too polka-dotty.

She listened, and took my suggestion to search a little further. What she found was this easier-on-the-eyes design, which has a much more interesting motif, that still incorporates the pineapple theme, and is also imposed on a warm background that mimics textural grasscloth.

What’s even cooler is that this couple had chosen a faux grasscloth for the entry of their home, which was just a few yards away from the powder room (see previous post). Even though both wallpapers were made by different companies, they look very similar, and that helps to unify the look and feel of the whole downstairs.

This wallpaper pattern is by Designer Wallpaper, in the Kenneth James line, pattern # PS 40700, and was bought at a below retail price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. She is great at helping you find just the perfect paper! Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Two Years of Barren Finally Beautified! (Coordinating Patterns)

October 29, 2016
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In yesterday’s post, I wrote about a family that has been living with a partially-remodeled powder room for more than two years. Today I got them one large step closer to being finished.

The once-drab, dark, and windowless room is now bright and crisp. An ikat trellis (“Bungalow”) was used on the walls, with a coordinating leopard print (“Tanzania”) on the ceiling. The trellis has a lot of movement due to the curved lines, so it really energizes the feel of the room.

The room had unplumb walls, unlevel crown molding, and bowed drywall, so it presented a bit of a challenge, and took me ’til after dark to finish. But the completed job looks great, and the homeowners are very happy.

Both wallpaper patterns are by Thibaut Designs. Two designs and colorways that are intended to work together are called coordinating or companion papers. This home is in the Memorial / Energy Corridor area of Houston.

Silvery Trees in a Powder Room

October 2, 2016
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This soft and silvery paper coordinates beautifully with the Carrera marble counter top and the tile floor in this guest bathroom in a nicely remodeled older home in the Houston Heights. (The builder is Ridgewater Homes, and I was very impressed with the quality of their work.)

As usual with the brand Schumacher, I had some printing defects, and also some smudging on the back of one roll (4th & 5th photos). Also, with their moth bally-smelling ink, as with other brands that use this ink, the seams curled at the points were the ink hit the seam (3rd photo). This is because the ink absorbs moisture from the paste differently from how the paper absorbs moisture, so they expand at different rates, causing curling at the seams.

Once the paper was good and dry, these areas mostly laid down, but there were still quite a few seams that were not perfectly flat.

The wallpaper pattern is named “Twiggy.” The interior designer for this job is Rachel Goetz, who works in the Heights area a lot, and has a soft, clean, uncluttered, fresh look to the rooms she decorates.

Classic Geometric in a Breakfast Area

August 27, 2016
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Geometric patterns are all the rage these days, but this one is less trendy and much more classic. Indeed, it is by Farrow & Ball, a British company, and who can be more traditional and classic than the Brits? 🙂

The kitchen in this 1960’s home in the Briarpark neighborhood of Houston has been very nicely remodeled. But the wife knew that plain paint in the breakfast nook wasn’t the vision she had for her home … Mixing modern and traditional, she chose this sculpted trellis by Farrow & Ball, in a grey-on-grey color scheme that coordinates really nicely with the paint on the kitchen cabinets, and with the décor in the rest of the house.

F&B also makes paint, and the company is known for using paint, instead of the more expected ink, on it’s wallpaper. The paint has a beautiful matt finish, and the printed areas display a lovely “raised ink” texture. I have also seen these painted wallpapers change color over time. And, the F&B papers are known for their seams that show “gaps and overlaps.” I didn’t get a picture, but today was no exception.

Textured Trellis in a Powder Room

August 12, 2016
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Here we are in a very nicely remodeled and updated ’60’s era ranch home in the Meyerland area of Houston. When I first met with this couple, they were wanting a grasscloth for their powder room. I took one look at their toddler and the one-on-the-way and told them that grasscloth, with its propensity to staining and bleeding, is a poor choice in rooms with grimy hands, splashing water, and little boys with bad aim. I also really dislike the shading and paneling (color variations between and within strips) that is so common with grasscloth.

I was glad that they took my advice and found something with the textured look and feel they were seeking, but that would hold up much better to their growing, active family. In addition to having a slight grass-like texture, the paper has a Moroccan trellis design. The color of the paper is almost the same as the paint that was in the room originally, but the trellis pattern takes the room from feeling blocky and cell-like to feeling more spacious and inviting.

The paper was nice to work with. I was particularly happy that the design did not cross the seams, meaning that there was no pattern to match at the seams. This enabled me to keep the motif at exactly the spot on the wall where I wanted it – in this case, 2 1/4″ down from the ceiling. Since walls are never plumb and floors and ceilings are never level, sometimes it will look like a pattern is sliding up or down the wall. Since I was able to maintain that 2 1/4″ spacing all the way around the room, you would never know that the ceiling is sloped a little.

This wallpaper pattern is by Carl Robinson, by Seabrook, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. She is great at helping you find just the perfect paper! Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Charcoal Phillip Jeffries Grasscloth in a Master Bedroom

June 18, 2015
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These days, I am papering so many accent walls, it was a refreshing change this week to put paper on all four walls of a master bedroom in a newly remodeled 1913 cottage in the Houston Heights. All the furniture and rugs in the room are white, and the bedside tables are smoky silver. The wallpaper is smoky charcoal in color, with a slight sheen to it – which the homeowner was not expecting. But when the paper went up, she really loved the satiny silky look, and it really set off the rest of the room. There is an immense crystal chandelier hanging from the ceiling, and it is positively riveting when set against the dark shimmery wallpaper.

This grasscloth is by designer Phillip Jeffries, which is a fairly high-end brand. Yet, like most grasscloths, this natural material is subject to color variations, such as shading and paneling (see Photos 2 & 3). Because the uneven color is often more concentrated on the outer edges of the wallpaper, sometimes it’s helpful to trim off those edges (Photo 4). But, as you can see, there will virtually always still be color variations from one strip to the next.

Because the seams on grasscloth are so readily visible, I also like to trim the material to fit the wall (balancing). In other words, instead of hanging two strips that are 36″ wide and one that is 10″ wide, I will trim the strips to all be 27 3/8″ wide. That gives a more balanced look. This plotting and measuring and trimming takes a lot more time, but I think the uniform look of the finished wall is worth it.

On dark papers like this, and because grasscloth does not always meet together at the seams perfectly, I like to stripe paint of a matching color under the seams (Photo 5), to hide any gaps that might appear between the strips.

The interior designer on this job is Rachel Goetz.  I like her decorating style, as well as the ease of working with her, very much.  http://www.rachelgoetzinteriors.com/

The Woods in a Powder Room

February 20, 2015

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People love this pattern, and this is at least my fourth time to hang it.

The fattest tree is a dominant feature in this pattern, and, as you can see in the third photo, I centered this tree above the sink and between the sconces. It will look super, when the mirror is hung, smack in the middle.

In the fourth photo, you see that the large tree is also centered on the rear wall. Reflected in the mirror, this will be a really cool effect. This took more than a little engineering, because, after you position the first strip, you don’t really have control over how the pattern falls on each subsequent strip. So it took a little finagling to get the tree to land in the center of that final wall over the cabinet.

This pattern has a strong diagonal theme. This 4-roll powder room is too small and chopped up for the secondary pattern to play out (the overall look of the pattern, as seen from a distance), but you see a little of it in the second photo, with the branch heading diagonally away from the fat tree trunk. The thinner branches reiterate the diagonal movement.

In the last shot, I am pointing out, again, that, if you choose a thick non-woven paper, expect to see the seams. That’s just how it is. But, really, hardly anyone notices that stuff but me. 🙂

This wallpaper pattern is called “Woods,” and is by Cole & Son, a British company, and is printed on the newish non-woven substrate that manufacturers are using more and more of these days. Non-wovens are breathable, and are designed to pull off the wall easily and in one piece, when it’s time to redecorate. I hung this in a powder room, above a beaded-board wainscoting, in the Memorial City area of Houston. The contractor who remodeled this powder room and the adjoining kitchen did a fantastic job. Wendell Smith. http://wendellrsmith.com/