Posts Tagged ‘repetitive’

William Morris “Fruit” in Historic 1885 Home

December 20, 2020

Moving from the entry to the adjoining dining room of the historic home in Houston mentioned in my two previous posts. This pattern by William Morris is called “Fruit,” and is true to the period in which the home was built.

I love the way the colors work with the wainscoting and also the picture rail around the top.

This pattern is less repetitive and the color is softer than the option used in the entry (see yesterday’s post), making it an easy-to-live-with choice for this large dining room.

The material is a traditional British pulp which you don’t see much these days, as most European manufacturers have moved to the newer non-woven substrates. I do like the pulps for their matt finish and tight adhesion to the wall. Although, they are brittle and tend to drag and tear when being cut, so they require some special handling.

This one also has a raised ink feature, which adds just a tad of texture. Look closely at the close-up shot.

This was purchased from FinestWallpaper.com, who has a large selection of Morris and also Voysey (another designer from that Arts & Crafts period) patterns. The home is in the Old Sixth Ward neighborhood in central inner-loop Houston.

Multiple Drop Pattern Match – Tricky Stuff!

August 14, 2018


Yesterday’s basket weave wallpaper pattern caught me off guard. The label said this was a drop match pattern. That means that you have “A” and “B” strips… On the A strips, a certain design motif (let’s say a sailboat) is at the top of the wall. On the next strip, the B strip, the sailboat will be dropped down a few inches. On the third strip, back to A, the sailboat will be back at the top of the wall.

So I started cutting a wall full of A and B strips. Luckily, a little bug in the back of my head told me to stop and plot.

Turns out this was not a simple drop pattern match with A and B strips. It was a multiple drop match, and the pattern spanned four strips. This meant that the pattern played out across four strips before that sailboat got back up at the top of the wall. Therefore I had A, B, C, and D, strips.

It’s a good thing that little bug screamed at me. If I had cut all my strips in the A and B sequence, half of my strips would have been in the wrong pattern match, and I would have either come up short of paper – or I would have had a whole lot of plotting and splicing and finagling to get the room done.

Multiple drop pattern matches do keep the design from appearing too repetitive. But they are not very common. However, they have been popping up more and more over the last year or two. I just wish that manufacturers would label their material correctly – that would help a lot to avoid costly mistakes.