Posts Tagged ‘rifle paper’

More Pictures of This Week’s ” Menagerie ” Wallpaper Install in Nursery

August 11, 2022
Closet corner before.
Closet corner after.
Window corner. Continuing the chair rail inside the window return would have made it difficult for the blinds to fit properly. So the carpenter ( Arcadio Morgado , who is unparalleled in craftsmanship and professionalism – email me if you want his contact info ) stopped the molding at the window edge, but painted that little 1/4″ lip.
I love the way the narrow strip of wallpaper looks falling down along the green wainscoting .
View from door of crib wall .
Close up. My clients love these peacocks !
Called Menagerie by Rifle Paper , which is made by York , one of my favorite brands .
Please see previous post for more information about this product and installation .

Animal Menagerie in Baby’s Nursery

August 10, 2022
What a cute pattern! Suited for a boy or girl, and will “grow” with the child for several years.
Before. The parents had this block paneling wainscoting added before the wallpaper went up. It keeps the wallpaper pattern from being overwhelming, and the green color really sets off the colors in the wallpaper.
Trees , flowers , forest animals , deer , leopards , peacocks , birds .
Made by Rifle Paper by York , one of my favorite brands.
Rifle Paper is a non-woven material , DIY – friendly , and designed to strip off the wall easily when it’s time to redecorate .

Peacock Wallpaper in Powder Room

July 3, 2022
An all-black powder room (walls, ceiling, floor) seemed like a moody, innovative idea. But it ended up being stark and uninteresting, not to mention claustrophobic.
A little wallpaper, still in a dark color, maintains the original idea, but lightens the mood (and brightens the room) a whole lot.
We decided to paper the sloped area under the stairs, but not the actual ceiling itself. This pattern and color on the ceiling would have been overwhelming.
Another shot of the wall and sloped area, opposite corner.
There’s nothing like spending an hour under the console sink! Besides all these pipes to cut around, note that the countertop is one mere inch away from the wall to the left.
Peacock by Rifle Paper is extremely popular, and I’ve hung it a number of times. Search here to see previous posts.
Interestingly enough, other brands have made their own versions, but homeowners still gravitate to this design.
The material is made by York , one of my favorite brands. It’s a non-woven paste-the-wall product. It’s much more durable and stain-resistant than paper wallpapers, and is designed to strip off the wall easily and with no damage to the wall when you’re ready to redecorate.
wallpaper installation houston

Popular Rifle Paper Peacock Pattern in Houston Heights Powder Room

June 11, 2022
In this townhome, the powder room is at the top of the stairs. The homeowner wanted something lively and dramatic to catch your eye as you walk from the garage up the stairs.
The bold and bright colors against a very dark green background, and fun flower and peacock design really answer the call!
Simply called Peacock Wallpaper , this very popular design is by Rifle Paper , which is manufactured by York , one of the oldest wallpaper manufacturers in the U.S.
It’s a non-woven , paste-the-wall material, and will hold up and resist stains very nicely for years to come.
N-W ‘s are also designed to strip off the wall easily and in one piece , with no damage to the wall , when it’s time to redecorate

Kill Point Over Door, Ridge, More

February 25, 2022
After you’ve hung wallpaper on all the walls in a room, the point where your last strip meets up with the first strip is called the kill point . This virtually always ends up in a pattern mis-match. That’s why you engineer to place it in an inconspicuous place, such as behind a door.
This powder room, though, had no hidden corner or handy door. That meant that I would have a pattern mis-match a full 5′ high, to the left of the toilet you see here. I prefer to have the pattern match in a corner like this. As you can see – it does. I will explain how I accomplished that.
I decided to place the kill point over the door. Even though this space is 2′ high and a mis-match might be noticeable, not many people are looking up over the door, so it’s a better choice than in a 5′ or 9′ long corner.
The dark smudges on the wall in the photo are where I’ve spread paint, to prevent white walls from peeking out, should the dark wallpaper shrink as the paste dries.
Here I’ve positioned the strip on the left. This leaves a gap of about 3″. Once I match the new strip up to the piece on the right, its pattern will not match perfectly with the strip on the left.
Now I’ve positioned both strips, and the one on the right is overlapping the one on the left.
Here’s an idea of what the pattern mis-match will look like. To be honest, it’s not all that bad, with this busy pattern and being up over the door. Still, I thought I could make it look better.
I’m going to do a double cut , which is our installers’ fancy term for a splice. I’m going to cut through the two strips, splicing them together, cutting along the vertical foliage elements, to minimize cut-off motifs and to disguise the splice.
When double cutting on the wall, it’s really important that you slice through the two layers of wallpaper only , and not cut into the primer or wall surface beneath. This is because, if the wall surface becomes scored or compromised, when the wallpaper paste dries and the paper shrinks and pulls taught, it can put tension on the wall surface. If the surface is not intact, it can give way and actually come apart ( delaminate ), resulting in wallpaper that comes away from the wall – and there’s nothing beneath it to paste it back to.
I’ve blogged about this before, so do a Search here to learn more. It’s important!
Anyway, to protect the wall beneath where I will make my splice cut, I’ve placed three layers of scrap wallpaper, to pad the wall. I figure I can cut through the two top layers, but not all five.
Note that three layers of non-woven material have some thickness, and can “throw off” the splice cut and prevent the top two strips from fitting together perfectly. In this case, the paper is flexible enough that I’m not worried about that particular scenario.
The strips are in place, and I’m ready to make my cut. I prefer to use a single-edged razor blade held in my fingers, rather than a blade-holder. What’s most important is that the blade be brand new and spankin’ sharp!
Here I’ve made my cut and am removing excess paper from the right side of the top strip. Look carefully and you can see how my razor blade followed the contours of the vertical foliage design elements.
Here I’ve removed the excess paper from the left edge of the bottom strip. You can see they are poised to fit together nicely.
Before fitting the two strips back together, though, I’m examining the wall surface. Check the photo carefully, and you’ll see that I did, after all, score into the primer. 😦 The surface below is skim-coat that was used to smooth a textured wall – and another potential layer that may come apart when exposed to tension from the drying wallpaper.
Shoulda used a Boggess Strip. https://www.steveboggesspaperhanging.com/lexanpage.htm
One way to prevent the wall from delaminating is to put something over the compromised area, to distribute the tension of the drying paper and take it away from the cut wall. Here I’ve taken a scrap of wallpaper, which is a tough non-woven material, and carefully peeled the printed surface from the white substrate (no pic of that process). Now I have a thin material that I can use to pad the wall.
I’m using the black printed side facing out, in case the spliced strips shrink a little – anything peeping out will be black and not noticeable.
Here is the bit of paper in place, spanning across the cut on the wall.
Now I’ve smoothed the two top strips back into place. Since my double cut followed along the vertical foliage elements as much as possible, and because I cut around the gold flowers to keep them full and round, the pattern looks like it matches up just about perfectly.
But wait! … What’s that lump / ridge under the wallpaper, the full height of the seam? That’s my seam padding! Doesn’t look great.
I’m really surprised at this. The non-woven wallpaper material is thick. But that’s why I pulled the top and bottom layers apart, to make my patch piece thinner. I guess not thin enough. Once dried, this ridge is going to be obvious.
But, to be honest, this is up over a door where no one’s going to be spending much time looking. In addition, once I get my 100 watt light bulb out of there and replace the homeowners’ original, small light fixture, this bump under the wallpaper will be pretty much indiscernable.
Still, that lump was buggin’ me. Another invention from my colleague Steve Bogges to the rescue! Pictured is his seam tape , which was made specifically for this type situation. This is very thin – yet strong – paper tape that is used to bridge cut areas like this, and prevent tension from drying wallpaper from tugging at unstable walls.
The tape has a pre-pasted side (the gloss you see), and feathered edges, to make it less noticeable under wallpaper.
Hard to see, but here I’ve placed the seam tape over the cut wall areas
Now the two top strips have been smoothed back into place. Amazingly, no bump from the seam tape beneath shows. And the pattern mis-match is barely visible, too.
Win-win!
All that’s left to do is to wipe paste off the surface of the wallpaper. This overlapping and splicing does mean that wallpaper paste will get on the surface of the strip underneath. Actually, there is a way to prevent that, and it also involves products from Steve Boggess
But … that’s a blog post for another day …
This pattern is called Peonies and is by Rifle Paper.

Fitting a Wide Strip into a Narrow Wall Space in a Corner

February 18, 2022
I have to cover 15″ width of wall with a strip of wallpaper that is 27″ wide. Working with that 27″ wide strip and pushing it into the corner, and getting paste all over the woodwork, and trying to not get creases in the paper … all very difficult.
My solution is to trim the wallpaper to fit the corner. Here the strip has already been cut, pasted, and booked (folded pasted-side-to-pasted-side). I’ve determined that I want the new strip to be 15″ wide. This will allow enough to cover the wall space, plus the 1/2″ inside the little space between the wall and the door trim.
Because wallpaper expands when it gets wet with paste, to get an accurate measurement, I’m trimming after the strip has been cut, pasted, and booked for a few minutes, and has expanded to its maximum.
This is called wet trimming. Alternately, dry trimming is when you measure and trim an unpasted and unfolded strip.
My straightedge is set at 15″ from the left edge of the wallpaper. I’ve used a single edge razor blade to make the cut.
Here is the strip in position on the wall. I’m using a plastic trapezoid squeegee wallpaper smoother to push the right edge into the small space between the wall and the door molding.
You can see how nicely the wallpaper wraps around the corner and tucks into that narrow space.
The pattern is called Garden Party and is by Rifle Paper, which is made by York, one of my favorite companies.

Popular Rifle Paper Peacocks in Powder Room

February 15, 2022
Primed walls in west Houston powder room.
Boy, people sure love this Peacock pattern by Rifle Paper (made by York). I’ve hung it a buncha times, and so far always in the dark colorways.
How unexpected, dramatic and fun in a tiny room!
This is a non-woven wallpaper material and a paste-the-wall installation method – although I prefer to paste the material, which certainly works better in a room with things to cut around and tuck paper behind like a toilet and pedestal sink.

Cheerful, Colorful Entry

February 13, 2022
The original color was a dull brown/tan. I skim-floated the textured walls to smooth them, and rolled on my wallpaper primer, above.
What a happy welcome as guests walk in the door! And much more suited to a young and active family.
The homeowner did a beautiful job of coordinating the blues and greens through other rooms in the house.
Rifle paper is made by York. The pattern is called Garden Party. Most Rifle Papers are on non-woven / paste the wall stock, but this was a traditional material where you paste the paper. Just about everything York makes gets an A+ in my book.
The home is in the Briar Forest area of west Houston.

Best Wallpaper Shopping at Rice Village Sherwin-Williams!

January 4, 2022

My favorite resource for finding your dream wallpaper is Dorota at the Sherwin-Williams store on University Blvd (contact info below). I stopped in to the store today to check out their huge selection. This is by far my favorite place to shop in Houston!

More than a hundred books, and a large table to spread them out on.
York One of my favorite brands! Lots of lines and options.
Thibaut Another of my all-time favorites. Just about everything they sell gets my stamp of approval!
A Street Prints Wonderful quality non-woven material, lots of fun patterns.
Brewster A great, dependable company that makes many lines under many names. Buy with confidence!
Seabrook has long roots in the U.S. Very good brand.
Rifle Paper A wonderful new line made by York, gaining popularity swiftly due to cute and innovative designs. Check out their Peacock.

No picture – Sherwin-Williams’s Easy Walls line is very good … It’s pre-pasted and a thin non-woven; easily hung and easily removed. I suspect it’s made by York, in their SureStrip line.

Essentials A compilation of other brands, most of which are good quality. A few “duds,” so consult with me or Dorota before buying. Overall, this line is the best of the lower-priced options.

Moving on to not-so-good (IMO)

Norwall Budget-priced, but long considered one of my least favored brands. Recently, though, I think they’ve improved their product. Plus, I think I have discovered a way to “tame the beast.” Still, better to avoid pre-pasted solid-vinyl products – see my page to the right.
Basix Pre-pasted, paper-backed, solid-vinyl – my least preferred of all the wallpapers out there. Cheap, yes. But … ya get what ya pay for. Please click and read my page to the right.
Mostly lower-end, pre-pasted paper-backed solid-vinyl materials … best to stick to brands at the top of the page.

NOTE: Avoid any and all peel & stick papers, including the S-W Easy Change line. Click and read my page to the right.

Where to Buy Wallpaper in Houston:

BEST OPTION FOR ASSISTANCE IN WALLPAPER SELECTION:  Dorota Hartwig is my No. 1 go-to for personal help finding your perfect paper.  At the Sherwin-Williams at 2525 University.  With 20+ years selling wallpaper, she knows what’s in all the books and can quickly help you narrow down the search.  Most major brands are available, with those wonderful S-W prices!  There are four parking spots in front of the store, but better is the free 2-hour parking on the shopping center roof across the street.  Her hours right now are Tuesday-Saturday, 9:00 a.m. – best to be there before 1:00 p.m.   – but that can change, so call first.  (713) 529-6515

In addition to the above in-store books, if you find something on-line, she may be able to get it for you. Here are some sure-bets:

Thibaut: Anna French; York: (Candice Olson, Ronald Redding, Stacy Garcia, Aviva Stanoff, Florence Broadhurst, Antonina Vella) Brewster (including Scandinavian Designs, Komar murals, Eijffinger, Warner, Crown and others); Wallquest, Seabrook, Astek, Galerie.

No reason to search anywhere else! Plus, as I mentioned, she knows what’s in ALL the books, so can track down exactly what you’re looking for, saving you time and hassle.

Rifle Paper Peacock in Heights Powder Room

December 31, 2021
Walls have been skim-floated smooth, primed, and are ready for wallpaper.
Note that the wall-mounted faucet and handles have been removed to make the wallpaper install easier, and to eliminate a lot of relief cuts.
This Peacock pattern is very popular. I’ve hung it a bunch of times.
Rifle Paper is made by York , one of my favorite brands. This product is a non-woven / paste-the-wall material.