Posts Tagged ‘schumacher’

Schumacher’s Acanthus Stripe on Grasscloth in a Downstairs Bathroom DRAFT

September 9, 2019

I hung this maybe a year ago, and was back to do another room, so took a quick photo.

The plumber got the sink a tad off-center – but with a room this gorgeous, who the heck would notice?!

Wallpaper Warming Up Rooms in August 2019 Southern Living Magazine

July 19, 2019


The first is called “Indian Flower” by Jasper, and I hung this very pattern a few months ago in a dining room.

The blue & white floral is called “Dianthus Chintz” by Soane Britain.

Third photo – the wallpaper’s on the ceiling! It’s “Santa Barbara Ikat” by Schumacher.

Blue powder room features Meg Braff Designs’ “Little Egypt.” Serena & Lily has one very similar to this. I love their paper, and it’s at a much lower price-point.

The horizontal (railroaded) stripe is a take on the current trend for exposed shiplap wood.

Last photo shows Clay McLaurin Studio’s “Santiago” in a very feminine bathroom.

Note that most of the wallpaper patterns you see in photo shoots like this are going to be higher-end products. Like I like to say, for every expensive company making an enviable design, there is someone else making a knock-off at a more affordable price.

See my page to the right for where to buy wallpaper in Houston.

Better Homes & Gardens Magazine Features Wallpaper, June 2019

June 6, 2019


This popular pattern is called “Queen of Spain” and is by Schumacher. In addition to the horizontal stripe formed by the droplet motifs, it has a vertical stripe pattern – but you need a larger wall to see that design play out.


You can get away with a really bold pattern in a small powder room. If they could have gotten a better shot inside this small room, you could see the full effect of this fun design.


Look closely – the wallpaper is on the ceiling. I believe this is “Channels” by Kelly Wearstler, another popular pattern.


Can’t say I love wallpaper on a ceiling, especially such a bold pattern and wild color – I think this cramps down the ceiling and closes in the room. Your thoughts?


This small background pattern behind the headboard is by Quadrille.

All of these papers pictured are higher-end brands. If you like the look but are on a budget, there is always something similar at a lower price. See my “Where to Buy Wallpaper” page to the right.

Two Pretty Blues Today

April 25, 2019


Another “all white” house gets a little personality and definition from a light dose of color and pattern. What a pleasant change!

The first three photos are Scalamandre’s “Balinese Peacock.” It came with a selvedge edge that had to be hand-trimmed off with a razor blade and a 6′ straight edge.

The last two photos are a fun elongated triangle floral stripe by Schumacher. My “after” sink photo didn’t come through, unfortunately, but the other pictures will give you an idea of the pattern.

Even though these papers are by two different manufacturers, the blue color is identical. It’s a lot brighter and prettier than my crummy camera depicts. The blue picks up hints of blue that the homeowner has in her living room (throw pillows) and in the dining room (navy blue paint above the wainscoting).

The peacock went in a small bar area off the living room, and the foliage stripe went in the under-the-stairs powder room that is right off the bar. The home is in the West University neighborhood of Houston.

Wallpaper in Midwest Living Magazine

March 12, 2019


These two rooms were featured in the March/April 2019 issue of Midwest Living.

The first wallpaper pattern is in an entry, and is by Schumacher, a well-established company. The bathroom pattern is by Jana Bek. She has some pretty interesting, coordinating lamps on her website. She sells linens, too – as you can see the curtains reflected in the vanity mirrors!

Don’t Let Your Toddler Handle a Sharpie!

February 11, 2019


So the little girl was innocently playing with an ink Sharpie, and, well, the wall along the bottom of the stairway just happened to get marked up. (Unfortunately, my “before’ photo got lost somewhere.) This is very expensive wallpaper, and, unfortunately, was the first thing you see when you enter this West University home.

I was there to hang paper in the nearby powder room. But every time I walked past this stairwell, the ink marks just kept bothering me.

So, with the homeowners’ go-ahead, I decided to fix it.

First, we checked to be sure there was enough left-over wallpaper. Thank goodness for boxes stashed in the garage apartment!

I didn’t want to strip off the original wallpaper, for fear of scoring the wall and causing seams to lift. So the original wallpaper was left intact.

Then the ink had to be covered with a stain blocker, to prevent them from bleeding through the new wallpaper. I used oil-based KILZ Original. Two coats.

Next, because wallpaper paste will no longer stick to oil-based products, (due to EPA-required changes to the formulas), I primed the whole area with Gardz.

Because it’s not a good idea to have a seam fall on top of a seam, at this time, I placed a strip of seam tape (special stuff made by a colleague of mine) so that it bridged the gap between the two seams of the original wallpaper. The Gardz sealer / primer melded everything together.

Then I took the left-over wallpaper and found the corresponding pattern to match the pattern on the wall. I used a scissors to cut around this design. Because this repair fell on a seam, it required two strips of paper, one on either side of the seam.

Then I pasted the wallpaper patches, allowed to book and sit, then appliqu├ęd them to the wall.

I was surprised at how stretchy and wrinkly the wet wallpaper was. I was glad that I was only doing two 18” high patches – I felt sorry for the guy who had hung a whole 2-story staircase and hallway of this stuff.

Bottom line – the finished patch looked fantastic. You could not tell that there had been any errant marks on the wall.

Here is a link to the wallpaper pattern. It is called Zumba ZigZag. https://www.fschumacher.com/item/5003300

Stretching the Paper to Avoid a Pattern Mismatch / Color Shading in Grasscloth

October 28, 2018


Two things about this photo. First, you can easily see the color difference between the narrow panel on the left, and the one to its right. You can also see that the color of the grasscloth darkens 2/3 of the way down the middle strip.

This variation in color is normal – even expected – in grasscloth, and is called “shading,” or “paneling.” It’s referred to as the “inherent beauty of this natural product.” But, personally, I don’t care for it.

Read my informative page to the right, to learn more about grasscloth.

Another thing to note … this corner is the last corner in the room to be papered. Virtually always, this last corner ends in a pattern mis-match – which can jar the eyes. So I placed it up over the door, in the least conspicuous space I could find.

Indeed, since the distance between the motif on the final strip did not sync with that on the first strip, the pattern was going to end up with a floral stem being split in the corner, leaving half of the greenery visible and half cut off. I didn’t want any cut off flower stems.

So I “grew” the paper. The distance between the flowers was supposed to be 5″. I used some scraps of paper to cut a strip 3.5″ wide, and another 4″ wide. This gave me an expansion of 7.5″ – wide enough to bridge the final distance without cutting off any flowers, but not wide enough for the eye to detect that the spacing was not exactly as the artist originally plotted.

The pattern is “Acanthus” and the manufacturer is Schumacher.

Metallic Ink Causing Curled Seams – Revisited

April 10, 2018

A year and a half ago I hung this wallpaper in a powder room. https://wallpaperlady.wordpress.com/2016/10/02/9056/ I complained then about how the metallic ink caused the seams to curl, just a tad, everywhere the ink crossed a seam. I was hoping that once the paper was good and dry, the seams would lie down flat.

Well, I was back at the home today because it was on the Heights Home Tour. I was disappointed to see that the ink was still curled at the seams. With the way the sconces threw light on it, I thought it was very noticeable.

Of course, everyone else was looking at the beautiful pattern and the lovely room. Still, I wish Schumacher (and all manufacturers) would pay more attention to how their products perform in people’s homes.

Workin’ On Ridding A Wrinkle

January 30, 2018


Even though this is a brand-new house, erected by a skilled custom builder, all of the walls, floor, and ceiling were off-plumb / unlevel. That’s not such a big deal when working with a wild abstract pattern or a typical floral. But when a geometric wallpaper pattern like this is applied to out-of-kilter walls, the resulting pattern match is going to be very visible.

In the top photo, the wall to the left is bowed. Trying to get a straight strip of wallpaper to fit into the crooked corner resulted in two very large (24″ high) wrinkles near the floor. That makes it difficult for my next strip of wallpaper to butt into the corner tightly, and to match the pattern, and still maintain its straight edge on the right side. This edge has to stay straight, because subsequent strips of wallpaper will be butted up against it.

My solution was to make some vertical “relief cuts,” following along the design motifs (top photo), from the baseboard up to the point where the wallpaper begins to torque out of shape. Because the wrinkles were so big, I had to make two vertical cuts, instead of just one, to ease the resulting pattern mis-match out over several inches, so it would be less noticeable.

When smoothed back into place, you could not see any pattern mismatch at all. (second photo)

Tight Trellis Forms a Muted Backdrop in a Heights Sitting Room

January 29, 2018


Here is an example of a bold pattern that doesn’t feel heavy at all. Because the design motifs are small, and because the color palette is kept to just two colors, the overall effect is not overwhelming. Instead, it creates the perfect backdrop for the light sconces and other furniture (not pictured) in this sitting room in a new home in the Heights neighborhood of Houston.

This wallpaper pattern is a classic, and is made by Schumacher, who has been manufacturing wallpaper for more than a hundred years. Look closely, and you can see the “raised ink” texture to the paper. The interior designer is Stacie Cokinos, of Cokinos Design. She works primarily on new-builds or whole-house remodels. Her look is fresh and crisp, but with a lot of warmth and living for real life tossed in.