Posts Tagged ‘Sharpie’

Don’t Write in Ink on the Wallpaper – or the Wall!!

August 25, 2017

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The contactor added wall light sconces on either side of the sink, and he also hung the heavy mirror.  For some reason, he roughed in where these objects were to be placed by marking the walls with a Sharpie ink marker, or something similar.

Folks – NEVER write on the wall with ink.  Nor with crayon, ballpoint pen, or the like.  The substances will eventually work their way through the wallpaper (as well as paint, wall texture, or a myriad of other surfaces), and will end up looking like ghost shadows.

Pencil is OK, and so is a light snap from a chalk line.  These materials won’t bleed through the new top layer of wallpaper.

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Towel Bars & Light Fixtures … Homeowner Input

July 13, 2017

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Before I start a job, I ask the homeowner if she is going to use the same towel bars, toilet paper holder, mirror, light fixtures, etc., or if she plans to replace them. Then I know if I should save the mounting hardware and replace the fixtures, or if I should remove these things and fill in the holes in the wall.

This homeowner was away from the house when I arrived, so she left good instructions as to what she wanted done. She marked the fixtures she plans to reuse, and she also marked the mirror hangers that are not to be reused. She used Sticky Notes, which will not damage the wall, and which will not cause marks that will bleed through the new wallpaper (like ink or a Sharpie will). She also arranged to have the mirror removed, because it was too heavy for me to handle. (Isn’t it nice to have a husband and a teenaged son around the house? 🙂 )

Black & White Trellis in a Heights Bungalow Kitchen

February 18, 2016
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I have not been papering many kitchens lately, so it was a treat to do this one, in a 100-year-old bungalow in the Heights (Houston). The homeowner was doing cosmetic updates, and working with the existing features, like a black & white checkered floor, black appliances, and a really cool old sink. She had a new bank of cabinets built over the stove, and added a black glossy tile backsplash around the stove, to cut down on cooking splatters that could stain the wallpaper.

The walls had seen decades of treatments, and they were kinda sketchy, so I skim-floated them to make them nice and smooth. There was nothing I could do, however, about the un-level and un-plumb walls, ceiling, and floors. With a wild floral pattern, you might not notice a crooked ceiling line. But with a rhythmic trellis, you will.

One wall was nice and straight along the ceiling line – but the other was not.

So, I had the choice of several options: I could hang the wallpaper so it would look straight across the ceiling, OR I could hang it so it looked straight against the woodwork, OR I could hang it so the pattern matched nicely in the corners.

I consulted with the homeowner, and she said, “No one will pay any attention to the ceiling line, but I would like the corners to look good.” I think she was right, that making the pattern match perfectly in the corners was the least eye-jarring, and the best way to go.

Oh, and I also called in a little help from my friend Mr. Sharpie, plus a little creative trimming and twisting and overlapping and tugging.

The wallpaper is only on a few sections of wall in this kitchen, but it makes a bold statement. And, as the homeowner said, “I love it, it fits – because I am bold, too!” (She is quite a vivacious lady!)

This is a paper wallpaper, and is not very resistant to stains. So, in the area around the dog’s food and water bowls, the homeowner will have a piece of clear Plexi-Glass cut to fit the space and then use small nails to discretely tack it to the wall. The Plexi-Glass can be easily wiped clean, and the wallpaper will be protected from stains.

This wallpaper pattern is in the Anderson Prints line by EcoChic, was nice to work with, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Repair on a Faux Finish Wallpaper

June 18, 2013

Digital ImagePainters got oil-based paint on this solid vinyl wallpaper. (Photo #1)  The homeowner tried several methods, but was unable to get it all off. Initially, she wanted me to remove two full-length strips and replace them. I balked at this, because 1.) It would use every scrap of paper she had left, leaving none for future repairs. 2.) There was a chance of a color difference between the paper Digital Imagethat had been on the wall, exposed to light for several years and the paper kept on the roll in a closet. 3.) It’s hard to strip paper without doing damage to an adjoining sheet you want to keep on the wall. 4.) It’s hard to put a new wet strip of paper next to an existing dry strip and have them work together as well as if they had been hung at the same time.

Digital ImageSo instead I did a patch.

This solid vinyl paper is fairly thick, and a patch on top would be raised up a little bit. To minimize this, I removed the thick paper backing, by soaking the paper in water and then pulling the backing away from the vinyl surface. I used a plastic dish “scrubbie” to get the final bits of paper off the back. This leDigital Imageft a nice, thin sheet of colored vinyl paper.

There was no pattern to match, which made the task much easier. I cut a piece large enough to cover the stain, rounding the edges to minimize the chances of any edges that might want to pull up.  (Photo #2)

Then the patch was pasted with vinyl-to-vinyl paste.  (Photo #3)This special adhesive is important because regular paste won’t stick to the slick vinyl papers. Then the patch was put in place, smoothed, and excess paste was wiped off.

Voilà! You absolutely cannot see the patch!  (Photo #4)

On another area with lesser staining (not pictured), I was able to use paints and a black Sharpie to disguise the flaws.