Posts Tagged ‘skim floating’

Washing Texture Off of Walls

March 5, 2020


The owners of this new-build home in the Garden Oaks neighborhood of Houston knew that they wanted wallpaper in the dining room and powder room. So they instructed the builder to not texture the walls.

Well, as often happens, the drywall/paint guys didn’t get the message, so while they were spraying texture on the other walls in the home, they also textured the dining and powder rooms (sorry, no picture).

But – they got stopped before they primed or painted. This is good.

The textured surface had to be smoothed before wallpaper could go up. I’m quite good at skim-floating, and I quoted the homeowners a price for me to float and sand the walls smooth.

But the homeowner is also pretty handy. He opted to smooth the walls himself.

Since no primer or paint had been applied, the texture on the walls was raw mud (drywall joint compound). With no coating on it, this stuff is water-soluble. That means that the homeowner could simply wipe the walls with a wet sponge to remove the texture.

Well, it’s actually a bit more than that. You have to wet the walls well, and keep on scrubbing, to the point where the joint compound / texture softens up and can be scraped off the wall with a stiff putty knife, or scrubbed off the wall with a drywall sponge.

And that’s what the homeowner did. He did such a good job that he cleaned the walls all the way down to the bare drywall. That’s what you see in the first two photos. This guy was way more thorough and meticulous than any “professional” I’ve seen out there.

The best primer for bare drywall is Gardz (third photo). It penetrates and seals both the paper face of the drywall, as well as the joint compound “mud” that is troweled over the joints and tape (see white areas in photos).

So my task for today was not to work on smoothing the walls, because the homeonwer had done such a great job of that. OK, well, I did do a little tweaking in a few areas. But primarily, what I did today was roll on (and cut into the corners and edges) a good coat of Gardz.

Besides sealing drywall, Gardz is a good primer for wallpaper. So once the primer was applied and then dried (about an hour), the room was ready for wallpaper.

If You Want Smooth Walls, You’ve Gotta Put Up With a Little Dust

July 7, 2018


The walls in this house had a pretty heavy texture, which I wanted to smooth before hanging their wallpaper. This involves skim floating the walls with joint compound (commonly referred to as mud). Do a search on those terms here to learn more about this process.

Once the mud is dry, I sand it smooth. This makes a dust – and the thicker the wall texture, the more the dust. Here you see what has accumulated on the floor after sanding.

Don’t worry – I bring in my Shop Vac and clean all the dust up.

Drying Walls

July 7, 2016

Digital Image

Digital Image


These walls have a thick texture that needed to be smoothed before I could hang the new wallpaper. In the photo, I have finished skim floating the walls with mud (joint compound). Now they need to dry, before I can sand them smooth.

The homeowner has the air conditioning cranking away, which helps to pull humidity and moisture out of the smoothing compound. In addition, I have set up fans to move air around the walls. Two box fans are affixed to the shelves on ladders (secured with bungee cords), and one very powerful fan is sitting on the floor aimed up at the wall.

Sometimes the joint compound can be induced to dry in an hour or two this way. But in this case, because the texture was so thick, and because the semi-gloss paint beneath the smoothing compound slows drying, I needed to let this set-up run for a few hours. The fans sped up the drying process, and once they were turned off, the walls were left overnight to dry further.

Come morning, I was able to proceed with sanding and the rest of the prep and installation of the new wallpaper.

It Takes THIS To Cover A Screw Hole?!

August 8, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

The white on my fingers is from the joint compound I am “skim floating” onto the walls, to smooth this textured surface.  Don’t pay any attention to it.

But the white globs on the wall are from someone (the homeowner)’s? attempt to fill in two small holes from screws that once held drapery brackets.

Folks! The idea is to make the fill-in patch small, flat, and undetectable.

I don’t know what material was used, but it was thick and spongy and impossible to sand smooth. I used a putty knife to scrape off what I could, then had to float over it with a smooth coat of joint compound. It ended up nice and smooth, but still a little humped up.

Next time, folks, if there are holes in the wall, let ME do the patching.