Posts Tagged ‘southern living magazine’

Southern Living Mag – Vinyl Wallpaper in a Humid Room – I Beg to Differ

March 19, 2014

In the January 2014 issue of Southern Living Magazine, I was pleased to see one of the feature homes showcase several rooms with wallpaper.

One of the rooms was a laundry room, and the interior designer made the point that since the space was exposed to more moisture, she chose a paper that had a glossy vinyl coating – “to protect it from water damage.”

Oh, folks! Let me get up on my soapbox! This is a big issue with me, so much so that I often give my clients touch-and-feel samples of what to buy and what to not buy. While it’s correct that splashes of water will run right off a solid vinyl wallpaper, if that wallcovering has a paper backing, as most do, humidity can be the death of it. Based on what I have seen in homes over the last two decades, I always advise AGAINST paper-backed vinyl in humid rooms like laundries or bathrooms.

The reason is that the paper backing will absorb humidity from the air. The paper backing swells; the vinyl surface does not. So the paper stretches and the vinyl can’t, so it curls. As time goes on, the vinyl might even delaminate (detach) from the paper backing. You end up with seams that curl forward and leave gaps at the wall. These are not loose seams, and cannot be pasted back down.

Now, there are ways to deal with this – In most of the rooms I have seen, the previous installer did not use a primer before hanging the paper. And proper ventilation of the room is a must. In addition, these days, there are options of woven fabric-backed solid vinyl papers, and also the new non-woven materials, both of which hold up to humidity better than the old paper backings.

If in doubt, ask me.

http://www.southernliving.com/home-garden/decorating/decorating-resolutions-00417000086328/

Southern Living and Elegant Dining Room Wallpaper

November 21, 2012

The Novemer 2012 issue of Southern Living Magazine is all about serving fancy dinners in fancy dining rooms. There is a several-page spread showing how several interior designers have styled their dining spaces.

The largest photo is of a very formal dining room, dominated by an ornate, 10′ tall gilt mirror. The wallpaper is a gold damask. But the show stopper is the ceiling. As the Editor’s Tip says, “Wallpaper the ceiling to give any room more patina and depth of color.”

Wallpaper?! What’s on that ceiling is way beyond regular wallpaper! From the looks of it, I’d say it’s real gold leaf, possibly the Vahallan brand, or something similar. Instead of strips that span the room, it appears to be squares or blocks of material, pieced together in a planned pattern. It looks kind of swirly and cloud-like, but in a gold color. It’s light enough to not crowd in on the room, and the mottely motif certainly adds patina. Truely magnificant.

Check out what Vahallan is up to: http://www.vahallan.com/

Wallpaper Murals and Southern Charm

November 12, 2012

The current issue of Southern Living Magazine (November 2012) is all about entertaining and hosting big dinners. There is a several-page-spread showing how three different interior designers like to dress up a dining room for a Thanksgiving dinner. Following that is a page of another designer’s tips on setting up a bar.

Sure, the cocktails looked great. But what caught MY eye is the beautiful wallpaper mural behind the bar. It’s a positively gorgeous scene of a pond with water lilies and storks, foliage in the background, all in shades of turquoise and ice blue.

What’s timely is that two members of the National Guild of Professional Paperhangers have been posting on our FaceBook page about their recent install of a Zuber brand 21-panels-at-$1000-each hand-painted mural in a dining room, complete with photos.

I have seen a good number of such murals in older River Oaks homes, many of them dating back to when the home was built (1920’s-’40’s). This is a truely classic look that I just love, and I’m glad to see it continuing in traditional styled homes.

The FB page of the NGPP is open to the public, BTW. Discussions tend to get a little technical, but you might want to take a look.