Posts Tagged ‘stain blocker’

Preventing Stains by Sealing Ink with KILZ

December 8, 2016

Digital Image

Digital Image


See that red vertical line just to the right of the paint can? The previous wallpaper installer had used a red Magic Marker to color the edges of his vinyl wallpaper. This is a good way to cover the white edges so the seams don’t show, especially with a dark paper. But it’s better to use chalk or colored pencils, because oil or ink can bleed through and will stain the new wallpaper or paint.

In this photo, the previous dark red wallpaper has been stripped off, but the red ink that was used to color the seam’s edges has soaked into the wall. The wall has been skim-floated with a light coat joint compound and then primed with the penetrating sealer Gardz. Yet the red ink has bled through. If wallpaper is hung over this red line, it is quite likely that, over time, the ink will work its way through the various layers and up to the surface.

The best way to prevent that is to use a stain-blocker. KILZ Original oil-based sealer and stain blocker is about the best product on the market for this. Brush it on, it dries quickly, and then you are safe to apply wallpaper, paint, or other materials.

KILZ will also block stains from oil, smoke, rust, water, ink, crayon, tobacco, and more.

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Ink Is an Enemy of Wallpaper!

August 25, 2014

Digital ImageThe Sheetrock on this job has a lot of tears, so to get it ready for wallpaper, I am skim-floating it, to smooth it. The horizontal red line and the red numbers you see are where someone wrote on the wall in red ink, way back in the ’60’s when this Clear Lake home was built. Mirrors covered this wall for decades, so the ink never showed.

But if I were to hang wallpaper over this ink, it would, rather quickly, I am betting, work its way through the paper and show up on the surface. Several substances will do that, including blood, rust, water stains, grease, and ink – which is why we contractors (are supposed to) only use pencil when writing on walls.

The best product to seal this ink is oil-based KILZ, which is a wonderful sealer and stain blocker. However, putting an oil-based product on top of another oil-based product, like ink, sometimes does not work well. So here I have gone over the ink with joint compound. I have found that “mud,” as we call it, contains stains a little better, plus it is porous and allows the sealer to soak in, creating a better seal. As you can see, the ink is working its way through the joint compound, too.

So, once the mud is dry and sanded, I am going to put Gardz on the area. Gardz is a very thin, watery sealer that will soak into the mud, hopefully sealing it. Just to be sure, I will add another layer of mud over that. Once that is dry, I will apply a coat of KILZ. If the stains continue to show through, I will apply more coats of KILZ, and possibly more coats of mud, as well.