Posts Tagged ‘strip’

The Perfect Pattern for a Lady’s Bathroom

October 5, 2017

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image


I love this artist’s-swath-of-ink-hand-drawn-design of lovely ladies for a single gal’s private bathroom. It goes nicely with the white and minimalist theme of this contemporary style townhome in the Midtown area just south of downtown Houston.

Even though the design has lots of movement, it does not feel busy, because the palette is limited to black and white.

This pattern is by York, in their Sure Strip line, which is designed to strip off the wall easily and with no damage to the wall when its time to redecorate. But don’t worry – it will stick nice and tight in the interim.

The wallpaper was bought at below retail price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. She is great at helping you find just the perfect paper! Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Advertisements

Peeling Paper Caused by No Primer Underneath

September 22, 2017

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

These wallpaper jobs are failing, mostly due to the fact that the previous installer did not prime the walls before hanging the paper.  With no primer, the walls are porous and will suck paste off the paper, leaving little to hold the paper on the wall.   Bathroom humidity has exacerbated the problem.

The top photo shows a paper-backed solid-vinyl paper, which are usually pre-pasted and lower-priced.  These are particularly bad for humid areas, because the paper backing tends to absorb humidity, expand, and push away from the wall.

The striped paper is a paper, which usually perform well and hold tightly to the wall even under humid conditions.  But with no primer to seal off the thirsty wall underneath, the paper has nothing to grab ahold of and is curling away from the wall.

In fact, when I went to strip the paper, it came off in whole sheets with just a gentle tug.  I had the entire bathroom stripped in, literally, about two minutes.

Before hanging the new paper, I will be sure to prime the walls.  The last photo (bottom row) shows two of the primers I will use.  The Pro 977 works on walls that are clean and have been previously sealed.  The Gardz is a penetrating sealer that is good for porous walls like flat paint, new drywall, or newly skim-floated walls.  It will also work on walls that have a bit of residual wallpaper paste because it seals it and makes it inert.

 

Painting Grasscloth is NOT a Good Idea

September 2, 2017

Digital Image

Digital Image

This room was originally wallpapered with an olive green grasscloth. Then, perhaps to “update” the room before putting the house on the market, the grasscloth was painted over with tan paint.

Folks, this is a bad idea. For one thing, it just looks bad. Look at the second picture. The paint is dull and lifeless, and takes away the depth and natural look of the grasscloth material.

Secondly, it makes the material virtually impossible to remove. The paint soaks into the fibers, congealing into one hard, solid, stiff mass. Pulling this stuff off the wall took about the most physical strength that I have ever had to use to strip wallpaper.

The pity is that they could have simply taken a few steps to properly remove the grasscloth.

Innovative Kill Point – Between Moldings

August 4, 2017

Digital Image

Digital Image


The kill point is where the last strip you hang meets up with the first strip you hung. This virtually always ends up in a mis-match of the pattern’s design. This is usually in a corner, and the paperhanger will try to place it in an inconspicuous location (such as behind a door).

But not all corners are hidden behind a door. In such cases, and depending on the design, the pattern mis-match will be noticeable, even eye-jarring.

Sometimes it’s possible to get creative and hide that kill point where it will be less visible. That’s what I was able to do today.

The first photo shows you the Chinoiserie pattern, so you get an idea of what it looks like. In this room, because all four corners were very visible, I wanted to keep the pattern intact in the corners. So I needed somewhere else to hide the kill point.

The room had a spot where the molding around the door came very close (6″) to the wall-hung linen cabinet. This was a good option to place the kill point, because it would be only 6″ wide, vs. my other option, which was a corner that was 5′ high. I’ll take a 6″ mis-match over a 5′ mis-match any day!

By manipulating the wallpaper pattern a little, it was easy to disguise the kill point and the mis-matched pattern. It’s there, in the second photo – but I’ll bet you will have a hard time spotting it.

Fun Geometric Wallpaper in a High School Teen’s Bedroom

March 3, 2017
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

What 15 year old girl would not love this wallpaper pattern?! And when she leaves for college and her room gets turned over to guests, the paper will still be perfect!

One photo shows the use of my laser level, to be sure the first strip hangs perfectly plumb. I measured and centered the pattern on the wall horizontally, so it would fall perfectly behind the arched headboard, and the laser level was also useful to mark the spot for that fist strip to land.

This wallpaper pattern went on one accent wall, and the black ceiling really sets the room off! It is called “Riviera” and is by Cole & Son, a British company. It is on a thickish non-woven stock, and was a paste-the-wall install process.  Don’t tell anyone, but I think it looks a little like grasshopper heads.  🙂

The interior designers for this job are Neal LeBouef and Anthony Stransky, of L Design Group. Wonderful guys, and I love their crisp, clean, sophisticated style. The home is in West University Place (Houston).

Clever Kill Point

January 1, 2017
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image


The “kill point” in a room is the last corner, where your last strip of wallpaper comes to meet up with the first strip. It almost always results in a pattern mis-match, so you try to hide it in an inconspicuous place.

All of the corners in this bedroom went floor-to-ceiling, and the eye would really notice a 10′ mis-match. So I put the kill point at the top of this corner, about 2′ of mismatch. Then I wrapped the rest of the paper around the corner as I normally do, ending up at the right edge of the door molding. This way, I was able to keep the pattern matching perfectly for the lower 8′ of the corner. Where the lower paper meets the strip above the bar of the rolling door, the thick bar hides the 3″ overlap and mis-matched design .

The pattern motif below the bar does not line up vertically with the motif over the bar, but who the heck is going to notice that? And even the 2′ of mis-matched design at the top of the corner is hardly noticeable, due to the busy pattern.

Viney Floral in a Master Bathroom

June 9, 2016
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

On the more traditional side, this flower-and-branch pattern worked beautifully in a master bathroom in an early 20th century home in the Montrose neighborhood of Houston. The bathroom had been redone, including new slate-grey tile around the shower; the wallpaper coordinated beautifully with the tile.

The homeowner loved it. He kept saying that it was the best decorating dollars he had ever spent, and that he would have to spend the night in the bathroom, because he wanted to be able to see it every time he woke up.

The pattern has an interesting shadowed effect – it looks as if light is coming in through windows and casting shadows on the wallpaper. This is a good example of why you should always look at room-set photos on-line and in the selection books, so you can see how the pattern plays out on a large scale. If all you saw was a 10″ sample, you would not realize that the overall pattern included this shadowy look.

This wallpaper is by York, and is in their SureStrip line. I really love these ShurStrip papers. They are the newer non-woven materials, but are thin and easy to work with (as opposed to some that are thick, stiff, spongy, and … er… icky), and will hug the wall and stay in place without peeling or curling for years to come. They are also designed to strip off the wall (relatively) easily, when you are ready to redecorate.

Hanging a Pre-Pasted Wallpaper

December 15, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image


Pre-pasted wallpapers can be vinyl, paper, or non-woven. This particular wallpaper is comprised of a layer of solid vinyl bonded to a yellowy-brown paper backing, and is pre-pasted. This means that a thin layer of dry paste has been embedded onto the back, so all you have to do is dip it in water to activate the paste.

Most of my friends snicker at this method, believing it to be amateur and DIY-ish. I, however, really like most pre-pasted wallpapers, and find them much quicker to hang, and sometimes I can even get away with rolling the paper out on the floor, instead of lugging in my big, loppy pasting table.

In the photo, you see my green trough filled with water, sitting on towels, on top of plastic. A strip of wallpaper has been cut to the appropriate length, rolled up, and has been inserted into the water. As the strip is unrolled, the backing is exposed to the water, activating the paste. Near the bottom of the photo, part of the wet wallpaper has been loosely folded onto itself, pasted-side-to-pasted side. This is called booking. Way to the left of the photo is a strip that has been completely pasted and booked, and is now sitting for a few minutes before being taken to the wall.

This waiting period is an important step, because it allows all the paste to become activated equally, it allows all the paper backing to absorb water and expand to a uniform width, excess water can run off, bubbling on the wall is minimized, it makes the wet, sticky, slippery material much easier to handle, as well as other benefits.

When working with pre-pasted papers, I usually run a little bit of paste around the corners, baseboards, and ceiling line, and roll a very light coat of paste onto the wall, particularly where the seams will hit, to augment the manufacturer’s paste already on the back of the paper.

Once the booked strip has sat for the right length of time, it is taken to the wall, the top portion is unbooked, positioned, smoothed, trimmed, and then ditto with the lower portion.

I find the whole process much faster than when you have to paste each strip on the table, and everything else about the installation (adhesion, workability, slip, expansion/shrinking, strength, etc.) is about the same as with hand-pasted papers.

Wiggly Waverly Waves for a Baby’s Room

November 14, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Boy, I sure am doing a lot of baby’s and children’s rooms lately!

These parents-to-be chose a cute pattern with lots of motion in a gender-neutral color, that is not too “babyish” and will be well-suited as the child grows.

This pattern is by Waverly, an older and once very popular brand that was bought by York Wallcoverings some years back. I hung a lot of Waverly in the early ’90’s, and am glad to see it still around – same nice quality, but the patterns are less flowery and much more modern and fun.

This was in York’s Sure Strip line, which is designed to strip off the wall easily when it’s time to redecorate. It is a thin, flexible non-woven material, which hugs the wall better and is much easier to work with and trim than the thick material I hung earlier in the week (read previous posts). It is also pre-pasted, which is quicker and takes less effort and mess to hang.

I wouldn’t mind hanging this stuff every day. And I’m sure the baby will be tickled with his (or her) new room!

I hung this wallpaper on an accent wall / feature wall in a new home of a young couple in Montrose, Houston. It was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Wavy Laser Line – What’s Up?!

July 29, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Wow – the line from my laser level projected onto the wall is nowhere near straight! What’s up?

The wall is bowed – in many directions … horizontally, vertically, and in various spots, but particularly in the center. I suspect there might have been a door on this wall, that was removed and Sheetrocked over, and perhaps they didn’t get the new framing straight. It was hard to float the wall (to smooth it), too, because my flat trowel kept skipping over the dipped areas.

When I moved my laser line to the left edge of the strip, I was able to get a straight line, and the wallpaper hung nice and straight and true to plumb.

Interestingly, this is the third or fourth house with bowed walls I have worked in in two weeks. Some were new homes, some were remodeled homes, and this one is a ’60’s era one that has had many improvements done to it over the years.