Posts Tagged ‘texture’

Fun Neutral-Toned Broken Lines Pattern in Pool Bathroom

October 16, 2021
Pool bathroom before.
Done!
Close-up. The paper has a light texture, which emphasizes the scratchy print of the design. It almost looks like someone dyed strips of tissue paper and laid them abstractly on canvas.
A Street Prints makes nice wallpaper, and this one was a joy to work with. It is a non-woven material. It can be hung via the paste-the-wall method, but I prefer to paste the paper.

This very contemporary new home is in the Hilshire Village neighborhood of the Spring Branch area of Houston.

Cole & Son Florencecourt in Meyerland (Houston) Powder Room

September 3, 2021
Before, primed and ready for wallpaper.
After.
I love the muted charcoal-and-cream colors with the marble vanity top. In addition, there are small brown flecks here and there, which help tie it to the floor tiles and the burnished gold mirror.
The pattern has a slight “raised ink” texture – hard to see here, but lovely in person.

This is a non-woven material. It can be hung with the paste-the-wall method, but I wanted the flexibility created by pasting the paper.

Cole and Son is a British company. Most everything they make is very nice.

Another “Big Girl’s Room”

August 7, 2021
Before. Getting ready to apply wallpaper primer.
Finished accent wall.
This is a non-woven material, so can be hung via the paste-the-wall method. And no corners to turn. So no need to lug in my big table! Here I’m measuring the strips on the floor, and then rolled them inside-out and secured with elastic hairbands. This keeps the surface from bumping into the pasted wall during installation. The white 5 gallon bucket with the red lid is my paste, and on the ladder shelf is the paste roller and an angled brush for getting the paste into the corners and edges.
The pattern is called “Sakura”
Close-up shows the “raised ink” slight texture. This is unusual for non-woven papers, and I liked the effect.
A Street Prints, by Brewster, is a good, dependable brand, with a lot of pattern themes and choices.

This young family recently moved back to their house in the Houston Heights after several years overseas in Malaysia. The daughter is ready for a room of her own. An accent wall covered with “Sakura” by A Street Prints is reminiscent of cherry blossoms on trees in the Orient.

Pewter Cork in West U. Powder Room

August 5, 2021
Before
Finished
Looks super with antiqued brass faucet and handles. Notice metallic flecks of copper within the pewter surface.
Looking up at corner over the toilet and under the stairs. Notice that the material is made up of 7″ squares of cork. A 3′ x 3′ swatch of ceiling was left white; the dark cork material over every square inch of space would have made the room dark and claustrophobic.
When it’s got her name on it, you know it’s going to be glam and glitz! The Candice Olson line is made by York, one of my favorite brands.

At first, I didn’t think the contemporary feel of this metallic wallpaper would look good with the homeowner’s traditional style furniture, including this family heirloom console vanity base. But once the room was finished – it’s darned handsome!

Hard to see in the second photo, but there was a gap of only about 1/4″ on either side of the granite countertop. And about 1″ between the wooden cabinet and the wall. It definitely took some gymnastics and ingenuity to get the wallpaper into those spaces and smoothed against the wall.

Cork is a natural material, and you should expect some inconsistencies in color, pattern, and texture. It’s also lots thicker than most papers, so seams will be more visible.

The home is in the West University neighborhood of central Houston.

Grasscloth on Bookshelf Backs – Railroaded

July 29, 2021
Before, with my primer in four cubbies, two more to go, and my fan set up to get it to dry faster.
Finished.
“Railroading” means the paper was run horizontally, instead of vertically. With grasscloth, this means the reeds ran up and down, instead of sideways. This technique eliminated seams (run the usual way would have given us a seam smack down the center of the shelf area – a decorating no-no).
I was able to slide the edges of the paper under the back side of the wooden shelves. No trimming needed. And no gaps showing between the wall and the shelves.
For this stiff grasscloth material, instead of my softer, natural-bristle smoothing brush (right), I chose a stiffer, plastic-bristled brush.
Showing the texture and natural material of the grasscloth. And how the dye stained my fingers!
Manufacturer is York, a very good company.

The home is in the Heights neighborhood of Houston.

Van Gogh Inspired Wallpaper

July 14, 2021
Powder room was bland white before, with questionable wall texture. Here I have rolled on my wallpaper primer.
Paper is up.
All decked out. Note the mixed metals of chrome, burnished gold, and brushed nickel, which is quite trendy right now.
Close-up shows textured surface that mimics a real oil painting.
Van Gogh Museum brand. Pattern is called “Almond Blossom.”

“What a transformation!” cried the homeowner, when she saw her formerly boring, boxy powder room now color-filled and cheerful. “I’ll have to keep the door open from now on.”

The home is in the Heights neighborhood of Houston.

Tight Pattern in Fleur-De-Lis Mimics Texture from a Distance

July 11, 2021

My “after” full-wall photo didn’t turn out, so you’ll just have to look at the close-up shots.

From a distance, this small, tight pattern with subtle movement looks like a textured wall. It forms a comforting backdrop to the furnishings and activities in this large central area in the home.

This is a clay-coated, hand screened print, and is made by Relativity, a small outfit operating out of Chicago.

The wallpaper went up nicely enough.

Serena & Lily “Feather” in Houston Play Room

June 12, 2021

The original all-white walls didn’t do much to make this play room for young kids feel fun. Mom chose “Feather” by Serena & Lily to pump it up a couple of notches!

In the close-up photo, you can see the irregular lines of this design, as well as the hand-painted, watercolor-y look. The material has a slight “raised ink” texture.

You might think the pattern is a little busy now, but once the furniture is back in place and the artwork goes up, the room will feel more balanced.

The homeowners also commented that the pattern on the walls makes the room feel bigger and less “lost” than with the all-white look.

The home is in the Braes Heights neighborhood of southwest inner Loop Houston. The wallpaper is called “Feather” and is by Serena & Lily – one of my favorite brands.

Getting Smoothing Compound to Dry Quickly

May 5, 2021

In my previous post, the wall had the thick, knock-down texture that is typical in new tract homes in the Houston area. You can’t hang wallpaper on this texture, because it looks bad under the paper, and because it interferes with good adhesion.

The solution is to “skim-float” the walls with joint compound, a.k.a. “mud,” which is much like plaster. The mud needs time to dry. When the texture on the walls is super heavy, as in this home, I usually let the smoothing compound dry overnight. That does add an extra day – and an extra day’s cost – to the job.

To save these homeowners from paying for that extra day, we pulled out all the stops. In this photo, you see my two box fans and my heavy-duty black floor fan blasting away at the wall. In addition, we have the room’s ceiling fan. And, in the lower left corner, the homeowner added his yellow “squirrel cage” fan.

Once the wall got half-way dry, I used my heat gun – the yellow gizmo you see lying on the dropcloth, which I call “The Great Persuader” – to speed up the drying process in stubborn areas.

Still, it took a long time for the wall to completely dry. Next I had to sand the “mud” smooth, vacuum up the dust, wipe residual dust off the wall with a damp sponge, and then apply a primer.

Start to finish, all that prep, plus hanging the paper – a whole 3.1 strips in 35 sq. ft. of space – took nearly eight hours.

Whoops! Someone Painted Over Old Wallpaper

April 21, 2021

Just looking at the walls, I had not noticed . But when I removed the light switch cover, it was clear that someone didn’t bother to remove the old wallpaper, and just painted over it.

Actually, they probably did do some prep, because you could not see seams under the paint. They must have taken steps to cover the seams.

And there was no flashing … difference in texture between paint over wallpaper, for instance, and paint over smoothing compound that was used to disguise those seams.

And there were no bubbles (caused by latex paint on top of wallpaper that absorbs moisture from the paint and swells) and only a few tiny loose areas.

Still, it would have been better if the previous guy had put some effort into removing the wallpaper, and then washing the paste off the wall and then sealing with a stain blocker, to prevent paste residue from causing the new paint to crackle and flake off the wall. Then the room would be adequately ready for paint.