Posts Tagged ‘textured’

Five-Room Re-Do – Updating the Dining Room

November 17, 2021
Originally the walls were heavily textured. See previous post for how I smoothed them. Here they are smooth, primed, and ready for wallpaper.
With it’s squiggly upward movement and bright aqua & lime color scheme, this paper adds so much life and energy to the space!
This close-up best shows the true colors.
A Street Prints is a very nice brand. These are almost always non-woven, paste-the-wall materials, but this time the instructions said to paste the paper. I usually do that anyway.

The home is in the League City suburb of Houston.

Brightening and Updating a Master Bedroom

November 15, 2021
Old, dated and dingy paper has been stripped off, walls are primed, and now ready for wallpaper.
Done. Palm leaves accent wall on the left looks out into a landscaped courtyard. The quieter paper on the right going on three walls.
Close up of the accent wall. The paper has a light sheen.
By Fine Decor. A non-woven material / paste the wall installation method (I usually prefer to paste the paper).
Bright pastel colors, and an easy-to-live with design that sort of fades into the background, giving a textured look. This is a good choice when you want the items in the room (furnishings, artwork) to take center stage, and the wallpaper simply provides a soft backdrop.
Close up.
A Street Prints, a very good brand. This is also non-woven, paste-the-wall wallpaper.

This room adjoins the master bath I blogged about on Nov. 12. Scroll down and see how beautifully the papers in all three areas coordinate, both in color and in theme.

Gradually, through my blog posts, you will see how five rooms in this home were updated and “cheered up” by the new colors and patterns.

This home is in League City, a south suburb of Houston.

Cat Claws Tear Vinyl Wallpaper

November 11, 2021

mTextured vinyl with a cushy paper backing can be too much for a cat to resist. More than a few times, I’ve seen claw marks like this.

I’m sure the cat had fun. But one 20-second session can quickly ruin a reachable section of wallpaper.

Paste Stains on Wallpaper and Woodwork

November 6, 2021
This wallpaper has been up for nearly 30 years. Over time, ” shadows ” of wallpaper paste have begun to show.
The stains are most common at the seams. During installation, it’s typical for paste to ooze out at the seams, and for the installer to wipe the paste off with a damp sponge or cloth. If he doesn’t get it all, then, over time, the paste can manifest, as you see here. There are also darker blotches to the right of the seam.
Paste caught in the lightly textured surface, and probably spread around by the installer’s wiping.
Seam opening up, probably due to humidity and / or improper wall prep.
Stains showing over a window. I don’t believe the room looked like this when the installation was completed years ago. I believe that time and humidity and other factors caused the paste to darken and show itself on the surface. I also have a hunch that clay-based paste was used. I don’t like that stuff, particularly for this reason.
One sad thing is that this room didn’t have to look like this. Note this section “before.”
Here is the same section “after.” All I did was wipe with clean water and a sponge and the stains came off easily.
Here are stains from paste that was not completely wiped off the woodwork.
Here is the same woodwork after I wiped for just a half a minute with a damp cloth.

I hate that the homeowner lived for 30 years with gradually worsening staining like this. I guess that if someone had gotten industrious, he could have taken a bucket of clean water (refreshed frequently) and a rag, and spent an afternoon washing down the walls and woodwork, and a few spots on the ceiling.

Even better would be if the original installer had ” worked clean ” – meaning, working carefully so as not to get any paste on the surface of the paper in the first place. And being more fastidious in removing any paste that did get onto the wallpaper or woodwork.

Fun Hourglass Geometric on Home Office Accent Wall

October 30, 2021
Home office wall before – textured wall was skim-floated and sanded smooth, wiped free of dust, primed, and ready for wallpaper.
Done! The homeowner wanted the “hourglass” pattern centered on where her desk would sit, rather than on the wall itself.
Close up. The silver lines are metallic raised ink, and there is a “grainy” design that gives the impression of a textured surface.
Graham & Brown is a British company that is among my favorites.

Working from home during COVID (and now for good), this homeowner wanted to enliven her workspace and get rid of endless grey walls. This fun pattern certainly did the trick!

This non-woven wallpaper was a lot more stiff and a lot less workable than most G&B papers. I used the paste-the-wall installation method for this simple accent wall, but pasting the paper would have made it more agreeable to work with.

The home is contemporary in style, and is in the Garden Oaks neighborhood of Houston.

Sanding Dust from Smoothing a Textured Wall

October 26, 2021
Bumps from textured walls look bad under wallpaper, and they interfere with good adhesion. To smooth a textured wall, I skim-float with joint compound (a plaster-like drywall material). Once it’s dry, I sand it smooth. This makes dust. In the photo above, the wall only needed a light skim-coat, so the sanding was minimal. Yet, you can see how much dust was generated. On the right is the “tent” of plastic I ran across the wall to prevent dust from getting to other parts of the room.
Here’s a closer look at the powder that has fallen to the floor. And also the sanding sponge I like. The 90 degree corners tend to be too sharp and can gouge the surface, so I take a scissors and trim that off. That’s the exposed red area you see along the edge there.

The next step is to vacuum up all this dust. Then residual powder must be wiped off the wall with a damp sponge, and you have to rinse the sponge frequently. The next step is applying a wallpaper primer. Once that’s dry, the wall is ready for wallpaper.

Soft Geometric Accent Wall in Mother In Law’s Suite

October 22, 2021
Headboard accent wall before. Textured wall was skim-floated and sanded smooth, then primed. Now it’s ready for wallpaper.
Finished.
Closer look.
Detail. The seams were invisible. The lines on this paper are raised a bit, so there is a 3-D effect.
I hung this non-woven wallpaper by the paste-the-wall method. Here I have rolled the strips backward, to prevent the decorative surface from hitting the paste on the wall. When I’m at the top of my ladder, I will take off the elastic hairband and let the paper unfurl down to the floor. It’s rolled so the top of the strip comes off first.
I have measured the wall and noted where the center point is, then determined where I want my first strip to fall. The black box in the foreground is my laser level, and you can see the vertical red line it’s shooting at the wall, which is where I am going to line up my first strip.
Positioning the wallpaper strip along the vertical laser line.
This muted geometric pattern is in the Jaclyn Smith Home line by the Trend division of Fabricut. It was mighty nice to work with, and will hold up for years until the family is ready for a change of decor. Then, the polyester-content non-woven material is designed to strip off the wall easily and in one piece.

The home is in the Memorial Villages neighborhood of Houston.

Handsome Tailored Men’s Wear Powder Room

October 21, 2021
Vanity area before.
Vanity area after.
Vanity from the front. Note the stripes perfectly centered / balanced on the wall, both above and below the sink. The wall-mounted faucet and handles, along with the stuck-to-the-wall mirror made this wall challenging. In fact, this one wall took me two and a half hours.
Stripes on the toilet alcove are also nicely balanced.
Looking up past the linen cabinet.
Close up. The wallpaper looks textured, but it’s just fooling your eye. It has the look of fabric.

This is a semi-contemporary new home in the Woodland Heights neighborhood of Houston.

The manufacturer is Wallquest, one of my preferred brands, and the pattern # is MS91603.

Traditional Swirled “Deconstructed” Damask for West Houston Powder Room

October 9, 2021
Powder room prepped, primed, and ready to hang.
Done.
Rear corner.
Rear corner done. This pattern isn’t a true damask, but it has the classic elements, so I’m calling it a deconstructed damask. It has swirls thrown into the mix.
The scratch design makes it feel antiqued and “old world.” In addition, the vinyl material has a textured surface, so it comes across something like an oil painting.
Manufacturer of this solid vinyl material is Norwall.

Rifle Paper “City Maps” – Fun Stuff

October 1, 2021
Wall smoothed and primed; ready for wallpaper. I used craft paint to color the putty-colored edge along the top of the backsplash.
Finished
Pattern centered nicely on the faucet and on the light fixture above (not shown).
The original heavy texture and lifeless khaki paint in this powder room. At the far top right, you see my smoothing compound over the door. Once this is spread over the entire wall surface, it will be allowed to dry, then sanded smooth, residual dust removed with a damp sponge, and a wallpaper-specific primer applied.
Done! So much brighter and more fun! Note the blue ceiling – a lovely touch!
View from outside the powder room.
Close up.
Rifle Paper is made by York, one of my favorite brands. Previously I’ve worked with their non-woven (synthetic fibers) wallpaper material, so I was surprised to see they also print on traditional stock like this one.

This powder room is in a newish home in the Heights neighborhood of Houston.