Posts Tagged ‘tool’

Dark and Moody Bedroom Accent Wall

August 4, 2022
The wall has been skim-floated and sanded smooth , primed , and is ready for wallpaper .
The homeowner did a great job coordinating the wall and ceiling paint with the colors in the wallpaper.
This is a room that’s made for sleeping!

At first I thought the pattern scale was too small for the large wall. But once I saw it on the wall, I really like the way it fills the space.
To me, this pattern has a sort of calico look.
Close-up shows the light texture on the paper.
This is a non-woven material, so I’m installing via the paste the wall method . Here I’ve cut and arranged all my strips in the order in which they will be hung . This is a drop match pattern , which some folks think of as A and B strips. Meaning, for instance, an orange flower appears at the top of the wall on Strip A . But the next strip, Strip B, has a yellow flower at the top. When you get to the third strip, we are back to an A and an orange flower. Next comes another B strip – and so on.
I’ve rolled the strips backward , with the top of the strip coming off first. This will prevent the printed face of the wallpaper from bumping into the pasted wall during installation .
Wallpaper often shrinks a tad when the paste dries , and this can result in very minute gaps at the seams . With dark wallpapers , it’s pretty important to take steps to prevent white from showing at these gaps. Here I’ve measured out where each seam will fall, and taken diluted black paint to make a dark stripe under each seam . I don’t make the paint full-strength, because wallpaper paste isn’t formulated to adhere to paint. I want the wallpaper adhering to the primer I’ve applied. That’s also the reason why you don’t want to roll paint over the whole wall.
Also, I have only striped some of the seam areas, and will wait until some strips are up on the wall before striping more lines. This is because wallpaper expands when it gets wet with paste, which can make it difficult to plot the exact width of each strip as you move across the wall.

I use acrylic craft paint from the hobby store, applied with a bit of sponge. I keep a small dish of water to dip the sponge into, which dilutes the paint a bit.
You also see a stick of chalk pastel . See next photo.
Besides the wall peeking out from behind the wallpaper seams , it’s also possible / probable that the white edges of the wallpaper backing / substrate will show at the seams. I take a stick of chalk and run it along the edges, making sure to apply from the backside, to avoid getting chalk onto the surface of the wallpaper.
Be sure to use chalk pastels and not oil pastels – oil will bleed and stain wallpaper. Some installers use liquid paint or markers – again, be sure to use water-based or acrylic , and never oil based or permanent markers .
BN Walls is the brand. Altogether, this was a pretty nice product to work with. It was thin and very soft and flexible (many non-wovens are not).
I wasn’t happy with all the seams, though. I believe the paper was cut with dull or wobbly wheels at the factory, because the edges seemed to not be perfectly straight . So I ended up with gaps and overlaps in some areas. Here you can see the wallpaper edges pouching up a bit due to excess paper.
But, as I mentioned, this material was quite flexible, so it was pretty easy to spread these edges apart an use a tool to push them apart and then down to prevent them from pouching up again. Once the paste started to dry, these areas held nice and tight and flat.
This is a townhome in the Rice Military neighborhood of central Houston .

Cute Toilet Protector

July 31, 2022
To protect the toilet from primer splatters, and the occasional tool that gets set on it.
I tried the fuzzy covers they make for your grandmother’s toilet lids, but they were too bulky and didn’t fit right.
Enter little kids’ T-shirts! They fit perfectly, are easy to transport with my dropcloths, come in cute colors and slogans, and, at 50c or so from Value Village (my favorite thrift shop in Houston), they can be replaced when they get too soiled.

Trimming on Rounded Corners and Bull Nose Arches

April 15, 2020

Bull-Nose Arch, Brassfield I

Bull-Nose Arch, Brassfield II

Bull-Nose Arch, Brassfield III

Bull-Nose End in Window Return

So many of the new homes have these rounded corners and bull-nosed arches. It is tricky to get a neat, even trim along those edges.

I have a special tool that helps me get a straight trim line (do a Search here to see previous posts). But still, it’s not perfect.

In the last photo, the homeowners had the builder install wooden molding inside the window return, which is a much neater way to finish the window, IMO.

Fuzzy Stuff vs. Toothbrush

September 23, 2017

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See the fuzzy stuff on the edge of this paper?  This roll by Designer Wallpapers has shards of paper left by the factory’s trimming process.  If left in place, they could cause gaps or rough looking seams.

A toothbrush has turned out to be a handy tool for scrubbing off these minute particles of paper.

A Tight Squeeze

June 15, 2016

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Look at how close this pedestal sink is to the wall on the right. There is literally only about 1/2″ of space – and I need to get wallpaper on that wall, as well as down that little narrow gap on the sink wall!

As I like to say, “If you can’t get your hand in there, then find a tool that will do the job for you.” Bottom line, I did get the two spaces covered with wallpaper.

But … next time, I just might have the homeowners remove the sink. This would make the whole job easier and faster, and it would result in a neater look. And a lot less cussing. 🙂