Posts Tagged ‘trustworth’

CFA Voysey Design in West U Guest Bathroom

November 24, 2020

Charles Voysey was a designer in the 1910’s and 1920’s, working with watercolor in the Arts & Crafts and the Art Nouveau decorative styles. His work is incredible, and I have his “Bat and Poppy” in my own powder room.

Here is his “Fairyland” in a guest bathroom in the Southside Place / West University neighborhood of Houston.

What a change!

I hung the original “chair” pattern four years ago. The thin paper material was stuck good and tight, and my attempts to strip it off were taking excessive time and also causing damage to the underlying surface. So I opted to prep and seal the paper and hang the new pattern on top of it.

The original pattern was fun. But this new choice suits the room much better, and it looks brighter, too. And the colorway works perfectly with the muddy blue cabinetry and mirror.

This is a non-woven material, a little thicker and stiffer than I like, and a tad prone to creasing. But with careful handling, it went up very nicely. I did the paste-the-wall method. The seams were invisible.

My powder room Bat & Poppy is a paper, and was purchased from Trustworth Studios. It had to be hand trimmed, and was on the higher end of the price scale.

Today’s Fairyland pattern is made by Lord & Twig. L & T is recreating the same Voysey designs as Trustworth, but in a more consumer-friendly material and price.

You can buy this through Finest Wallpaper, a newish outfit in Canada that sells a vast array of brands and patterns (in addition to manufacturing it’s own Lord & Twig line). Their prices are good, turn-around is quick, and customer service is exceptional.

Bat & Poppy Wallpaper Finally Goes Up

November 9, 2015

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I saw this “Bat and Poppy” wallpaper and went positively nuts over it. It is made by Trustworth Studios http://trustworth.com/ and are based on designs by CFA Voysey dating back to the Art Nouveau period (early late 1800’s) and particularly the Arts & Crafts period in England (early 1900’s).

All the patterns are unique and gorgeous, and the paper is a positive dream to work with – pattern matches nicely, malleable, seams invisible. It’s only sold on-line, and the company is wonderfully customer-friendly. The paper is pricy, but if you love it, you will be satisfied with nothing else.

This is the powder room in my own home. The vanity is an antique music cabinet that I cut a hole in the top and removed some of the shelves inside to accommodate the plumbing. The sink is an old china / porcelain serving bowl that I had a hole drilled in by Schlitzberger Stone, and then paid a plumber positively a ton to get the right fittings to connect it to the drain pipe.

“Whoot” Owls by Trustworth in a’30’s Heights Bungalow

October 2, 2015

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English designer CFA Voysey created wallpaper during the Arts & Crafts period of the 1920’s – 1930’s. Trustworth Studios produces renditions of his patterns that are historicaly accurate, yet suited for the modern American home. This owl-themed pattern is called “Whoot.”

I hung this in a 1930’s bungalow home in a historical district in the Houston neighborhood called the Heights. The homeowner loved it so much, and had such limited space, that she put it in her one unclaimed area – the bedroom hallway. Note the niche for the telephone. Back in those days, homes had ONE telephone (if they were lucky and had the means), and it was in an area accessable to all family members – which meant that there was little privacy while one was talking on the phone.

The paper has to be hand-pasted, and also hand-trimmed to remove the selvedge, which you see happening in the 2nd to last photo.

The ceilings in this room (as well as many / most of the physical elements) were very un-level and un-flat. So I knew I couldn’t plan to have a certain element (like the owl’s head) appear at the ceiling line, because I knew that the changing ceiling line would distort the pattern as it moved horizontally across the room. This also allowed me to plot the baby owls’ settings.

So, instead, I dropped the owls’ heads down to fall below the ceiling line. That way, no owls’ heads get cut off, and, if the ceiling line line moves up and down a little (It DOES!), no one will notice the difference between a half an orange flower at the top of the wall, and a three-quarters of an orange flower in the same. And both the owls and their babies in the nests are perfectly centered, vertically, over the doors.

Too technical?? Here it is, revised.
I also measured and plotted so that the adult owls, and the baby owls in their nests, would be centered vertically in the two short drops above the doors.

This wallpaper is by Trustworth Studios, and is printed to order. It comes with selvedge-edge, which has to be trimmed of by hand (see photo), making sure that the pattern will match one strip to the next.

I love working with Trustworth papers. The product is positively a dream to work with. It trims nicely, seams are invisible, it’s malleable enough to “moosh” it into place when needed, there is no staining, paste residue wipes off, theren’s no abrading or bleeding, although pricy, it’s customer-friendly and easy to purchase (no store or designer needed), and such beautiful patterns!

Period-Authentic Pattern in a Powder Room

June 16, 2015

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When I first visited with this homeowner, she showed me some wallpaper patterns she was considering. I looked at the style of her home, the antique furniture she had, her affinity for things old, and her “sweet” sentimentality toward decorating, and suggested she look at the designs offered by Trustworth Studios. http://trustworth.com/wallpaper.shtml

She and I were both thrilled when she took my advice. This beautiful wallpaper pattern is by Trustworth Studios, who specializes in recreating authentic designs by turn-of-the-century artists, including C.F.A. Voysey. This one is called “The Brambley.” (I have their “Bat and Poppy” pattern in my own powder room … do a Search here to find photos.)

Usually, I plan to have a certain element of the pattern hit the top of the wall at the ceiling line. What ends up at the bottom of the wall is not too important, because, really – who’s looking at the wallpaper at the floor?! But this room had a chair rail mid-way down the wall, so the bottom of the strip would be very visible. In the top photo, you see how I have placed a certain motif at the top of the wall. And, in the second photo, you see how I plotted it so that a whole element of the pattern lands at the bottom of the wall (which is the top of the chair rail, and fairly near eye-level). In this way, whole elements of the pattern appear at the top of the wall, and at eye-level, for a pleasing effect, and nothing gets chopped in half.

Note: Not all wall heights and pattern repeats work out this nicely, but when they do, it makes for a nicer effect.

In the third photo, you see the true color of the paper. (I have no idea why the first pictures show the paper as grey – it is not – it is blue, as C.F.A. Voysey originally created it.) You also see the selvedge edge, like you have in fabric when sewing clothing. This has to be trimmed off by hand, carefully and with special equipment, and a lot of time and patience.

Their papers take a little more work, but I absolutely love working with them. The trim marks are true, the paper trims nicely, the paper manipulates into place much better than most, the paper does not shrink (no gapping at the seams), the seams are invisible, it works with standard wallpaper pastes, and, if need be (I did not need to) paste can be washed off the surface with no problems.

The last photo is my ending point. In this powder room, in a new Oak Forest home, there was no “hidden” corner, so a mis-matched pattern in any corner would have been very visible. But the space over the door was only about a foot high, it was 10′ up, and decorative molding stuck out from the wall, pretty much hiding that area. So I kept the pattern true in all four corners, and put the ending point – which always ends in a mis-match – over the door, using a little creative scissors work to disguise the mis-match. It looks darned good, if I do say so myself. 🙂