Posts Tagged ‘tv’

Grasscloth in Tiny Bookshelf Cubicles

February 3, 2018

This neutral-hued grasscloth sure warms up the look of these display shelves, adding both soft color and texture. The homeowner’s books and decorative items stand out much better.

None of the shelves was removable, so I had to cut and install TWENTY FIVE separate pieces of grasscloth wallpaper for the backs of these bookshelves.

To minimize trimming inside those small, tight cubicles, I took careful measurements and then pre-cut my pieces. I used a straight edge, razor blade, and one of those “self-healing” cutting mats that are used for sewing and crafts. The mat was marked both vertically and horizontally in inches (and graduations) and had easy to see right angles.

I cut all my pieces a mere 1/2″ larger than the dimensions of each cubicle. I used the craft mat and straight edge to cut a right angle in the upper left corner of each piece of grasscloth. I could position this in the upper left corner of each cubicle, which also butted it up perfectly against the top and left sides of the cubicle.

Then all I had to do was use my razor knife to trim the grasscloth on the right and bottom sides, to fit into the cubicle.

I spent a full four hours priming, then measuring and labeling each cubicle, and then cutting and pre-trimming each of the 25 pieces of grasscloth. Look at the photo of my measurements!

All this effort paid off, because every single piece of material went into its cubbyhole perfectly, and required trimming on just two sides (instead of four). The install still took a full eight hours. But it was fun and challenging, and a different work-out for the brain from hanging paper on tall, flat walls.

This grasscloth wallpaper is by Thibaut. I forgot to take a photo of the label, but it was a really nice paper, and, even though I had only one seam (in the TV niche), for once there was no issue with shading or color differences – in fact, that one seam is all but invisible. I hung this in a living room in a townhouse in the Rice Military / Camp Logan neighborhood of Houston.

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Circles, Spots, and Dots

November 30, 2016
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These owners of a newish townhouse in the Montrose neighborhood of Houston wanted an accent wall covered with something to bring personality to their third floor TV room, without adding too much distracting color or pattern, and without overwhelming the large flat screen TV. After looking at maybe a zillion choices, they came back to one of their first loves, this fun ball design.

The builder had not textured the wall, so all the only prep that was needed was a primer. I centered the balls in the middle of the wall so they would look even around the TV set. I used plastic strips to keep paste off the ceiling and the walls that were not being papered.

This wallpaper I by Wallquest, and is in their Ecochic line. It is a thin paper (not a vinyl) and will hold up nicely.

Water-Colorful and Fun Flowers on a Bedroom Accent Wall

November 17, 2016
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It was hard getting a full-wall shot of this wallpaper install, because the wall was so darned tall – nearly 12 feet high! But you get the idea.

Originally, the wall was painted navy blue, like the other three walls in this master bedroom. The wall also had a flat-screen TV plastered in the middle of it. The husband, of course, loved the huge TV. But the wife persevered, and got him to agree to have this colorful and playful wallpaper cover the wall. Now, as to whether or not that TV will go back up on the wall remains to be seen ….

I smoothed the textured wall, which you can see on the right side of the first photo. The next day I hung the paper. The paper is by York, in the SureStrip line. It is a pre-pasted product, on a thin non-woven backing, and is designed to strip off the wall (relatively) easily when you want to redecorate. It is a lovely product to work with, clings tightly to the wall, seams are nearly invisible, and should hold up nicely for many years.

This is a 1955 home with mid-century modern flare, in the Spring Branch neighborhood of Houston, and the clients were a busy family with school-age children.

Wild Teal Leaf Pattern

September 23, 2016
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Teal is a popular color right now. This homeowner went back and forth on a few options for this accent wall in her living room in an older bungalow in the Woodland Heights (Houston). I love her final decision – and she did, too!

In the first photo, I have rolled the wallpaper out on the floor, to find the pattern match and to see how the overall pattern plays out across a large space.

This pattern is by Hygge & West, an on-line company. It adds a bold block of color to the living room, but, since there is not a lot of contrast, the pattern does not come across as busy. There is a flat screen TV that will be mounted on the wall, and the dark color of the wallpaper will help the TV “disappear.”

Balancing Act on a TV Wall

July 31, 2016
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Here is a fireplace / TV wall in a great room in a newish home in the Galleria area of Houston. (The flat screen TV has been removed, leaving the bracket, which I have wrapped in plastic to protect it from dust and paste.) Yesterday I smoothed the walls; today I am ready to hang the paper, this beautiful silvery metallic damask by Graham & Brown.

This wall presents an interesting challenge, because it is divided into three distinct areas – the recessed center area where the TV hangs, and the two flanking full-height areas. The main damask figure is large and prominent, and I wanted it to be a focal point on the walls. But, depending on where I started, some of it would get cut off, in particular at either side of the full-height walls.

If I centered the pattern in the TV alcove, then by the time it wrapped its way around the alcove walls and onto the two side walls, it would be off-center, and some part of it would be cut in half when it reached the far wall.

But if I centered it on one of the full-height walls, by the time it wound its way into and around the TV alcove, and then around and onto the next full-height wall, the pattern would be all off kilter.

What I wanted to do was to center the pattern on EACH of those three walls. But that would be impossible… Unless – I treated each wall as an independent wall, and not worry about matching the pattern from wall to alcove to wall. I liked this idea, and it was the perfect wall to do it with, because the inner corner of the TV alcove is pretty hidden, and you really wouldn’t notice a pattern mis-match way back in there.

So, I got the go-ahead from the homeowner to mis-match the pattern in those two corners, and then went to work plotting the layout.

Treating each wall separately, I rejected my first idea, which was to center the damask pattern down the middle of each full-height wall, because it would mean cutting the design off at about 1/3 on the far side of each wall. This also would have left me with a narrow strip of paper wrapping around the bull-nosed rounded corner on the outside of the TV alcove, which would be prone to warping and gapping and not adhering well.

Instead, by placing it where I did (see photos), I was able to get four of the motifs horizontally on the wall, with only a negligible amount cut off on the far side. It also gave me a nice-sized strip to wrap around into the inner sides of the TV alcove, which would give a good edge for the next strip to butt up against.

I treated the back wall of the TV alcove as a separate wall, not trying to match the pattern to the design that was on the wrapped walls of the alcove. By centering the motif, I was able to get three full horizontal repeats of the design, with nothing cut off at the right or left side.

From a distance, the overall look is quite pleasing. And you definitely do not notice that the pattern does not match inside those deep corners inside the TV alcove. Once the TV is back in place and the football game is on, no one will ever think twice about any wallpaper pattern mis-match.

The homeowner said she is really in to symmetry and balance, and she did notice how I had plotted all this out, and it pleased her, and she appreciated the time and effort.

This wallpaper is by Graham & Brown, has a metallic sheen, and was a paper rather than the non-woven stock they print on a lot these days. This paper was nice to work with. It was bought on-line.

Soft Faux Grasscloth for Backdrop in Family Room and Family Photo Wall

April 2, 2016
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Happily, the owners of this new home in the Houston Heights listened to my lecture about variations of color in natural grasscloth, and instead chose this paper knock-off.

The paper does not have texture, but it looks like it does, and the whole wall dissolves into a muted, serene, almost tactual backdrop for the large flat-screen TV that will cover most of the wall. On the other wall, the paper will be a background for family photos.

The wallpaper had a pattern match, but, interestingly, the match was off a bit, matching at the top of the strip, then 6″ down it would not line up, but 6″ further down, the pattern match was spot-on. When there is a pattern match, you hang strips next to each other, so the pattern on one strip can be lined up with the pattern on the next strip.

But when I hung this material as instructed, there was color paneling. Meaning, a noticeable difference in color between one strip and the one right next to it. This is pretty common in natural materials like real grasscloth, but I didn’t expect it with this manufactured product.

Yet, there it was – and the solution was fairly simple. I reversed every other strip, hanging one right-side-up and the next strip upside-down. That way, the edge of each strip of wallpaper is placed next to itself, which pretty much eliminates color variations.

This wallpaper pattern is by Thibaut Designs, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Dark Chocolate Grasscloth on a Fireplace / TV Wall

September 17, 2015
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This couple with two young children in a new home in the Houston Heights wanted to add some color and texture to their nearly-all-white house, tie in to the dark brown wood floor, as well as minimize the impact of the large TV over the fireplace in the great room. This darker-than-chocolate brown grasscloth checked off all those points!

In the first shot, I have plotted where my pieces will lie and where the seams will fall, so the widths of strips will be uniform. I have striped the wall with dark brown paint, to prevent any white primer from peaking out in case the seams on this dark textured material do not butt up perfectly.

Also, because the paper is so dark, and because the primer is white, dark chalk was called for, to color the edges, to keep the white paper backing from peaking out.

I was very pleased with this product, as there was none of the color variation (shading / paneling) that is common with many grasscloth jobs. As the grasscloth progresses across the wall, you can see the seams because the strands of grass do not match, but you don’t see any color differences. This is how grasscloth SHOULD be.

This is a new home, and has the rounded / bull-nosed corners that have been popular for several years now. It is very hard to get a stiff grass product to bend and wrap around these corners. In one photo, you see how I have taken the grasscloth before it was pasted, and worked it in the area where it will hit the corner, to bend / break the grass fibers, hoping to get it to wrap around that rounded turn tightly and neatly. Once it gets wet with paste, it will become more pliable. You also see a pic of a metal plate tool (invented by a paperhanger colleague in Canada), that I used to “encourage” the material to wrap around the corner. I can put a lot of force behind this tool, without worry of burnishing or damaging the wallpaper.

In the end, the grasscloth wrapped nicely around the rounded corners and no white wall showed. And the TV, which previously stood out like a sore thumb against the builder’s white painted wall, is much less conspicuous against the dark wall. The whole room benefited from the warm color and texture of this grasscloth.

This grasscloth is made by Seabrook, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.