Posts Tagged ‘victoria’

Recent Magazines With Wallpaper

December 18, 2019


December 2019 issues of:

Victoria –

First two photos, bold color and classic jardiniere in a very traditional dining room setting.

Southern Living –

3rd photo. Mural on dining room walls. I believe this is the Etched Arcadia pattern that I have hung (and loved) several times. (Do a Search here to see previous posts with this pattern.)

4th photo. A “man cave” done with dark wall treatment and a lighter, tight textured pattern on the ceiling.

5th photo. Large honeycomb wooden lattice on ceiling, small print on walls. The wallpaper is by Iksel, a high-end British company, and one that I visited when the Wallcovering Installers Association took a Tech Trip to England in 2017 (do a Search here). This paper is expensive and the design is well-suited to the room. Yet the pattern is, well, nothing really special about it. If someone were looking to recreate this look on a budget, it would be very possible to find something similar at a more pocketbook-friendly price.

6th photo. Boy’s room, showing interesting use of color between walls and wood.

7th photo. More adventurous use of color, on ceiling and walls. The paper is by Quadrille, which is notorious for being difficult to hang. (Do a Search here to read my experiences and comments.) Again – for every cool pattern by a high-fallutin’ designer brand that hasn’t researched how to make compatible inks and substrates and good quality paper, there are other main-stream companies making similar designs, that will perform better and hit your wallet more easily.

Gracie Wallpaper Mural in Victoria Magazine

April 8, 2018


Sorry, this is a really, really bad picture, I know. It’s a shot of a page in the Spring 2018 issue of Victoria magazine.

But what’s cool is that it shows a really fabulous hand-painted, custom-made, probably silk wallpaper mural, in an equally fabulous and beautifully furnished home full of antiques.

The mural is by Gracie, and took a year to produce. The room has to be measured meticulously, with notes made where very door, window, bump-out, and other elements of the room are located. Then the silk is hand-painted in panels, which are then shipped to the home and reassembled sequentially as they fit around the room. Installation is tedious and exacting, and requires special liners, pastes, techniques, and sometimes even gloves, to prevent hands from touching the delicate paper and inks.