Posts Tagged ‘wall’

Avoid Damaging the New Wallpaper – Have All Work Done BEFORE the Paper Goes Up

October 8, 2020


See those dark smudges and scrapes on the wall, on both sides of the corner? The homeowner had crown molding installed, and this resulted in damage to the walls.

Either scraping while manipulating the wood into place, or the carpenter letting his sweaty hands touch the walls, or maybe leaning against the wall with his keychain rubbing on it.

So, best to have work like this done before the new wallpaper goes up.

Fiberglass Fibers in Non-Woven Wallpaper

June 11, 2020


I have just measured and torn a strip of wallpaper off the bolt. See those fuzzy whiskers at the torn edge?

This paper is made of non woven. I’m told that it has a high fiberglass content. And what you’re seeing in the photos is strands of that fiberglass.

Why put fiberglass in wallpaper? There are many advantages to the non-woven wallpapers.

The fiberglass strengthens them. Among other benefits, this makes it possible to pull intact strips off the wall when it’s time to redecorate.

Because there is no traditional paper content (cotton, wood pulp), the material is dimensionally-stable. This means that it won’t expand when it becomes wet with paste. This means that your measurements will be accurate. And that there is no booking time – so you can paste a sheet and put it on the wall immediately. It’s rare to worry about a non-woven shrinking or gapping at the seams as it dries.

Disguising a Bowed Wall

June 6, 2020


The right edge of this wallpaper was plotted to butt up against the outside corner of this wall. Only problem is – the wall was curved or bowed or whatever you want to call it – either way, it ended up with a sliver not covered by the wallpaper.

This was a mural, where each panel has its own individual design … so there was no piece of excess paper with a repetitive pattern to match up a patch.

No biggie … It’s a busy enough pattern and a non-prominent location (read: near the floor, behind a piece of furniture), so that a minor patter mis-match would not be noticed.

I took the scrap of paper that I had trimmed off at the baseboard and then used a straightedge and razor blade to cut a wedge-shaped piece that I used to fill in the narrow area.

VoilĂ !

Crooked Wall

June 3, 2020


A crooked / bowed wall like this makes it difficult to match the wallpaper pattern perfectly.

Bibliotheque Install Details, Pt III – Curling Edges

March 18, 2020

As mentioned in a previous post about this install, wallpaper paste introduces moisture to the back of the paper, which causes the backing to absorb moisture and expand – and, sometimes, as in this case, the expansion will cause the paper to curl back on itself.

As you can imagine, this makes it a whole lot harder to get the strip positioned and secured to the wall.

Bibliotheque Install Details – Pt V, Corner Pattern Detail

March 18, 2020


For reasons too complicated to get into here, the left vertical edge of the “column” in this corner ended up not being as wide as those of other “columns” in the room.

My solution was to take some scrap wallpaper and hand-trim a 3/8″ wide x 6′ high strip of the appropriate pattern match.

I could applique this onto the left side of the wall – but that would eat up some of the right edges of the books.

I decided that it would be less noticeable to place that strip right in the corner. This means that it would eat up a bit of the width of the “column.”

But the eye would not notice that much.

What the eye would see is the 3/8″ wide vertical white stripe along the left edge (see last photo), nicely in sync with the columns in the other areas of the room.

Smoothing a Heavily Textured Wall

February 9, 2020


The first photo shows the typical heavy texture that is put on many tract homes in the suburbs around Houston. You can’t hang wallpaper on these walls – it will look bad, and it will not adhere well.

The second photo shows how I have used a trowel to apply smoothing compound (drywall joint compound – I use the lightweight version, because it sands more easily).

Because the texture was so very thick, this had to dry overnight.

In the third photo, I have sanded the walls smooth, and applied a penetrating primer called Gardz.

Gardz works nicely as a wallpaper primer, too, so, once it is dry, I will be ready to hang wallpaper.

Hiding an Unused Opening in the Wall

December 29, 2019


Beneath this light switch is an equal-sized hole cut in the wall, with cable wires running behind it, intended probably for a sound or alarm system. The homeowners were not using it, and it had a blank wall plate over it.

Instead of having a white plate of plastic that was not serving any purpose visually clog up the wall, I removed the plate and just let the wallpaper cover the opening.

Right now, you can see a little warped area where the paper is spanning the void. But as the paper dries, it should pull taught and disguise the opening nicely. The mottley color of the wallpaper will further help to obscure the area.

Using the Laser Level

December 11, 2019


Here I am using my laser level to line up my first wallpaper strip, making sure it’s nice and straight and plumb, while also centering it on the spot where the headboard will sit against the wall.

Problem With Wall – Unstable Paint

October 22, 2019


Here’s where a little bit of paint has peeled away from the wall. Why? Most likely because over the 60 year lifetime of this house, various products have been applied to the walls.

Oil based paint, followed by latex paint, then gloss paint, maybe some smoothing compound, then more paint and then another coat of paint.

In all probability, improper prep, or, more likely, no prep at all, was done between all these surface treatments.

The thing is, all of these disparate materials are not likely to stick to one another, especially if no prep has been done.

The problem becomes, then, that when a new surface treatment (paint, wallpaper) is applied, and then dries, which results in shrinking, which results in pulling taught and putting stress on the wall’s surface, the stress can cause these various surfaces to actually pull apart (delaminate).

That’s what you’re seeing here.