Posts Tagged ‘woodwork’

Dining Room Is Brightened and Warmed at the Same Time

September 11, 2021
Before. Walls are primed and ready for paper.
After
The homeowner raved about how the wallpaper made the room look so much brighter. And it coordinates so nicely with the color of the woodwork and wainscoting.
Detail. There is a slight raised-ink feel.
Using my laser level to get the first strip plumb, and the motifs centered vertically between the windows.
The pattern name “Kashmira” reflects the slight ethnic feel of this pattern. The manufacturer is Baker Lifestyle, in their Echo Collection.

Here’s a dining room in the Woodland Heights neighborhood of Houston that feels both cheerful and snug at the same time.

The material was “non-woven” and could be hung using the paste-the-wall method. However, I prefer the flexibility and accuracy that comes with pasting the paper.

The interior designer is Stacie Cokinos of Cokinos Design, who works mostly in the Heights area of Houston.

Subtle Schumacher Stripe for “Big Girl’s Room”

August 22, 2021

With all four walls, plus the woodwork, painted pink, one accent wall in a simple stripe on a subtle background adds just the right touch of contrast. And the perfect backdrop for the bed, dresser, and hutch.

The furniture is in the French Provincial style. It was the mother’s childhood furniture, so it is a treasure being passed on to her daughter, who is moving up to her “big girl’s room.”

The wallpaper manufacturer is Schumacher. This is a traditional print on a traditional substrate, so it went up without the hassles I usually expect from this brand.

Serena & Lily “Priano” in West Houston Dining Room

April 24, 2021
Textured walls have been smoothed, primed, and are ready for wallpaper.
Beautiful, soft, nature-infused look.
Close-up.

This is a soft, but very spritely look, for a large dining room in a Memorial-area home in west Houston.

I love the way the previously-invisible woodwork now stands out.

The manufacturer is Serena & Lily, and their “Priano” is one of my favorite patterns. Their wallpapers are very nice to work with.

Mottley Gold Damask in River Oaks Dining Room

January 27, 2021

The lady of the house likes glitter and bling, but didn’t want to over do it in the dining room. She also didn’t want anything too rigid or precise.

This rather scratchy, indistinct damask by York works perfectly. There’s a bit of glitter, but not overwhelming, plus a light texture that adds a pleasing effect.

This is a non-woven material, and so could be hung using the paste-the-wall method, which works nicely for an accent / feature wall like this.

In the last photo, you see me measuring off the strips, rolling them backwards (to prevent the surface from bopping into the pasted wall), and lining them up in the order they will be hung on the wall. Because I pasted the wall, there was no need for me to haul in my big work / pasting table. The PTW method is also very clean, because pastes goes on the wall only, so no messy wet scraps and no need to wipe paste off the woodwork.

Working in a 19th Century Historic Home

December 18, 2020

I don’t normally show pictures of my clients’ personal spaces, but this is a documented historic home, and already well-known to the public. The homeowners were eager to share with me the history of the home as well as its inhabitants.

I am proud to be working in this well-preserved structure. It was built in 1883 and is still mostly authentic, retaining original woodwork, flooring, hardware (door knobs, hinges, transom mechanisms, doorbell), and many other elements.

The home is located in the Old Sixth Ward of central Houston. The whole neighborhood is designated a Historic District. This means that there are protections ensuring the preservation of buildings there, as well as preventing out-of-sync new construction.

I highly approve!

Farrow & Ball Lotus in River Oaks Master Bedroom

September 12, 2020


“Lotus” is a very old and very popular pattern by the British paint and wallpaper company Farrow & Ball.

It comes in several colors, but for all four walls in a large bedroom in the River Oaks neighborhood of Houston, the homeowner wisely chose this muted light tan-on-white.

It coordinates beautifully with the newly lightened and refinished floors, and the woodwork.

The material has an interesting gesso-like texture, which you can see in the last photo. It kind of makes the walls look like an artist’s painting.

Cure Time – Paint Woodwork LONG BEFORE the Paper Goes Up

May 17, 2018


Why am I posting a picture of a can of trim paint? Because I found this in the room where I am to hang wallpaper today, along with a portable cup of wet paint and some brushes. This tells me that the homeowners were in the room last night, frantically painting all the woodwork in a large room with lots of framed openings and two walls of windows – LOTS of trim to paint.

Folks, this is not good. Woodwork should be painted carefully and slowly. First, the existing paint needs to be sanded or deglossed, and then wiped clean. I like to apply a coat of primer. Then the new paint can go up – but it should be brushed on carefully, paying attention to the direction of brush strokes and eliminating runs and drips.

But most important is that the paint needs time to dry. Not just to dry, but to cure. This can take several days.

This is important, because when I come along and put up the wallpaper, paste will get onto the woodwork. This is normal. No biggie. You just wiped it off with a damp rag.

But if the woodwork was not prepped properly, or if the paint has not had a chance to cure, it’s possible – probable – that the paint is not sticking tightly to the surface, and that wiping the paste off the woodwork will also take some of the paint along with it.

Best to plan ahead, read up on proper prep and materials, allow enough time to apply the paint properly, and then allow adequate dry / cure time.

Crusty, Flaky Stuff on Woodwork

March 2, 2018


You’re looking at a section of crown molding. See that flakey stuff? That is the enamel paint on cracking and chipping off the woodwork. Why? When the original wallpaper was installed, some paste got on the crown molding. This is normal.

But in this case, the paperhanger didn’t wipe off all the residue (this can be hard to do, because it’s really hard to see). Over time, that paste residue ate into the paint and caused it to crackle and chip off the wood.

This can be avoided by making sure that all paste residue is completely wiped off any painted surfaces. I like to use a thin blue plastic tape on the top edge of wallpaper, which keeps paste from coming in contact with the crown molding or ceiling.

Stripping Off Old Wallpaper

February 14, 2018


This hall bathroom in a 1955 ranch-style home in the Briargrove / Tanglewood neighborhood of Houston was damaged by a roof leak during Hurricane Harvey. The contractor’s guys did a good job replacing drywall and painting the woodwork, but they fell short when it came to wallpaper. See first photo.

But this just gave the homeowner a chance to choose something that coordinated better with the decades-old tile that she loves (and that I love, too), and to pick a paper with more color and flair, that is more suited to her taste. See tomorrow’s post for that.

My first task was to remove the existing wallpaper. It turned out that there were two layers of paper, and, in some places, THREE layers.

In the second photo, I have removed most of the top (new) paper, which is the aqua trellis by Thibaut. I took it off by simply tearing it off the wall. Below it, you see the green savoy (small, tight, squiggly) by Waverly. Interestingly enough, I have hung this a bunch of times – in the ’90’s. 🙂

This paper was attached more tightly to the wall. To remove it, I had to first separate the top inked layer from it’s paper backing. You can see this in the second photo. Once the top layer, with it’s water-resistant acrylic surface was removed, it left behind a white paper backing. I used a sponge and bucket of hot water to soak the backing. It didn’t take long before the underlying paste reactivated, and then it was ready to let go of the wallpaper. You can see clean wall revealed in the photo, where the layers of wallpaper have come away.

In one area of the room, I got a surprise. There was a third layer of paper under the others. The top vinyl layer had been stripped of eons ago, but the tan, gritty paper backing was left on the wall. You can see this in the third photo dry (light tan) and soaked with water (dark tan). Once that tan paper backing got soaked enough with several spongings with hot water, the paste reactivated and the paper was happy to come away from the wall.

I was uncommonly lucky today, because whoever hung the original wallpaper had taken the time to prep the walls correctly. First, he skim-coated the textured walls to yield a smooth surface for the paper to adhere to. Second, he applied good quality penetrating sealer. This sealer might have been Gardz, a product that I use now, or another similar sealer, perhaps even a solvent-based (as opposed to water-based) sealer. His sealer provided a hard surface for the new paper to stick to, and also gave a surface that was resistant to all the water I was using to strip off the old wallpaper.

Check out the fourth picture to see the huge pile of wallpaper I pulled off this one small hall bathroom.

Once all the paper was off, the walls were in very good condition. There were no delaminated areas, no lifted areas, nothing that needed patching – just an amazingly intact surface.

I did a few little touch-ups to a few little areas (I wanted to clean up 60 years of grime collected along the top of the tile), and then rolled on my favorite wallpaper primer, by Roman’s, their Pro 977 / Ultra Prime. It’s a white pigmented primer, and is a wonderful surface to hang wallpaper on.

Hick’s Hexagon in a Houston Heights Powder Room

January 28, 2018


This large powder room (it has a shower!) in a new home in the Houston Heights originally had all-white walls (like the rest of the house). Interior designer Stacie Cokinos suggested wallpaper to warm the room and add personality. The homeowner had never used wallpaper before and was skeptical, but she tentatively agreed.

What a wonderful choice this turned out to be! The wallpaper defines the space and transforms it from timid to bold. But, because the color palette is limited, the feeling is not chaotic. The color coordinates beautifully with the dark brass wall sconces. Previously, the white woodwork blended in with the white walls. But now the dark color of the wallpaper makes the beautiful door moldings stand out.

This is a popular pattern, and I’ve hung it, or variations of it, a number of times. The design is by David Hicks and is made by Cole & Son, a British company. It’s a non-woven material, and is meant to be applied by the paste-the-wall method, but I had better results with pasting the paper.

The interior designer is Stacie Cokinos, of Cokinos Design. She works primarily on new builds, and mostly in the Heights neighborhoods. Her look is spacious, clean, and crisp, with a little fun tossed into the mix.