Hold On To Your Head! – Wallpaper Pattern Placement

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Digital Image

Digital Image

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Digital Image

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The ceiling height in this room vaulted from 8′ on the north and south walls, to 9′ on the east and west walls. In most rooms, I like to place an important design element at the top of the wall. And I like to keep design motifs intact when I can, meaning, to keep whole flamingo heads at the top of the wall. But with a pattern like this, that moves diagonally up and down the wall, there’s always going to be someone who gets his head chopped off.

I felt it important to keep whole, intact flamingo heads at the top of the main focal wall. But the two adjoin walls were visually important to the room, too, and I didn’t want to have half-heads at the top of either of these two walls. So I took some time and plotted how to keep the most heads of flamingos at the most prominent points of the room for most of the time.

In the top photo, on the right, you see the highest point of the wall in this room. From this high point, I used my laser level to drop a plumb, vertical line from the ceiling to the floor (not shown). To the left of this, you see the wall angling down to meet with the lower-height wall to its left. I took a level and used it to draw a horizontal line from where the lower-height wall / crown molding started on the left, to where this line crossed onto the beamed vertical line shot from my laser level onto adjoining wall to its right.

Then I ran a level from the crown molding you see in the second photo then horizontally all the way across the 21″ width of a strip of the wallpaper, and then also across 21″ of it’s adjoining strip. This showed me where all the flamingo heads would fall on the wall, across two strips of wallpaper.

Along this vertical line, the distance between the ceiling crown molding and the horizontal line from the crown molding on the lower-height wall was 11.5″ (with a little allowance for un-level crown molding). I wanted to avoid chopping off any flamingo heads at the level point of either the 9′ high crown molding, or at level laser point of the horizontal line running 11.5″ below the crown molding.

To determine where the flamingo heads on the wallpaper would translate onto where they would actually fall on the wall, I rolled some of the paper out on my table, and considered options of which ostrich to place at the top of the wall. I played around, slid strips up and down, and eventually found the point where the most flamngos would have their whole heads at the top of the main focal wall, and also at the top of the shorter walls on either side.

The flamingo heads on both the sitting and the standing birds on the sections over the door on adjoining 8′ walls fell a little further down below the crown molding than I would have liked (see 3rd photo), but they still looked great, they kept their heads attached to their bodies, plus they were balanced nicely between the crown molding and the top of the door frame.

All this took much plotting, measuring, calculating, and time, and it’s not something that a homeowner is going to even notice. But I was really happy that I could give this couple (and the little boy whose room this will be) a nicely-placed, well-balanced pattern, with as few cut-off heads as possible.

This wallpaper pattern is called “Flamingo,” and is by Cole & Son, a British manufacturer, and was bought at below retail price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. She is great at helping you find just the perfect paper! Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

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