Another Example of Paneling in Grasscloth

July 2, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

This finely textured grasscloth is by Phillip Jeffries, a fairly high-end brand. All the bolts were the same run number. Yet, as you can see, there is a noticeable color difference between strips. This is called paneling. Here – short strips, under and above the windows, somewhat obscured by drapes – it’s not too noticeable. But imagine if you had 9′ strips next to each other on a wide wall, with this color difference.

This is not considered a defect (and the manufacturer will not replace the wallpaper). This is normal, and it’s considered part of the “inherent beauty of the natural product.”

Old World Pattern in a Brand New House

July 1, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

This weathered and worn-looking pattern is the perfect fit for a powder room in a brand new home in Bellaire (Houston), that has many old-world features, such as stone floors, carved stone fireplaces, wide distressed dark wood flooring, iron grillwork, cathedral vaulted ceilings, lantern style light fixtures, and more. An ornate, antique mirror will hang over the sink. (I hope they send me a photo!!)

The color in the second photo got washed out, but you can see how the color and timeworn finish on the door compliment the wallpaper superbly. The paper has a little bit of glitter, and a little bit of texture, which add a nice element of glitzy-but-shabby (in a shabby chic sort of way).

This wallpaper pattern is called Audrey and is by Fabricut.

Don’t Try This at Home – And Please Don’t Call OSHA!

June 30, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

Sometimes you have to get a little creative when your reach won’t reach.

The ceilings were 11′ high, I’m 5’3″ standing on the 5th step of a 6′ ladder – I just couldn’t reach that far corner over the vanity! A 5-gallon bucket on top of a Rubbermaid step stool, on top of non-slip shelf liner protecting the marble vanity top, with most of my weight on the ladder and just a toe hold on the bucket for balance, I was able to reach the top of the wall to trim the paper and smooth it into place.

Just please don’t call the man from OSHA! :)

Happily All A-Twitter in a Powder Room

June 28, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Here’s a cheery pattern for a powder room! This wallpaper is by Schumacher, and is called “A Twitter.” This is the second home I’ve hung it in.

Typical of wrapping and shipping, there was a smudge near the top of one roll, from packaging. And typical of Schumacher these days, there were a number of specks of ink stuck into the paper. Most were small enough to be insignificant, but some caused me to throw away some yardage of paper.

The walls in this room were very crooked and bowed, and I had to pull some tricks out of my hat to keep the pattern looking matched and straight.

The interior designer for this job in River Oaks (Houston) is Elizabeth Mann of Hattaras Interiors. Please e-mail me if you would like her contact information.

Hangin’ On Island Time

June 27, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

to minimize and obscure the mismatch .

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Today I was working in a new home in Pirate’s Cove on Galveston Island. Just look at that gorgeous view out the window!

Inside, in the powder room, though, the view was ho-hum (2nd photo). But just look at how a little wallpaper changed the room! There is color and life, a little beach flavor, and a lot of happy cheerful feeling when you walk into this room. Pretty much everything else in the entire house is white (walls, floors, appliances, furniture), so this dash of color is very welcome.

The walls in this room were <em>very</em> crooked and bowed, and I had to pull some tricks out of my hat to keep the pattern looking matched and straight, and to prevent wrinkles in the paper.  And some additional tricks were needed to minimize and obscure the mismatch in the final corner.   No photos, sorry, but it came out great.

The interior designer for this job is Sally Farley – e-mail me if you would like her contact info. The wallpaper is a British pulp paper by Osborn & Little, called “Coralie.”

Almost Like Aesop’s Fables

June 25, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

This cute bunny rabbit pattern looks like something out of a fairy tale! It went in the bathroom of a 15-month old girl. It’s suited to her age, but it will still be appropriate as she grows. It’s neutral color keeps it from being too “girly,” which is good, as this bathroom is also used by two boys, as well as guests to the home.

This wallpaper is by the British company Peony & Sage. It is printed on the newish non-woven substrate and is a paste-the-wall product, also a newish concept. The interior designer on this job is Elizabeth Mann, based in Houston. If you’ve got young kids and want a beautiful home that works with a busy family, she’s your gal. Send me a “Comment” and I’ll put you in touch.

My Helper for the Day

June 24, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

Awww – don’t you just want to give her a hug around the neck? When her family left the house to go shopping, this sweet girl felt lost, so she came and curled up on my drop cloths.

She wasn’t much help in putting up paper, but I did enjoy the company.

Silver Cork in a Galleria Area Dining Room w/Smart Solution for Rounded Outer Corner

June 22, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Textured wallpapers are setting the fashion trends these days! Here is a silver with gold cork wallpaper. I have hung it several times, but I think I like this setting the best, because there is plenty of room to stand back and see the full effect, and there is plenty of light to bounce off the metallic paper. In fact, the husband said, “I can’t wait ’til it gets dark,” because he wanted to see how the room looked under different lighting.

With their modern chandelier and the smoked glass topped table, it silver cork wallpaper makes a stunning backdrop.

In the room-set photo, you can see the paneling / shading effect, which means a difference in color between one strip and the next, or even within a strip. This is a typical and expected look, when using natural materials like cork.

The last photo shows a decorative corner molding the homeowner found at Home Depot, which he used to finish off the rounded edges of the walls in this room of the house. Please see previous post.

This wallpaper pattern is by Thibaut Designs, #T-839-7047, and was bought at a discounted price from Dorota Hartwig at Southwestern Paint on Bissonnet near Kirby. (713) 520-6262 or dorotasouthwestern@hotmail.com. Discuss your project and make an appointment before heading over to see her.

Another New Toy – A Laser Level

June 21, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

This little gizmo, a laser level by Skil (third photo), shoots a perfectly vertical red line onto the wall. This helps so much to keep wallpaper patterns level and true-to-plumb, and is easier and more accurate than using a plumb line or a standard level.

In the top photo, you see the vertical line, and in the second picture, you see both vertical and horizontal lines.

What’s extra nice about this particular model is that it will work in small rooms, like powder rooms (I had it sitting on the top of the toilet tank today), and that it is self-leveling, meaning that it will automatically adjust itself to be accurately level and / or plumb.

A Pretty Paper for a Dining Room

June 20, 2015
Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

Digital Image

The young couple who own this meticulously-renovated bungalow in the Montrose neighborhood of Houston lived for a while in England. They developed a taste for Things British, including wallpaper. This is the second room I’ve done for them, both using traditional patterns made by British manufacturers.

This one is by Nina Campbell, for Osborn & Little. It is a “pulp paper,” a more traditional substrate, as opposed to the “non-woven” materials the company (and many others) is moving toward. I love the pulp papers.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 27 other followers