Posts Tagged ‘townhouse’

Who Thought A Black Bathroom Was A Good Idea? Here’s Better …

August 27, 2017

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This large powder room in a brand new townhome in between Montrose and the Heights (Houst0n) was originally painted black.  It was just too intense.  The interior designer knew that, while still keeping the dark color scheme the homeowners wanted, a little pattern would make the room less foreboding and more inviting.

I skim-floated the walls to smooth them (2nd photo), primed, then hung the paper.  OK, the 3rd photo is dark (not much light in the room + crummy camera), but if you look closely, you can see the pattern.  The other photos show the design nicely.  It’s large in scale, and that’s good, because the walls are nearly 10′ high, so the pattern fills the space nicely.

The interior designer for the job is Pamela O’Brien assisted by Danna Smith, of Pamela Hope Designs.  Their interiors are lovely, clean-lined, yet still warm and liveable.  The wallpaper is by Designer Wallpapers, and was a delight to work with.

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Mirror “Tar” Will Bleed Through Wallpaper – Prevention

May 17, 2017

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Originally, this powder room in a newish townhome in the Rice Military neighborhood of Houston had a mirror that was glued to the wall. Removing it left globs of mastic (tar-like adhesive) stuck to the wall. See Photo 1.

Mastic is petroleum-based, and it, like other similar substances such as grease, oil, and crayon, as well as other compounds like blood, rust, water, tobacco tar, and others, will work their way from behind the wallpaper up through it and then onto the surface, causing an unsightly stain.

KILZ Original oil-based primer and stain blocker is a superb product for sealing these substances. However, I feel more confident if the suspect material is removed entirely.

The best way to do this is to take a Stanley knife (utility knife / box cutter) and cut around the stain and into the wall. Then you can use a stiff 3″ putty knife to peel up the top layer of drywall, taking the staining material with it.

This leaves a patch of Sheetrock without its protective top layer. See Photo 3. These layers of torn Sheetrock will absorb moisture from anything you put on top (paint, primer, joint compound, etc.), and will swell, creating ugly bubbles that will mar the finished job.

So I brushed on Gardz, a penetrating sealer / primer by Zinsser. This is cool stuff, because it soaks into the surface and then dries hard, binding everything together.

In Photo 4, I have skim-floated over the areas where I have cut out the mastic. To skim-float, I trowel on a smoothing material called joint compound. Once that is dry, I will go back and sand it smooth, creating a perfectly smooth surface ready to accept the new wallpaper.

Wallpaper for a Guy – and for a Skyline

May 27, 2016
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The homeowner bought this townhouse just east of downtown because of the incredible view of the Houston skyline. He especially likes the way the buildings sparkle at night.

He chose this dark brown grasscloth with lots of glitter because it accentuates the view out his bedroom window.

The grasscloth is by Phillip Jeffries, and has a masculine, tailored look. I hung it on one accent wall – the wall behind the headboard. It was nice to work with, and will hold up nicely in this bedroom. (Grasscloth is not a good choice in rooms that have water or see a lot of traffic.)

Stripping Off What I Hung Not Long Ago

May 25, 2016
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About four years ago, I hung wallpaper for a young couple in a home they were renting in Montrose (Houston). Now they have bought their own home, and they have to leave the townhouse in the condition it was when they first moved in – so the wallpaper has to come off. 😦

The geometric at the top was an accent wall in a home office, the soft trellis was in their dining room (the dark spot is where I have wet it to start softening the paste as part of the removal process), and the large motif was an accent wall behind their bed in the master bedroom.

All the papers are coming off fairly easily, with minimal damage to the walls. That is thanks to the good primer I put on the walls before installing the paper. 🙂

14′ High Walls, Vaulted Ceiling, 3 Dormer Windows

September 11, 2014

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Digital ImageThis job, in the 3rd floor attic bedroom of a townhouse in the Montrose neighborhood of Houston, is definitely tricky, tedious, and bordering on dangerous – but I’m getting ‘er done! Photo #2 shows my View From Above. 🙂

Yesterday I papered the tallest walls, and today I tackled the vaulted ceiling (photo #1). This is a paste-the-wall product (instead of pasting the back of the wallpaper), and it means a lot of climbing up and down the ladder, but this process is a bit faster and has other advantages with this particular paper and room.

Because the ladder gets in the way, I can only work on an 18″ length of paper at a time. Then I have to climb down, readjust the ladder, climb back up and paste the next section of wall, and then smooth the next 18″ of paper against the wall. Repeat. Many times.

The paper is rolled backwards, to prevent the printed face from bopping against the pasted wall. I am using push pins to hold the strip in place, so it won’t peel away from the wall when I climb down to move the ladder. To keep it from unrolling, I used an alligator clip. He’s happy to help! 🙂

8′ Ladder, 14′ Ceilings, 5 Boxes of Mud, and 50 Rolls of Paper

July 17, 2014

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Digital ImageIt will take 50 single rolls of paper to cover the walls in this huge 3rd floor attic bedroom in a townhouse in Montrose. My first step is to smooth the heavish texture on the walls.

The contractor is graciously letting me use his 8′ ladder, and I can just barely reach the top of the 14′ high walls, one of which is sloped. (Don’t tell OSHA, but I had to stand on the very top of the ladder a few times!) This saved me from hauling in my 16′ extension ladder, which would be cumbersome to bring up the 51 narrow, switch-backing stairs to get to this room, plus the extension ladder is awkward with wallpaper because it leans against the wall you are trying to cover with wallpaper.

First step in getting the walls smooth – Today I spent 12 hours troweling on mud (joint compound). I went through FIVE boxes of the stuff. Each box weighs more than 50 pounds. And I lugged four of them up the 51 steps from the driveway up to the attic room. (A nice painter carried the fifth one for me 🙂 )

The blotchiness you see is the mud drying. Once it is dry, it will all be white. It will take more than a day to dry, so I will go back later in the week to sand the walls smooth, wipe off dust with a damp sponge, and prime. Then, once the painters and other workers are finished, I’ll hang the wallpaper, a pretty toile pattern.

A Little Jungle in the City

May 23, 2014

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Digital ImageCity living has lots of benefits, but not always a lot of green space. So why not bring the outdoors in, and add a little green leafy vegetation to your home?

This wallpaper is by Designer Wallpapers, and was hung in a downstairs bathroom in a townhouse in Montrose.